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7

Deep and resonant with less sharpness sounds like you want to put the mic underneath the piano pointing up at the sound board. You'll probably want to move it around down there and experiment with how it sounds in different places pointed towards different parts of the sound board. I'd start off pointed toward the bridge in the middle of the board, ...


5

Actually you can do soundproofing without damaging the house. Using acoustic panels (expensive but provides the best result) works, however some well placed blankets using string and 3M adhesive hooks in a carpeted room can vastly change the sound of the recording because of reduced reverberation. Picking a recording time that has the least amount of noise ...


5

First, the D-20 isn't a piano. It is a synthesizer, which is a type of instrument that allows you to create a wide variety of sounds. The good news is that the D-20 was intended for creating realistic instrument sounds rather than just sci-fi bleeps and bloops. The bad news is that by 2013 standards, the D-20 is going to sound a lot less realistic than ...


3

Many of them - amongst the simplest & possibly cheapest would be EasyKeys by Toontrack - [No affiliation, just the one I use for quick sketches & often it stays at the final mix] They make 'grand' & 'upright' versions, amongst others - I haven't got the entire range but they tend to be pretty good; great for sketching, as they're lightweight. ...


2

I think this might help https://archive.org/details/SynthesizedPianoNotes You can search in archive.org for more


2

I don't think you can substitute a piano with our current technology. The main problem I see is that even with a fully weighted electronic keyboard the player would not have the same physical feedback, only part of it, and that would influence his playing to a great extent. For instance, the thump of the key reaching the keybed is not only sound but a very ...


2

The Izotope RX denoiser would probably be what you would want to use. I don't think you want to remove the room noise entirely but just reduce it so that it still sounds natural and you still hear the "air".


2

The guys at Ableton went for simplicity. This being said, it turned out to be a sane decision. If you read through the manual, you'll realize Ableton's piano roll supports step input, "draw" input, regular input, quick note velocity editing, transposing, doubling/halving note duration, MIDI parameter envelope editing (graph-style and grid/draw style), and ...


2

First – obviously, sound starts at the instruments. Rich, classical sound pretty much requires at least a decent baby grand. If you only have an ordinary upright piano, no miking can really get you there. Similarly, the room acoustics have an enourmous influence: any square room has nasty resonances, and even if these are hardly noticeable while you're ...


2

The two options you are suggesting are very different. But there may be a third that you are not thinking of. To understand this, you need to understand that there are three components at play here, but these components may often be combined into a single device. These three components are controller, synthesizer, and monitor. The controller is your ...


2

Garageband supports Audio Units (AU). If the plugin only supports VST format, it won’t appear.


2

Most sound boards use mono channels. You can't feed stereo in to a mono channel. Since it supports TRS balanced audio, one channel is inverted and combined with the other, this results in canceling out all but whatever is different between the left and right channel. XLR won't help because XLR is designed for mono audio and still is going in to a mono ...


2

Steps: Select music Rehearse music Record music. Not unusual to have several takes of each piece. Mix. Cut and glue together best parts of takes. Master. Apply EQ, dynamics. Add metadate. Export in required format. Create visual art. Needs at least an "album front". Preferrably video today. Publish. Equipment: Musician Piano Room Microphones and ...


1

Your question is a bit confusing, but I will answer by showing you an example. Your Instruments: CP300 Piano - Line Outs = 2 x XLR / 2 x 1⁄4 inch(Phone) Jack Silent Violin - Line Out = 1 x mono 1/4 inch TRS(balanced phone) Jack (a guess?) Microphone - Mic Level = 1 x XLR So let's look at a scarlet interface: Scarlett 2i2 (User Guide - 2nd Gen) - (...


1

Firstly, they are very unlikely to be balanced outputs from the keyboard if they are 1/4" mono jacks. I understand when using just the left (mono) output from the piano, it "sums" both the left and right outputs into just one signal, This is correct. Usual behaviour for a keyboard. if I ran 2 cables..one to the left output and one to the right output ...


1

I'm going to cut to the chase and keep this really simple for you. Firstly, you don't really need to worry too much about the overall recorded sound in a practise environment as you should only be concerned with the overall performance and interpretation at this stage. So really we need to discuss the recorded sound either in a recording session situation ...


1

There's a whole lot of misunderstanding going on in your question… … what's going to disappoint you still further is even when you get to the end of this rambling essay, you're still not going to have a definitive answer. That's because you could write entire books on the subject [& people have]. Firstly, though the lowest fundamental on a regular ...


1

Any unbalanced connection in a configuration such as this will unbalance the entire connection. The way to make this work is to connect the elements in the following way: Ground (Piano) ----- [ Ground (XLR) (Pin 1) --- Join to --- Signal- (Pin 3) ] Signal (Piano) ----- [ Signal+ (XLR) (Pin 2) ] If you want to balance the entire connection, you will need a ...


1

I suggest using 2 (condenser) microphones instead of the Shure Beta 91A because there is a lot of sound coming from a lot of different places and placing a single microphone underneath the strings won't capture all of that. Also, with 2 microphones you can pan left/right to make a stereo image (which can be very nice to listen to but probably won't be ...


1

Experiment with ADSR envelope setting. Here are some excerpts from the manual that might help: 36 6.2.14 Velocity Switch Velocity switching is an extremely useful and creative tool for customizing a performance. Using Velocity Switching, it is possible to have either one sound switch to another sound at a set velocity, or even for a second ...


1

If you simply want to record the piano with Audacity, you will need a stereo line input on the computer. You connect the OUTPUT stereo phone jack(⅛ inch I think) from the RP-302 to the line input on the computer using a suitable stereo cable. If your computer doesn't have a line input, you would need to buy an audio interface with the relevant inputs. A ...


1

First of all, we need to get audio running from your digital piano into the computer. This means you need an interface. Here's a link for a very basic one that's also pretty easy on the wallet: http://www.amazon.ca/Ultra-Low-Latency-Interface-Digital-Output/dp/B000KW2YEI I have the same one which I found at a local music store for around $30 CAD. The ...


1

You need a digital sampler. Most DAWs come with their own, dedicated software sampler but a great 3rd-party sampler is CWITEC's TX16Wx sampler since it's modeled after real hardware technology. Also, defined instruments in soundfonts can be configured to span the whole keyboard spectrum so double check and make sure they aren't limited to one key like you ...


1

I'd go with two of the same microphone type (large-diaphragm type), one close to the piano and one further away to capture some ambient sound and reflections in the room. This way you can adjust the level of directness/"wet"-ness afterwards (moreover the ambient source may be a better choice if you afterwards want to apply artificial reverb, should your ...


1

Its probably multiple issues that your dealing with. The gear your using is fairly low-mid end and probably doesn't have the frequency response and tone of more expensive or just better suited mics. It could be that your mic placement could be better as well. If your recording in an untreated or improperly treated room that would be another issue where ...


1

Reading the above, I don't think that your synth, or the interface is the issue. Running a synth directly into an interface normally just gives a pretty boring copy of the original tone. When I'm recording synths, I like to run them through an amp, any amp, and mic the output. Depending on the desired result, running through a small bit of overdrive, ...


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