5

The suspect area is the ¼" jack & ¼" - ⅛" adaptor. It needs to be correctly wired as a mic input to that specific jack socket, which on a Mac is a 4-pole connector, TRRS, for headset/mic combos. I can't see the whole TR[R]S to be able to guess, but even if it is correct, the mono Shure TS jack is going to be shorting the connections inside the ⅛" ...


5

"Power" isn't really the issue. Certainly, most interfaces can offer enough wattage to cause ear damage, theoretically. However, the actual power is not determined by the HP-output alone, but by the headphones' own impedance as well: if it's substantially larger than the output impedance, then P = U2 / Z where U is the (RMS) output voltage of the ...


1

It depends on the power expectations and circuit design of the microphone. Some phone lavalier mics use a LR44 battery. Maybe yours does, too. The LR44 battery, for example, has a nominal voltage of 1.5V and 105 mAh. USB has 5V and 3A (USB-C). That's a lot more power than a device using a LR44 battery would expect. If you wired it up directly, you'd probably ...


1

Important Caveat - never worked with modular before, but... Specs in the manual require +/- 12v only. No +5v requirement. Current requirements are +12v 150mA and -12v 45mA. This is well within the specs (300mA) of the power supply you are proposing to purchase.


1

your amplifier is capable of delivering 240 Watts of energy. Power (Watts) = Voltage (volts) x Current (amps) Therefore the current range is: Power/Voltage = Current 240 W / 12 V = 20 A 240 W / 26 V = 9 A So when powering the amplifier from a higher voltage, you are likely to require less overall current. Maximum current drain at maximum power is 20A ...


1

In almost any professional setup beyond very small setups, the speakers are passive. An amplifier (power amp) powers the signal and sends the signal down the line that drives the speakers. Multiple speakers can be driven from a single amp, but the power is divided between the speakers and they all play the same thing (since they are being driven from the ...


1

70-volt floating line [also known as Constant Voltage systems] The idea behind 70 Volt and perhaps more common in the UK, 100 Volt line systems is that you have an amplifier that puts out 70 Volts at maximum output which for argument's sake is say 120 Watts RMS. You can now attach speakers via individual transformers which will take some power from this ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible