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I went through a phase of designing generative music systems in Max a few years ago. It was a fun experiment that produced some interesting results, a few of them linger on my Soundcloud. I'm still quite interested in the concepts but spend more of my time working on signal processing stuff in Max rather than generating music (ie generating note data). ...


3

Although it is a drone or single harmony, the timbre here is rich, and the depth comes from the range of harmonics. Further depth here seems to come from the tones of D5 chord (D + A). Drones like this are not often a single note, but quite an array of harmonics - which lends itself to the experimentation of blending fundamentally different notes for a rich ...


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I think you need to look into the basics of audio synthesis a little bit more before trying this. Any instrument except a pure sine oscillator will not produce a pure sine wave. Instead it will produce a unique wave that will look sort of like a sine wave, but with constantly varying amplitude and pitch. This is what creates the "tone" of an instrument and ...


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At around 4:31 here Leon Dewan gets whats sounds to me like droning string sounds with (what he describes as) a wave-folding synthesis approach. I haven't been able to test it, but, based on his verbal description, he is chaining three steps of: 1) Starting with a signal (the initial source is a pure sine wave) 2) asymmetrically clipping it, reflecting the ...


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In many cases OSC is used to encapsulate MIDI messages into UDP packets so they can be sent over a network (sometimes to multiple destinations). However, the OSC protocol allows many more types of data to be transmitted. For example, you can send 32 bit numbers (float or integer) compared to 8 bit integers in MIDI, and symbolic messages, too.


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I just found a labyrinth of generative material that may lead to some new discoveries for you. And btw I am interested in this subject too, which is how I found this post and this link you might enjoy... http://www.essl.at/works.html#web And THIS is REALLY Cool!! This is what I am aiming to achieve through my studies http://gizmodo.com/5919520/listen-to-...


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you might want to consider investigating the tag 'randomF'.


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From the answers in the mailing list, it seems that using a [t b f] object is how this is handled. When more than one input is involved, each input needs its own [t b f]object:


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Combination? It's nothing more than a pulse-wave, if anything plain through a high-pass filter. From the thin characteristics and fluxing pitch/overtones (which is NOT a good thing in a pitch-pipe) I guess this comes from an old, yet pretty cheap and not yet warmed up analogue synth. And with basic fades in the beginning and end, though the change in ...


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Most people can't actually hear a pure 16.35Hz signal it is quite literally sub-sonic, also the lowest note on a piano is A0 at 27.50Hz which as a pure sine wave is also likely to be inaudible. What most people are hearing are the series of harmonics that occur when the string is struck. So if you combine sine waves of 27.5, 55.0, 82.5, 110.0, 137.5, and ...


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Yes, as Tetsujin states - our perception is different at different frequencies and different volumes. The Fletcher Munson curve is one equal loudness contour. Implementing a crudely drawn version of the curve should help, and as you have a single frequency you can easily scan over the curve using a lookup table or similar to adjust volume (not sure what the ...


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The human ear isn't 'flat' - it struggles at low frequencies, peaks around 4 - 6kHz & fades away somewhere above that, depending on age or prior exposure to loud noise... That's before you take into account your amp, speakers & room resonances. There are several methods of compensating, all of which are far beyond my mathematical skills, but google ...


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I created a Max/msp patch and app that uses convolution reverb to generate drones of this sort: https://soundcloud.com/mark-durham/resonate-drone-selection Some seem quite similar to the sound you're aiming for perhaps? You can read more and download it here: http://sounddesignwithmax.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/creative-convolution-part-1-resonate.html ...


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I don't have time to look at your patch now, but would strongly think your cross-talk problem is related to the lack of $0s in the abstraction. $0s aren't really variables in the same way as $1, $2, etc. which can be assigned numbers by the user. Instead, they represent unique ID numbers that are automatically assigned to an abstraction - and, critically, ...


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