4

Phase cancellation is a common cause of confusion for many audio professionals, sometimes this is caused by a channel becoming inverted for some reason. Maybe this answer can help you, and other people reading this, to identify, or eliminate this type of phase cancellation as the cause of a problem. I've analysed the audio from the video and have come to a ...


3

Having listened to mentioned in comments - the effect doesn't come in at the 49s mark, it's there right from the start. It is definitely a phase issue - but I'm not sure what's causing it. If you've eliminated the potential physical issues as described by Joel, than what remains is a routing issue. I'm going to take a ...


2

This might be due to a phase problem, With your headphones and speakers the audio source is still really near so you fully enjoy the space emulation without loosing level. When you are far from your speakers a lots of frequencies might be cancelled and impossible for you to hear. The 3rd voice (man) is Ok other voices have a bad phase. Try to switch the ...


1

No there isn't. The phase problem was locked into the file during the mix process.


1

Glad the OP is no longer having the problem, but I am very confident I hear the artifacts of a noise reduction plugin all over this YouTube recording. Coupled with a considerable amount of ambient room noise from the mic not being close enough to the person speaking, NR will cause exactly this kind of result when the settings are too aggressive or drastic. ...


1

FINALLY! I found this in the Audacity docs, and this part of it: Right-click once again over the required input device, click Properties then click the Advanced tab. Set Default Format to mono or stereo to match with the number of "recording channels" in Audacity's Device Toolbar or the Devices tab of Audacity Preferences (Audio I/O tab in legacy Audacity ...


1

Most likely there is a fault with your recording set up or microphone. The 'Mars effect' might actually be caused by a low frequency vibration that is getting into the mic, possibly from the computer or fan somewhere. It may cause some modulation on the signal depending on how loud it is, some structural vibrations from a desk can be quite loud. Try ...


1

If you are able to filter out the vocals, you could invert the phase and that would cancel out the vocals, leaving the rest of the track intact. You can remove the vocal if it is centered in the mix. The problem is that drums and bass tend to be centered as well, especially the kick. Using mid-side processing you could potentially extract the elements you ...


1

What you actually need here isn't a "phase aligner", it is an automixing solution like the Dugan automixer. This is built in to some of the higher-end recorders like the Sound Devices 788T or 688T but is also available as a plugin - I believe that Waves supply a Dugan automixer. An automixer has the ability to automatically manage the gain of a suite of ...


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