4

MDF has very good acoustic properties at a low price. But it is heavy and does not hold up well to being bumped around. Also doesn't do well in moist environments. It is not used for pro portable speakers for those reasons. It's a good choice for speakers that won't be moved very much. Almost all professional speakers use void free Baltic Birch plywood. ...


3

Hi Aural Chef, I too was looking at the H4n (among other things) but ended up getting the H2n. I have to say that IMO the H2n is the handier of the two for field recording with the potential for surround recording (which for me is sometimes useful) or the MS, which can be recorded in Raw Mode for later decoding, which again for me is also useful. While ...


3

While the Zoom recorders and all those of the same echelon are mot the same as a Sound Devices or FR2, I strongly believe somethig which either Jay or Tim mentioned, which is that the best recorder is the one you have on you (in the same vain that the best mic for the job is the one in your hand). I started out using an H4n and rven though I've since ...


2

If your budget can stretch to a bit over $200 and are certain you don't need external mics then the Sony M10 should do the job. If you need external mics and can tolerate the high self-noise when using the built-in mics, then the Zoom H4n. There are a lot of excellent recorders in the $200 - $500 range. Which one works best for you probably depends more on ...


2

The microphone signal level will typically not be strong enough to produce acceptable quality at the AUX (line level) input. You need a pre-amplifier to convert the signal from one to the other. Most mixers have one or more; you can also use a standalone pre-amp, and some of them can run on batteries. There are also microphones with built-in pre-amps, but ...


1

This is a very difficult question to answer. It comes down to "how loud is loud enough" which is the same is "how long is a piece of string" So let me try answer in a generic way. Sound Pressure Level Often people mix terms like "power or watts" with "loudness" of a system. And generally speaking a system with more "watts" would be louder than a system ...


1

My low cost solution was to buy a Sound Devices MixPre-D to use with my iPad3: http://sonicskepsi.wordpress.com/2012/08/31/ipad3-♥-mixpre-d-♥-auria/ Hope this helps!


1

How about the Tascam DR-70D? Around $300 not as small but still easily backpack able. Noise floor specs seem respectable and less than h6 and h6 perhaps even the tascam 100mkII Any opinions anyone?


1

The Olympus LS-10 has really good built in mics (for the price anyway) and can be found refurbished for about $130. You are going to have a really hard time finding anything particularly solid under the $100 mark though. It's hard to get a good mic for under $100 let alone an entire recorder. The quality you get starts going up a lot very rapidly as you ...


1

For that price range you may need to consider buying used. Recorders like the Zoom H2 are nearly indestructible, record in stereo (24/96) or quad (24/48) and sound remarkably good. I use mine all the time; it's been through the wringer, dropped and dinged, broken parts and corroded mic grilles, but still going strong. (Just used it last weekend to record for ...


1

stretch to the cost of a Sony PCM-M10. you will never, ever, regret it.


1

There is the Zoom H1, which is around $100 and ticks most of the boxes you mention. However, I'm not sure it will produce good enough recordings of the wildlife you mention. You get what you pay for, $100 is really not sufficient to get high quality components. Add to that the narrow stereo image of the H1 (because of the xy mic setup), which makes the ...


1

I still don't have 50 experience to comment on an above post, but I'll second the Mix-pre. I'd buy used for around $600 or so and spend the rest on whatever new recorder you find to your liking. You're going to get good, quiet preamps, and low noise phantom power, along with several other features. You're going to want low noise equipment when recording ...


1

Fostex FR2-LE or Tascam DR-680 End of thread.


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The options are quite wide as there's not only the XLR outputs, but also the tape out which is 3,5mm. If you want to use XLR, then the tascam DR-40 or DR-100mkII are the most common choices. For the tape out, I would recommend the Sony M10, Roland R-05, or any of the Olympus LS-series. If you want something with decent internal mics, then the Sony D50 is ...


1

I always think Michael Raphael's blog about his location recorder trajectory is a useful read when thinking about what recorder you want to buy. I'm not suggesting you copy him exactly, but his notes on why the Fostex wasn't necessarily the best for him are interesting. http://www.noisejockey.net/blog/2009/07/05/the-gateway-drug-samson-zoom-h2/


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