2

Construct a CD with 5-8 songs of different genres. Ones you really like the mix in and that you know well. Listen how each song performs on the monitors. Make sure the monitors are in a room that is also treated when you test them. I see the word studio, so I will assume that there is acoustic wall treatment then.


2

I would consider the most important "rule" of monitor placement to be the geometry. That is... You should have an equilateral triangle made up of the two monitors and the listening position. You should consider the tweeters to be the points from which you measure, as the higher frequencies are the most directional. As an example, for my home theater, I ...


2

I'm more of a live audio guy than recording and tend to use in-ears for my monitoring, but my understanding of the idea behind isolation pads is to absorb the vibration of the speaker and/or the surface and prevent it from impacting the sound produced by the driver. Something like a computer monitor stand is going to be more worried about providing a hard, ...


2

I think I was reasonably lucky when I bought my Mackie HR624 speakers - I just trawled the net and these seemed to be recommended the most (for my budget back in 2009 of about £500 a pair). Now I know what to look for because what follows was the first (and most important) lesson I learnt when I plugged them in: - So, I plugged them in and went straight ...


2

Have you considered just striping the balancing then? It should be simple enough to do by removing one end of the cable and wiring on a mono 1/4" jack. That would give the same feed to both (since sleeve and ring contacts will both touch sleeve on the mono jack) instead of an inverted feed on one side. Alternately, you could place a device like a Reamp (...


2

A portable line array kit with a mounting kit may be your only answer. Something like the a pair of HK AUDIO E435 with the install kit. I personally have a set in this configuration, and I've used it as house speakers/monitors combo where they were behind the performers and facing the house. There was little to no feedback from them except at the lower ...


2

Some monitors allow you to adjust the bass response for the purpose of corner placement and the like. But since you ask, I suppose yours don't have that feature. See this forum for flush/soffit mounted monitors, corner traps, ceiling clouds, Helmholtz resonators, etc. A lot to take in , but worth it. http://johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=12&sid=...


2

The biggest problem with combining your mixer and interface is that most of the cheaper options have sub-par pre-amps, which would definitely affect your quality. I would personally recommend investing in a quality audio interface (a great option would be focusrite) with solid pre-amps, and then later you could invest in a cheaper mixer.


2

"Most people have noticed that when a speaker of any size is placed against a wall, it’ll deliver stronger bass response. This can be a strong temptation to use this acoustic phenomenon (a function of standing waves) to provide some additional heft, especially from smaller (less than 8”) woofers. But this room-enhanced bass will have an uneven frequency ...


2

Old question, I know. Use an USB isolator like this: Less than 10 dollars on aliexpress. What it does: Isolate ground (lift ground) on the USB connection with isolated DC/DC converter to eliminate ground loop/noise.


2

The correct way to power up a studio is to power on the interface first, then the computer. Monitors should be powered up last. Interface should have power so that the correct protocols can be negotiated with the driver on the computer during the power-up and boot sequence. I would recommend not adjusting the monitor gains too often - you should identify ...


1

Output from the interface is either using line outs on the back or the headphone socket on the front. I suggest you use the line outputs on the back. Make up a cable to suit. TRS Female should connect: input Tip to output Tip (L) input Ring to output Tip (R) input Sleeve to output Sleeve (L & R) output plugs are 1/4" male Tip Sleeve only. input socket ...


1

Generally, open-back headphones are better for mixing purposes. There are multiple reasons for this, you accumulate too much of the sub-region in closed-back and you don't hear the sound as clear, you get ear fatigue faster with closed, and the small subtle details of a sound stand out much more with open-backs. Some of the more expensive pairs are in the ...


1

One of the best resources that deals with this subject is to be found on the site of Genelec, speaker manufacturer. https://www.genelec.com/sites/default/files/media/Studio%20monitors/Catalogues/monitor_setup_guide_2017.pdf Specifically, page 9 of this document is worth a read.


1

have you checked your energy settings? in osx with my macbook this also happens because it wants to conserve energy. shutting down the audio is a way to save energy, on unbalanced audio lines you'll hear a pop. the whine is not something i have experienced myself though.


1

That's caused by reflections off the walls interfering with the direct sound from the speaker. At some frequencies, the reflection will cancel out the direct sound, at other frequencies they will add up, so the frequency response changes from the intended one. The manual may contain some information on the intended placement of the speakers. Some ...


1

Just to clarify, I believe you are saying that you have a laptop, and a USB audio interface that goes from USB to a pair of 1/4" balanced outputs (TRS). You are now about to buy some monitors and want to know if they will work with your current setup. Assuming that your monitors have balanced inputs of some kind (either XLR or 1/4" TRS), they should work ...


1

You don't see it on consumer units because consumers don't need it enough to pay for it, nor could most of them tell the difference anyway judging by what most people's TV's & HiFi's sound like ;) Give a consumer a graphic EQ & they will just put a 'smile' on it without thinking any further. This is what I had to strap permanently over a consumer 2....


1

The comments to my question helped me troubleshoot until I found the culprit. I forget to mention in the OP that I also used a 6-foot 3.5 mm extension cable, since the monitors’ RCA cable didn’t reach on its own. I just did some testing, and trying the RCA cable without the extension eliminated the background hum, and presumably the pops as well. I’m now ...


1

Sound post as other audio production generally favors "uncolored", flat in frequency response and true sound. The idea is that the speaker system would be very truthful to the source audio and not making it sound better than it actually is or hindering problems such as overbassiness, noisiness, too much mid-range or overtrebleness. However this is not the ...


1

As Todd Wilcox said, this is a phasing issue; you're only hearing the stereo difference. Unbalanced stereo, as used by consumer-device headphone- or line-outputs, is virtually never used in the professional sector, because it often has trouble with interference (ground loops, dimmer buzz etc.). Professional mixers or active speakers have balanced inputs ...


1

The 1/4" input on the Yamaha is a mono balanced input. The 1/8" jack on your computer should be stereo, and since the Yamaha 1/4" input is balanced then it is reversing the polarity of the right channel from the computer and then mono summing that with the left channel. Any in-phase information present in both channels will be cancelled out (e.g., bass, vox, ...


1

Depending on how loud it is, this could just be normal. My Genelec speakers do the same, but it is only very low, so you need to be fairly close to really hear it. It is because they are active. Is the hiss you hear much louder than that? Does it actually affect monitoring? If so you may have something faulty, but I expect this is normal behavior. I've ...


1

You have two or maybe three options. The first is to use the tape output as a feed for your IEM. If you do this, you will get the final mix in your ear rather than just your vocal. The second option is to use the effects send. If you use the effects, then this won't be an option, but if you aren't using the effects, you can use the effects send as a ...


1

Are you examining your speakers with a sine sweep, or just your music? It is possible that the music was mastered strangely, and the monitors are just showing that to you. If the problem persists as you (slowly) sweep a sine wave from 50 Hz to 200 Hz, then you should contact KRK's technical support to see what they recommend. More on testing: What does ...


1

If your level meters are in red or there's a "clip warning" light on, then the audio is clipping or has been clipped. When digital clipping occurs it works like an absolute or ideal limiter, everything going over is limited to the maximum amplitude level and it distorts the entire signal during the clipping (basically it transforms the signal during the ...


1

speaker monitoring is as much about the room as it is about the speakers. Cheap monitors can still give decent mixes in good sounding rooms, and excellent monitors will still lie to you in poorly treated rooms - especially in the low end. headphones will lie to you with regards to relative balances and stereo fields - even good ones - because you're ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible