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This is an awesome idea! While I don't know of another project with a similar goal, I believe it was @Jay who turned me on to this live stream of underwater sounds of the Antarctic Ocean. It doesn't address your question directly, but it does make me think of a few ideas. Perhaps instead of a lav or contact mic, you look into a hydrophone such as the H2a ...


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I guess another thing to think about is the editing or even using the file. Is there actually an editor that can open .wavs that are a year long? I think Pro Tools caps (or at least it used to) at 11 and a half hours or something similar. I'm not sure what other editor's limits are though. There might even be a way to edit large files without actually ...


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The Sound Devices 700 series recorders allow you to record directly to a hard drive via firewire. I own one myself and I can tell you that they're reliable as clockwork. Get a big enough hard drive and you could feasibly keep up with the amount of data you need. I had to check to see if wav files are still limited to 2GB, but according to Sound Devices the ...


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It might be possible to code something in Max/MSP or PureData that could handle the recording side for you on an always on computer. It would definitely take a bit of work, but you could set something to have the program run a cycle of [start and stop recording file on the hour]. It wouldn't be that hard to set up the file naming (also automatically handled ...


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For quiet birdsong, etc. a dish would be the real solution (telinga, etc.). The pcmd50 does very great job, especially for the price, but don't wait sennheiser of schoeps performance from it. With all that said, I think many-many pcm-d50 recordings went into big productions, because it is a very decent recorder, even with the built in mics. One thing you ...


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Unfortunately, this is the cost/quality dichotomy we all face, particularly when starting out (as I am also). It just can't be expected of a piece of kit costing less than a grand to perform the same as kit that will cost five times that. I'm sure you're aware of this, but I'm just stating the point. All the same, hiss isn't going to ruin the recording (...


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One thing is for sure - the formatting on SD disks is FAT32, meaning that the maximum filesize is going to be just under 4GB. SD does - however - do a good job of concatenating recordings across a number of files. I think the space constraint is more to do with the size of the volume than the size of the individual files. With a long, continuous recording, I ...


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It's an interesting question that I think can be better addressed if you define your goals a little in a little more detail. For example - what's the end use of the recordings going to be? If it's primarily to generate a spectrogram I'd suggest going mono instead of stereo to save on disk space. If it's for listening, then in what context? As a long ...


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Since this project is so ambitious, I thought I'd share some ambitious ideas to go along with it. I have only heard about them myself, and someone briefly mentioned them here, but I wonder if fiber optic mics would be useful in this scenario. They're essentially immune to noise and interference, robust, resistant to environmental changes in heat and ...


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If your budget can stretch to a bit over $200 and are certain you don't need external mics then the Sony M10 should do the job. If you need external mics and can tolerate the high self-noise when using the built-in mics, then the Zoom H4n. There are a lot of excellent recorders in the $200 - $500 range. Which one works best for you probably depends more on ...


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If you want to clean nature ambience, it depends on whether you want to remove hiss from preamps or remove atmospheric-nature sounds, which may make a nature-ambience muffled. If you record some ambience outside, you may have some ugly frequency around 1khz or lower which gives a lot of (atmospheric) noise in the ambience. Try to filter this out with an ...


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How about the Tascam DR-70D? Around $300 not as small but still easily backpack able. Noise floor specs seem respectable and less than h6 and h6 perhaps even the tascam 100mkII Any opinions anyone?


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The Olympus LS-10 has really good built in mics (for the price anyway) and can be found refurbished for about $130. You are going to have a really hard time finding anything particularly solid under the $100 mark though. It's hard to get a good mic for under $100 let alone an entire recorder. The quality you get starts going up a lot very rapidly as you ...


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For that price range you may need to consider buying used. Recorders like the Zoom H2 are nearly indestructible, record in stereo (24/96) or quad (24/48) and sound remarkably good. I use mine all the time; it's been through the wringer, dropped and dinged, broken parts and corroded mic grilles, but still going strong. (Just used it last weekend to record for ...


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stretch to the cost of a Sony PCM-M10. you will never, ever, regret it.


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There is the Zoom H1, which is around $100 and ticks most of the boxes you mention. However, I'm not sure it will produce good enough recordings of the wildlife you mention. You get what you pay for, $100 is really not sufficient to get high quality components. Add to that the narrow stereo image of the H1 (because of the xy mic setup), which makes the ...


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The EM-23s has a very nice low end and brilliant signal to noise. The capsules are not as cheap as a few bucks each (like other cheaper Primso) but they cost like 50-60 USD / capsule, then you need fet:s, then you need housing etc. but of course if you got very nice soldering skills you may do better then me =) / Pete


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Well...haven't used them, but supposedly, they use Primo electret capsules, which can Be had for just a few Bucks each. The Sony pcm m10 uses primo capsules with a noise floor similar to that of Telinga. So if you can solder, look for primo em23. Also, search taperssection.com for telinga em23 pip for more info.


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Do you know of any tested techniques for making recordings of this length, or have any other ideas on how it might be done? Yes. We've successfully recorded weeks of video plus audio on a Raspberry Pi using a WD PiDrive hard disk for storage. I've tested multiple microphones for use with the raspberry pi and only two of them would record at an acceptable ...


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This is an AWESOME idea - both the long recording of just bees, and even more so the construction of a device to make long recordings of anything and everything else. I don't think I have much to add in terms of hardware/software (PD would definitely be the way I'd go with this - not sure about the hardware, though), but I think a really interesting ...


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Interesting question: you may get more answers though if you ask it on the Nature Recordists board.......


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These two threads will provide you with a lot of great ideas. All the stuff you might need but won't find in an audio shop. What non-standard gear is an important part of your kit What are the small bits in your field recording bag?


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Obviously, you're gonna need some cables to use all that stuff. ;) I would suggest looking into decent bag for your recorder. I'm very fond of Petrol bags myself. I'd also suggest grabbing a few extra NP-type camcorder batteries and two chargers to carry around with you. The last thing you want is to run out of power. If you've got the chargers with you, ...


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A pair of 414's would be a slighly unusual thing to use in outdoors nature recording. It is more usual to use small diaphram condensor mics, as they tend to have a more neutral (less flattering) response than large diaphram mics. Trying to protect them from wind could also be quite a problem due to the size and shape of them as they won't fit into blimps ...


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