7

Strictly defined, overtones are frequencies higher than the fundamental in a musical note, while harmonics are frequencies that are mathematical multiples of the fundamental. For example, 400Hz has harmonics at 800, 1.2KHz, 1.6KHz, 2KHz, etc. More colloquially, both "harmonic" and "overtone" are often used interchangeably to refer to frequencies beyond the ...


6

There are a few tricks, besides the EQ roll-offs, that you can use to situate things in an outdoor environment. Reverb plug-ins typically have two main components: early reflections and reverb. Most outdoor locations don't trap in the acoustic waves, so you're going to want to reduce the reverb side of the plug-in significantly (maybe enitrely). Use the ...


6

Unison - Detune Simultaneous voices singing approximately the same pitch, but slightly detuned from one another. Inspired by the sonic artifact produced when a choir sings a note in unison without being in perfect tune with each other, this characteristic can be replicated by duplicating a single audio recording and moving the pitch randomly up and down ...


5

For post-production, I'm not aware of any hardware device that can do what the software equivalent can't, with the exception of noise reduction hardware, such as CEDAR. That, and perhaps 5.1 processors, like the TCE Reverb 4000. But after speaking with Doug Jackson a couple weeks ago about this, he showed that the TCE reverbs on the dub stages he works on ...


5

Not all processors work the same way. Probably the most-imitated one is the Aphex Aural Exciter, which was the original. The quotes below are from http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/1995_articles/feb95/exciters.html The Aphex Aural Exciter (the first one): ...some of the input signal is diverted, via a side-chain and a high-pass filter, into a harmonics-...


4

In general, listen to whether it sounds good or whether it has something that irritates you. Or whether the sound is fitting or whether it's e.g. weak (in the modern days of dynamics squashing that can be a valid notion that you may want to adjust with compression. Just remember what the dialogue is for, i.e. it has to sound humanly like the person who's ...


3

The point of over sampling is not about hearing frequencies above 20k. The point of over sampling is to make it easier for the filters to filter everything out above the nyquist frequency. When you sample at lower sampling rates such as 44.1 or 48 the quality of the filter matters more. So if you record with an amazing ad converter with a really expensive ...


3

If the recordings need EQ, dynamics, and noise reduction, then I apply it. I'm not afraid to process my stuff. I want the sounds in my library mastered and ready to go. Guns are pretty much the only thing I treat differently, based on the way I work with gun sounds, I prefer the source completely raw.


3

You can use an Audio to MIDI plugin to generate notes and some MIDI expressions. You can record this as a MIDI file or route its output within your host audio editor to a synthesizer plugin in it. You can start with checking this Audio-to-MIDI plugins: WIDI Midifier (There are audio examples at the end of the page) Since these are plugins and you need ...


3

To add to James' answer… I would personally never use a delay to fake the number of voices, I would always just keep adding tracks til I had enough. Secondly, I always pan all BVs away from centre [spread from 10% to 100% width], leaving a hole for the lead vox if there is one, or just a space in the centre if there isn't. So long as it's not too big a ...


2

Start with the right style of voice and performance, which are in the ballpark of what you're looking to achieve. Then edit and process it however possible until it sounds like something nice, without destroying it. Vocal processing is tricky and relies largely on the recorded performance/voice, unless ones making sci-fi vocals, which can take lots of ...


2

I mostly agree with Chris Bishop answer. I would like to add that External hardware units are in general great for take-out some CPU demands - especially mentioned TC Reverbs (or TC Electronic System 6000) are great because they have no impact on CPU :) Today is "relatively easy" to model non-linear behavior such as saturation and others. Companies like ...


2

Though I use mainly software plugins it's actually more because my mixes rarely has less than 400 tracks, and even trying to buy well over 400 compressors would seriously kill me. Or my wallet, whichever comes first. All convolution-reverbs are also software, as most I've used about 20 in the same reel (Some otherwise good Altiverb impulses have the annoying ...


2

Chances are more than 75% of the result is the actors performance (e.g. them articulating their voice that way the best they can, and/or using ways they can manipulate their voice in real - life like helium, crunching their nose, talking through objects, etc). Check out Antares AVOX Throat (I think that's what it's called?) Even very very CAREFUL uses of ...


2

In short, this is a very hard one to answer because even between all our peers, the answer to this is all broadly subjective (taste and nuance) within a narrowly defined objective (calibration and QC specs). I'd love to elaborate on this a little later, so I will be appending to this, but in a nutshell this is my thought/gut reaction, being a dialogue ...


2

That's an extremely hard question to answer, and would result in an answer thick as the bible. But the quintessence of it all is to keep it even, fluent, and remove everything that isn't needed for the scene or feeling, and replace sounds that sound bad or just wrong. Also to never ever use more processing than you actually need. The dialogue editing is more ...


2

Although many good answers have been given already, I would like to point you in the direction of this book. It's not exactly written to teach 'what a voice' should sound like, but goes in depth to teach about dialogue editing and workflow. Furthermore: Directing, recording and editing a voice is an art and I think one should have an obvious talent for it. ...


2

For pitch shifting down you need more than a 0 - ∼22.05kHz bandlimited signal to try to maintain some highs in the downpitched version. For digital recording you need more than 44.1kHz total sampling rate for 1. Making all gear-related conversion and input/output stage signal processing so that audible problems aren't induced to the audible range or the ...


2

Antares Kantos did this. However, it was released around 2002, and appears to be no longer available from Antares, so I'm not sure it is possible to obtain a legitimate copy these days. A brief search suggests that there are sites which claim that it is freeware now, and possibly offer it for download, but I cannot vouch for those sites. The general, brief ...


2

Yes, audio software, be it a DAW or a live mixing console, do use multithreading and multicore functionality. Example 1 : Pyramix MassCore technology “hides” one or more cores in a multiple CPU computer and then creates a “pipe” directly between the software and those hidden cores to essentially create an Intel-powered DSP based system. Example 2 :...


1

Magic sounds is always that we can't hear in real life. For your event try to mix this sounds: 1) Good warm and bright chimes. Try to find them in some orchestral vst instruments. Render a few variations, take 2 of them and pan hard left and right (left -100% right - 100%). 2) Sizzle of fire torch (\Boom Libraries\Cinematic Trailers - Construction Kit\...


1

Hey there. The goal should be to analyze what you hear and determine if it sounds natural. What does that mean? Well, if you hear hi freq or low freq that generally are not there in real life, that is because the mic or actor have those freqs in recording and you need to adjust it to balance it back to the real world as much as you can. Usually involes eqing ...


1

There's a balance between proper editing of the dialog tracks and proper use of the processing that Jay mentioned, but also the effects of masking when you introduce atmospheres, walla, foley, roomtones, and reverb/early reflections. For instance, even without EQ or compression, the acoustical variations, small amounts of background noise, level differences, ...


1

Sounds something that I personally would not even try. For some reason there sometimes seems to be a tendency to think that everything can and should be attempted to be done with post-processing instead of getting to the source. I guess Avox Throat (although I have no personal experience with it) or certainly something that does partial and noise based ...


1

everything I record goes into Izotope RX2 for inspection. weird bumps, hits, birds etc are all removed with spectral repair. sometimes I'll do some subtractive eq, sometimes I'll do so pretty radically (ex, if I caught a door chime or whatever that has no tones under 400hz, I'll just chop everything off underneath that. sometimes I'll use the RX denoise ...


1

I cut and clean, for an immediate usable sound. Meaning de-noise, eq, sometimes light compression. If the sound requires more aggressive eq to smooth out freqs or noise, I don't hesitate. Whatever captures the essence of the sound. When time permits and a sound inspires, I'll tweak / processe it and create a new version(s) that will also be added in a ...


1

I ALWAYS keep an original in it's original state. Out of caution or principal? Probably both. More often than not, it's just a straight 'top and tail'. EQ if absolutely necessary and, even then, I'll save that as a copy. This works for me as it suits the way I like to use my recordings.


1

I usually apply minimal processing (fade in, fade out and perhaps a little gain adjustment) but no EQ processing, as I like to keep the recording as close to the original as possible. However, if there is an obvious edit needed (eg. removing a short unwanted noise in an ambiance recording) I'll do it to this version. I'll store this file in my library, then ...


1

Another thing to keep in mind when it comes to post audio, especially on the mix stage, is I need everything automated. I usually don't do a record pass to my stems until after we have completed the reel and not all hardware gear is easy to automate. I use pretty much all software for mixing and that keeps my automation contained and also easy to recall. ...


1

I personally love some of the sounds of the Waves modeled plug-ins, such as the API 2500 compressor. There are hundreds of plug-ins out there that model the analog sound, and do it amazingly as Tomas said above. Look at Reason 6.5's mixer, its modeled after an SSL board. However, one thing I really do enjoy is having the physical feeling of knobs and sliders....


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