Hot answers tagged

1

Natural waterfalls are exactly as you describe - just band limited noise, but if you were to sound design a waterfall for a soundscape, or to describe a picture, you might consider introducing some of the detail of the action you are witnessing, for instance, bubbling of water across rocks etc. It depends entirely on how close the perspective of the scene ...


1

You could use a Song Meter if you have somewhere safe to mount it: http://www.wildlifeacoustics.com/products/song-meter-sm2-birds Usually used for wildlife recording. I expect it would pick up at that range, but you would not be able to measure loudness levels or anything that detailed.


1

You need to use a fabric which is known as Hogs Hair. This material will absorb the droplets of water as they hit and will disperse them, protecting them mic from both the liquid and also the sound of the liquid. Assuming you are using a Rycote or Rode blimp, you can cover the top of the blip with hogs hair to protect the microphone and blimp. This is a ...


1

Protecting microphones from rain is quite a challenge, and I haven't found the perfect solution either yet: it is not only about protecting the microphone itself from damage, but also getting rid of the sound of the rain drop impacts straight on the mic and its windshield/foam. The best results I have achieved so far when recording rain was by putting the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible