5

In short, no, It's not possible. The distances & times are measure in microns & nanoseconds. Any retro-fit kit would need to be made for each specific headphone model, which is simply not financially viable, even if physically possible.


3

It really depends on the material; are these sounds that you want to remove truly peaking at a lower level than every bit of the speech? How about in loudness or 'energy'? You need to look into the kind of sounds you want to remove and see how they differ from the ones you want to keep. This is key to being able to separate them. Are they of a shorter ...


3

Yes, you will get noise cancellation even if you're not playing music. Don't take my word for it - any search engine should give you hits like this and this. There are some that will cancel noise even if the input plug from the headphones is removed. Keep in mind that many would consider ear protection/isolation or high quality/custom earplugs to be a much ...


2

AJ offers one possible (and certainly plausible) point of trouble with your setup. I might add another. You have a number of things interconnected. Any one of those things can introduce your buzzing sound. You could have... House wiring issues with improper grounding Poor cables suffering from EM ingress A ground loop occurring between anything plugged ...


2

You need to get a professional sound card to get rid of that sound. It has to do with line issues with the power isolation on your DAC. The computer produces lots of variations in power level as it operates and that results in power fluctuations to the DAC. Those fluctuations result in changes in signal output which you hear as that whine. It can often ...


2

I would say that it does depend on the brand, and the hardware used. I can tell you that Bose QC15s and QC3s actively cancelled out background hum and noise when activated even when there was no signal through the input cable. The system remained active indefinitely until turned off. I would expect these days however that some brands may have 'auto-off' ...


2

To be honest, it would take longer & be more effort to attempt to get your playback exactly out of phase with the beep than it would to take a large hammer & go find where it's coming from;-) Seriously - it's theoretically possible, but highly impractical.


2

For there to be any chance of 'subtraction' to work, there must be a phase-relationship between the two signals, which there is not likely to be in any of the cases you suggest. To understand why there is no phase relationship, consider the fact that with AC the voltage varies between a positive value (where the electrons travel in one direction) and a ...


1

You should investigate the overlap-add technique of merging your audio buffers. It sounds to me that the buffers are windowed but are possibly just played out in sequence, causing the 'vibration' you refer to. Using an overlap add technique you should be able to smooth this out. Also check out the code for 'paulstretch' as this uses a similar synthesis ...


1

Surprised nobody here has mentioned actual denoising algorithms. If you can't remove the source of the noise or can't re-record what you already have, look into effects such as izotope rx and edison. Even Audacity, which is free, has a noise reduction algorithm. You've highlighted a section of the pure noise, which is what is fed to the algorithm as an ...


1

If your audio allows for source separation and you can phase reverse one channel, then you may be able to remove sound that is in both channels - it really only works well with very defined audio position. Noise cancellation is unlikely to help here - it can reduce periodic noise, or certain forms of interference, but if they are at higher level than the ...


1

Yes sortof maybe. Special plug ins can help a lot depending on the exact problem. The only correct thing to do is to get a better recording. Teach the speaker/vocalist how to use the mike to avoid breath sounds. Use a quiet room to avoid ancillary sounds. Noise reduction works quite well to remove hissy type noise but other sounds, NOT properly called ...


1

I doubt you will get an acceptable result with a simple gate setup: while you may get rid of low volume breathing sounds, it will also chop away natural endings. Noise reduction plugins with noise profile capture functionality tend to distort the audible material too - making it sound cheap and wobbly. I can strongly recommend the DeBreath plugin by Waves:...


1

What microphone and what working distance are you using? The ultimate goal is maximizing the "Signal to Noise Ratio" (SNR) There are TWO ways of doing that, and typicaly you can use a combination of BOTH methods: MINIMIZE the external NOISE. That means blocking noise from coming into your recording space. The ONLY thing that blocks noise is MASS. Not foam, ...


1

Most likely this is the result of poor isolation of the ADC(analog to digital converter) in your laptop's audio hardware. Typically, without power conditioning, there are large amounts of variation in the power level that actually comes out of an outlet. If audio hardware is not properly isolated and conditioned, these variations in power level (which ...


1

If the mixer has a headphone (ctrl room) out, try using that instead of the mains. This is not the optimal solution, but I've had success with it in the past. Also, make try with the effects off. Sometimes these onboard FX units will generate more noise then you would like. If this is the case but you absolutely need the mixer's effects - put a noise gate ...


1

What type of earplugs are you using? If it's just cheap standard foam / wax ones, then perhaps it'd be worth investing in a higher-end ones. You can get ones that are custom-made for your own ears, that will be far more efficient than out-of-the-packet ones. There are various companies out there that offer this service - They will send you a mould kit, you ...


1

White noise etc don't cancel the sound - they tend to work by drowning out the sound. I have successfully used noisy fans to do this. It can be quite effective as your ear gets used to continuous sounds, but you may well find that the siren still cuts through. That is what a siren is designed to do: cut through the noise of traffic. Noise cancellation ...


1

Have you looked into using a noise reduction tool? There are plenty available on the market, check-out this article: best-noise-reduction-plugins


1

Since you are asking how to remove these bachelor sparrow chirps from an already existing recording I would suggest using a spectral editor like the one found in Adobe Audition or, more recently in Audacity. The manual describes the feature quite well. Basically the spectral draw of the waveform allows you to see and select the bird chirps and the editing ...


1

Buy a gun failing that, try some temporary soundproofing on the window. Higher frequencies are the easiest to dissipate. And maybe move the mic/setup around.


1

You will need to employ some EQ-kung fu of precise editing, and equalise unwanted frequencies out manualy. Try multiple very narrow bands (as opossed to a high-shelf EQing, which would hamper all the high frequencies, including recorded material), spiking the frequencies you don't want down. But it's going to be a hassle. Probablly not worth the effort IMHO, ...


1

Tetsujin has a good point with the hammer idea. Phase cancellation sounds like a cool idea in theory, but it doesn't really work in practice because sound is so chaotic once it propagates. If your cancellation signal is even slightly wrong, then it's just going to add to the annoying noise. If the sound is really annoying to you, try a white noise generator....


1

If the signal has clipped digitally there's no easy way to expand it and get it back to normal, but you're not very clear with your question. It sounds as if you've either clipped digitally or have a very low signal to noise ration, in which case you could try and use noise reducing software such as Isotope RX plug ins. Otherwise next time make sure that ...


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