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8

You need a pop filter if the mic is in a direct line in front of your mouth - whether you buy one, or stretch a piece of material over a frame in front, put a sock over it, whatever. You don't need one if the mic is off to one side, so you can never breathe or 'pop' directly into it. This would require lifting the high frequencies to compensate; so would ...


5

It's worth noting that many mics actually have a pop filter built-in, in particular live vocal mics such as the SM58. Such filters generally don't work as good as a proper external lollipop-screen, meaning they take away more treble. (The main difference is, foam absorbs more sound than light fabric.) But for speech, this isn't actually such a big deal: most ...


3

They're not strictly necessary, but they're certainly preferable. But that doesn't mean you need to buy an actual pop filter! You can easily slip a sock or a cotton shirt over your mic and it'll have close-ish to the same effect.


2

The pop shield (the circle one) is for regular speech recordings. It blocks out the 'P' and 'B' sounds that could possibly create a 'pop' in the recording and make it sound low quality. The windshield (the one that slips over the mic) is just a windshield. It doesn't protect against pops or 'P' and 'B' sounds. Basically use the circle one. And point the ...


2

Pop filters are necessary for anything voice related. It helps with sounds such as 'P' and 'B'; This is called plosives. Plosives is extra air going onto the microphone causeing a very annoying heavy breath/bass sound. If you care about audio quality and you want to be great at what you do, get a pop filter. You will not be disappointed.


1

Clipping and discontinuities can be detected by using the Izotope RX De-clicker and selecting "output clicks only". The resulting timeline will indicate where in the original material the discontinuities are. Not all of them will be full-on faults in the recording, you will have to use your ears to determine which of the candidate artifacts are actually real ...


1

It has a standard Euro thread, so it will go on any mic stand. One of the best pop shields is a simple diffuser you can make at home. You can buy these ready-made & quite neat-looking, with a proper clip... ...but the principle is the same. Stretch a pair of tights [ladies' hose] over a coat hanger. It can be as rough as you like... or as neat... ...


1

May be because of the notes, you might hear it's wobble. But actually it's more like gliding sub-bass. You can start with "3x Osc" default sound. 1 - To get a gliding sound, you need to turn on the "mono" function which is in the fourth tabs of 3x Osc. 2 - As it's a sub-bass, you have to draw the note in a very low octave. May be around C3 or C2....


1

The pop filter should, by design, offer you some protection from plosives. Since the mic is on a tripod you do not need to worry so much about protecting the mic with the foam windshield, unless there is a fan or breeze in the room. That is typically what the windshield is for. The H4n built-in mics are 2 stereo cardioids that are in an XY position, which ...


1

Waves has a plugin called W43 and a preset called "Wind" I usually drop the low slider down until the plosives are under control.


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