We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

13

I agree with @AJ Henderson explanation of "Wall of Sound" concept. I'd like to add one more perspective. Some years ago I've ran into a very interesting way to look at a mix. The concept was about thinking of your audio image as of actual 3D image. Where the space can be defined by following means: Right\left - panning\balance Up\Down - EQ Far\Close - Space ...


12

Distance (Front/Back) can usually be achieved by a high pass/high shelf filter (to simulate the loss of highs as a sound source moves further away in reality), low frequency diffusion, change in volume, increase/decrease in early reflections, increase/decrease in level of the reverb tail. The early reflections and reverb tail are obviously dependent on the ...


9

This is confusing panning with space in the "wall of sound". There are multiple dimensions to sound. At a minimum you have placement in terms of relative "volume." You also have the dimension of frequency from low to high frequencies. You also have left to right placement in a stereo mix and if you are doing surround, you may have additional axis that ...


6

The quickest and easiest way is a little bit of reverb and volume, adding more reverb the farther the subject is away (but not TOO much, unless they're 100 meters away down a brick hallway). After that, subtle use of a low-pass filter or simply rolling the highs off. Finally, a slight doppler effect can work wonders.


5

You can do a basic implementation manually in any daw: Copy the track Pan both tracks left and right respectively and symmetrically The dry channel should be around 18dB louder than the Haas channel Add a time delay of 13ms-~50ms to 'Haas' channel' Be careful how much Haas you use, it affects the tonality of the track when summed to mono. If you have ...


5

The process you're describing is broadly known as mixing, and there are a few basic parts to it: Setting volume levels appropriately using track levels and equalizers Moving the sounds left and right in the stereo field (known as panning) Moving the sounds "forward" and "backward" in the mix, generally done using a reverberation effect Getting a good blend ...


5

With headphones you will get complete separation of left and right channels. You will only hear the left channel in the left ear and the right channel in the right ear, assuming you don't listen at insane volumes or put the headphones on backwards :) With speakers, aside from the reverb and echos in the room mentioned by @Eugene, you will still hear at ...


4

For the most part, with centered mixes, there is very little difference between speakers and headphones other than the impact of the acoustics of the room versus the sterile headphone environment. When you get in to stereo panning, however, an interesting thing happens. In a room, both ears hear sound from both speakers, so a sound coming only from the ...


4

There are spatializer plugins that you can use like Kontakt, Wave Arts, IRCAM tools. These will position the sound in a 3d stereo field.


4

Not practically. In stereo sound, the phantom center is the 'illusion'. Exactly center is whatever is exactly identical between the two channels. One can generalize and say that the width of the image is proportional to how 'different' the two sounds are. But it actually turns out this is a mathematical property of sound. Ignoring that there are a few other ...


3

There are several ways to do this. Simple answer: You can edit each channel separately. When the wave-form is selected, you can hit the up arrow key or down arrow key to change the selection to left only or right only. You can choose to Normalize each channel to 100% or adjust them by ear. Or you can play it totally safe and mix either channel separately ...


3

The uses range from simple separation (one instrument left, another right, vocals and percussion centred) to realistic spatial separation to match the real world environment. Effectiveness is a very subjective point - what I'd suggest is listening to a track by your favourite artist and turning the balance full left and full right to see what is panned ...


2

I've used divergence to good effect on feature documentaries. The narration can be diverged slightly across LCR (30% maybe) to give it a different soundfield to centre channel only dialogue and interviews. It's particularly useful in sports documentarie, where the archive material may have a commentary on it which needs to be heard, but still to feel ...


2

There is Freehaas. I'm not sure how successful it is in implementing the haas effect, buit provides thickness to my mixes when I use it, and it's intuitive and light.


2

Spanner is a new AAX plugin from maggot which does the kind of thing you are asking. www.maagot.co.nz/software/spanner.shtml


2

If all you're doing is changing the output bus to a higher channel count, it should keep the panning information and spread it across the new channel layout appropriately.


2

Well, I don't think that there will be much difference in stereo panning when using headphones rather than speakers since in both cases you have a correct stereo image provided by 2 sources. Of course there will be a difference in what you hear as described by @AJ Henderson but there's nothing you should do differently in sense of mix. However another issue ...


2

I haven't used Adobe Audition before, but I suppose, that you used automation. You should be able to copy automation from one track to another. Second option could be duplicate the track (with automation) and replace audio.


2

I would guess TV shows are often "mastered" either the same way or very similarly for broadcast versus DVD and Blu-Ray since the final output equipment is the same in either case. The release of two episodes of Game of Thrones was specifically described as "remastered" for IMAX, so we can expect the audio portion was mastered differently for delivery to IMAX....


2

This is because one stereo separated super saw (6-9 voices) will have the same phase drift in both the speakers. However, when layering the sound with itself and pan one to the left and one to the right, you get 2x the same sound, but each having a different phasing to them (since the phases have a factor of randomness added to them by your DAW to make them ...


2

This is not a field I work in, though I am a [retired] sound engineer & currently work in the TV/film industry, so it's one where I watch & listen to the results of other people's work a lot, therefore this is going to be 'opinion with a good deal of thought behind it'. Leave it in the centre. Really, unless you are trying to indicate that someone ...


1

One thing you could try: Split the sound you want into 2 layers, Split the EQ into highs frequencies on one layer and low frequencies on another. Next add a chorus to your high frequency layer and play around until you have a chorus styled distorted sound (I usually set the dry/wet between 25% and 50% on the chorus). Another thing you could ...


1

Stereo expander If you put a stereo expander on the master channel, it will affect every channel on your mixer. You will have to add stereo expander like UpStereo to a single channel to expand a single sound. Stereo separation You could also use the stereo separation knob on the mixer (if the mixer has this function). For example: take three same ...


1

It seems the effect you are looking to achieve is either chorus or unison (both basically work the same way though). Another alternative would to simply use a stereo expander, this would be best if the sample/synthesized sound you are using already has unison/chorus applied, or would not sound great with unison or chorus (ex. snare drum). There are plenty of ...


1

If you set up your routing it should be fine. So you're going from your mono (and possibly some stereo) tracks (dia, sfx, bg..) into the appropriate aux (dia aux, sfx aux, bg aux...). When you get to the hd rig you'll add an LCR aux that will be fed from all your stereo auxes to your speaker output.


1

I'd argue there isn't simply because often effects end up impacting the stereo image. There may be relatively common selections for placement, but I don't think they are hard and fast rules and I don't think they always remain static at those settings. In general, there aren't "rules" in art, there are sometimes "guidelines" but even that is loose since ...


1

have you tried searching with google? my 2nd hit on "sox audio panning" http://forum.videohelp.com/threads/348768-sox-audio-mixing-4-channels-down-to-2


1

ProTools does have a built in surround panner, it has for a long time. Have you read the manual at all? It sounds like you already have a bias against ProTools without having actually used it all based on your 2nd question. You just have to have the 5.1 mixer installed and surround panning will work. Did you click on the small fader next to the volume ...


1

Reaper has this as a native (and very usable) effect plugin. It's not one of the plugins they offer as gratis VSTs, but if you're considering to switch the DAW anyway do give Reaper a try, it's great and not quite GPL but about as free as proprietary software can get! As said by ObscureRobot, this kind of effect is really easy to write yourself, I built one ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible