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6

I absolutely love psychoacoustics, it is the very reason I fell in love with sound to begin with, but frankly this is a very very hard question to answer. Psychoacoustics are rarely something really tangible like a sound or a certain technique. There are some cases where you can seriously point a finger at it, like the deep sine-wave in Irrèversible, the ...


6

Whatever is less distracting. If the picture clearly shows the helicopter coming from the right, but I pan it to the left because of the reflections, the listeners are going to think it's really odd and will definitely pull them out of the film. In that scenario, I would pan it in relation to where the chopper is. If you can't see the chopper, I would ...


4

What you are asking is impossible to determine from a spectrogram. Spectrograms indicate frequencies present, not the quality of the audio. There may be loss of fine detail in one that would barely show up on a spectrogram at all or there could be noise and artifacts introduced that would make the spectrogram look more full. Spectrograms do not ...


4

You mean to tell me that you think it's not possible to localize a saxophone or a trumpet? How about a flute? 700Hz is right around F5 on the musical scale; near the upper registers of the former two, and right in the middle of the latter. There is far more that goes into acoustic localization than merely wavelength. One of the biggest factors is timing, ...


4

+1 to @Christian's answer. Just to build on it, it is important to remember that there are two areas of 'psycho-acoustics' in this context; things that will consciously affect the audience, and those effects which subconsciously effect the audience. Using 'conscious' affects on an audience is all to do with sound-association, where certain sounds draw ...


3

this is quite informative: http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/may00/articles/mp3.htm The gist is: as long as any signal can be represented as the sum of sine waves (Fourier's work), and as long as you can deconstruct any signal back to sine waves (FFT, DCT math), then you can use a different way of encoding just the data that's required to reconstruct an ...


3

Random data is hard to compress because it is random, data with a pattern is easy to store. Audio data itself appears fairly random at first, but in actuality there is a pattern to it. Additionally, when you allow certain details to be altered in ways that are not that noticeable to listeners, you can make it fit a pattern that is far easier/smaller to ...


2

You can really look at it in different ways. One is as Paul and Chris have highlighted. It can be used commercially for marketing and business purposes, but I have a feeling you're looking at it differently? I studied Sound Art and my dissertation was about how sound and noise has dictated the way we live in our world. An example... Thames Barrier park in ...


2

As it happens I do nearly all of the composition/sound design for Julian Treasure's The Sound Agency, happy to answer any questions you might have. We've created soundscapes for banks, hotels, shops and even a small town. A lot of what I've done with Julian is designing ambient music for a specific space and we often install the speaker systems as well. Is ...


2

Maybe here.... http://www.juliantreasure.com/Julian_Treasure/Home.html


2

Do you mean that your ears direct you to the wrong location in real life? That happens all the time because of obstruction and reflections. The better person to ask is the person directing the film. What's trying to be conveyed in the scene? Sound does not have to conform to real-life in all settings. The important thing is how it helps focus the viewer ...


2

In a standard film scenario I think I would fall on the side of the cinematic approach, where panning corresponds to the direction of the helicopter as opposed to what would happen in reality. I guess it's a similar argument to the way distant explosions/lightning strikes are traditionally treated in films; you hear them as the event is seen rather than ...


2

I agree with Fred here. I think cinema sound has a set of conventions which don't necessarily reflect reality. When you break those conventions for no other reason than to reflect reality, it tends to stick out as a "mistake" to an average viewer. Film is a collaborative medium though, so a realistic sound treatment can work very well if it's supported by ...


2

Hey Jeremy, You might want to check out this post about sound illusions. http://listverse.com/2008/02/29/top-10-incredible-sound-illusions/ I'm not sure how you would implement any of these in a theatrical setting, but they might give you some inspiration. Also following on from Mark's post, I read somewhere that the resonant frequency of the eyeball ...


2

Suppose you want to save the following sequence of numbers: 0123456789 0123456789 You can store those numbers individually, which would be equivalent to how uncompressed .wav or .bmp works. But, if you agree on certain rules and define those in a certain format (like mp3), you can also save these numbers without explicitly writing down the value of each ...


2

This is simply the way that the brain processes sound information. It's exactly the same as listening to a violin in a dry anechoic environment and then listening to the violin in a concert hall. You still know it's a violin because the brain is able to separate the fundamental sound from the additional reflections in the room. It's the same with distortion ...


2

Do you let it play note on repeat when designing sound? I push the keyboard myself and I found that much better than let it loop the note and sculpting your sound. I often can't resist to go wild with the keyboard too, which is fun and often rewards me with desirable sound.


2

I'm not an expert in psychoacoustics, but in trying out examples such as an 800Hz tone and another (which I varied from 802Hz to 1khz) they were all distinguishable instantly, with no effort. At very close frequencies (ie 0 to about 2 Hz difference) beats were the major audible component, but above that, two pure tones are heard. The only combinations which ...


1

His wording is confusing, but he does mean that the two channels, the original and the duplicate, should be panned hard left and right. The whole point of using the Haas effect is to maintain the even levels of a mono signal, but fooling the brain into locating it either left or right. I’m not sure if you understand how the Haas effect works or not. I’ll ...


1

Best audio quality is difficult to assess objectively. What you can say from the given audiograms is (as you mentioned) that N° 3 includes more high frequencies, which is usually considered better. About the N° 2 audiogram : there's usually no benefit in transcoding a lossy file into another lossy file codec because whatever information has been lost in ...


1

not directly related to comfort levels, but you can also play with absence of sound. for example- if you play a recording of air conditioning, or similar at a low level for most of the show to establish the noise floor, and suddenly cut it out at some point then the new much quieter noise floor becomes more intense.


1

Psychoacoustic compression (mp3 for example) works by removing the parts that you don't hear. That means if there is a loud signal you won't hear a quiet signal that is shortly after. For that time you do not need to save information. Same thing frequency based. If you have a very loud frequency, then you won't hear a quiet frequency nearby. So you have ...


1

I'm not sure if this is technically psychoacoustics as it's more about how the body reacts to sound physiologically than our perception of sound. But as we are physical beings, we also resonate when subjected to sound waves of the right frequencies. Much of it is subsonic - below the frequency of human hearing. Head: about 25hz Eyeball: ...


1

I often fall back on the question, "Does the object (not the sound, the cinematic element) in question sit in the foreground, midground or background of the scene?" Is it shooting at me (foreground), does it represent some amount of danger (midground), is it ambient in nature (background)? Does this change during the course of the scene? etc. On a side ...


1

Perhaps you guys should brush up your physics (after wiping the egg from your faces and apologising to the OP) and have a look at Lord Rayleigh's papers on sound localisation (over 100 years old and still worth reading.) What with the Nobel Prize and the professorship at Cambridge I think he knew what he was talking about. If you're interested in the ...


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