5

Are you looking at the Sound Devices 722 for a specific reason rather than the Sound Devices 702? You REALLY don't need that kind of storage. An 8GB CF card will last you for at least a day for sure, even several. Plus, do you really want to have all your sounds on a huge drive, ready to get corrupt from running around chasing sounds or stollen from being in ...


4

Also, request access to the wardrobe head of department and art department so the recordist can lay down some rules. This is the same as the DOP saying to wardrobe: No high contrast stripes on actors - this will not work with well with many HD digital cameras. The head of sound department will say things like, no dangling metallic jewellery, no noisy ...


4

The general rule is getting the boom as close as possible to the actors mouths WITHOUT getting the mic in the frame! Can't see many directors having the attitude of "it's ok we'll fix THAT in post". Definitely not an attitude i would think a boom op would have on set, unless he/she wanted a very short career in sound...


3

Who says the mic always has to be on a boom? On medium shots, I've hidden mics in planters, taped them onto the shoulder of actors facing the camera to pick up someone speaking behind them, mounted an MK41 on the front of someone who's back is to the camera to pick up the main character's lines who is speaking to him, hidden them in hats, placed them behind ...


3

The Marantz PMD661 is nice. The preamps are quite good (although not quite as good as the Sound Devices), but for a fraction of the price. XLR and 1/4" headphone output. It may or may not suit your needs. It's hard to tell from the original post.


2

Moving blankets in C stands will certainly help. Also take special note to the corners of the rooms on the ceiling. I used to put a bunch of old towels and sheets in a sack or material bag and gaffa tape or hook them onto the corners - doing that for all corners can make a big difference in dampening reverb (I am assuming that's what you are trying to ...


2

Within the standard limitations of lavs, they're awesome. I was pretty happy with my Countryman B3 lav, but the DPA 4060's never cease to impress. About the only thing sweeter is the Sanken COS-11, which seems to be the lav of choice when inter-cutting with Schoeps mics. But I'm a huge fan of the DPA modular connector system, especially as a sound designer ...


1

What you want is to create an audio file that, when played through a speaker that distorts, somehow compensates for that distortion. That's generally impossible, because the distortion is an unpredictable, chaotic 'signal' that's added to your audio. It depends on the exact volume of the audio, the loudspeaker, other sounds in the room, and (because you're ...


1

The descending texture (one of several layers I hear at 1:00) sounds vaguely like a stutter effect with a decreasing playback rate. The source audio matters a lot when working with stutter effects, and they're typically created by experimenting with an existing corpus of samples. In this case, it sounds like the repeating fragment is a sine oscillator ...


1

Are the leaves causing problems with the dialogue or are you just wondering if you can mix production FX with sound FX? If the production sound is a problem you could attempt using Izotope RX. The Decrackler module may help. If you're just looking to add the sound FX,, I would use them subtly to enhance the production FX. Try and match the timbre of the ...


1

Hey Anton! First of all, I like to hear that you're doing both the editing and production recording. Most of the smaller projects I work on I prefer to be controlling all aspects of the audio. Since you're the man with the mic on set, be sure to roll 30 sec of "room tone" after each set-up. This will be your go-to effect when recreating the scene in your ...


1

If you are the filmmaker, then get a production sound recordist. They would be more than happy to help you without explaining the complex decision chain. Otherwise get the mic as close as possible without it being in the part of the frame you want to use. That means either outside of the frame, or where the picture will be replaced with something else, and ...


1

The only time I have seen it be acceptable to have a boom in the shot is when shooting green screen. Typically your video editing program allows you to create a trash mat that eliminates everything but your main subject. Otherwise, follow the advice previously given and get your boom out of the shot. Have you considered using a lavaliere?


1

If you are miking a properly framed close shot (in on an actor's face), than 6-8 inches is great...with the boom OUT of the frame. If it takes 2 more inches to stay out, give it. The sonic difference between 8 and 10 is going to be negligible. Now, if you are talking about any angles other than those up close, you should ASSUME that you will be ...


1

Unless you are making a mocumentry or it is specifically requests in say a scene with a news reporter NEVER NEVER NEVER let your mic show in frame, as a boom op your job is to check the frame first and check with cameraman to make sure this does not happen. As mentioned above it is a complete waste of time fixing something in post when there is no need. All ...


1

Yes I, for obvious reasons, completely agree with Andy. I've never ever heard of anyone saying they'll take the boom out in post, wasteful use of time and unnecessary. Get as close as you can, about 6-8 inches is fine. If it's a wide shot, do it MOS and then ask the director if they can do another shot for sound (unless you quality radio mics).


1

I'd choose Nomad if I were you. pros of the Nomad are the number of inputs, very low power consumption, and it's a very bag friendly recorder (if that's important for you). Have only dr-680 experience (a good one nonetheless) but this is a different price bracket. You should compare Tascam with both SD 788T and Nomad, and choose the one that suits your needs ...


1

If you don't need the timecode and are on a budget, why not look at the Fostex FR2LE? judging by this chart, http://www.avisoft.com/recordertests.htm The mic input noise is not far off sound devices and its way cheaper.


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