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Early reflections are mostly due to a single bounce off of a boundary; late reflections are due to multiple bounces. They’ve traveled a longer distance to get back to you, hence the later time and lower amplitude. Why are there more of them? Because there are a lot more opportunities for a sound to bounce twice than once, and even more opportunities for ...


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If it helps, there are a couple of tools you can use to measure room acoustics. REW https://www.roomeqwizard.com/ and Sonarworks reference https://www.sonarworks.com/reference. It's been quite a while since I used either of these tools however I do remember sonarworks' calibration test being the most thorough. The wizard makes things very simple also. It ...


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Reflections are just reflections. The early ones arrive before the later ones simply because they generally have less reflective distance to travel. Additionally, the term 'early' generally refers to reflections before an arbitrary order and 'late' reflections refer to everything else (up to the end of time) - an order being defined by the number of surfaces ...


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You need a gated pulse so microphone records only the reflection. A single pulse can provide a frequency response curve with the proper software


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Well, the problem you are trying to tackle is not one that has a clear solution. There are various research groups as well as companies' R&D departments that are trying to provide their solutions to your problem. The issue here is the "multidimensionality" of the problem at hand. You have time (one dimension), frequency (second dimension, ...


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