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This is a debate that has been going on forever. And people totally over-think this and read too many posts about specs, and phase, and mono compatibility, etc. This topic seems to be as hotly debated as religion and politics. The answer to your question is actually pretty easy: Use what sounds best to you and works best in your workflow. I often use a ...


7

It won't work. I believe that your set up is missing a key ingredient which is a bi-directional microphone. The reason M/S matrix-ing works is related to the way the "positive" and "negative" sides of the bi-directional side mic interact with the mid's signal. Because both sides of the bi-directional mic's transducer are open, it is able to record a sort of "...


4

not really. m/s technique relies on the fact the pick-up patterns between the two microphones overlap minimally. with what you're suggesting...not only will your resultant stereo-field be extremely narrow, but your going to have a lot of weird phase issue up the center of that stereo field...meaning that you're probably going to lose some of the signal that ...


3

"IN 1/2 MS MATRIX" This recording mode lets you record with mid-side (m/s) mic signals through inputs 1/2. The sub menu simply lets you adjust the relative levels of mid channel and side channel. Here is a short intro to m/s: Basically the mid signal represents the sounds that "sound" the same in both left and right side (L + R), and the side signal ...


3

Multiband Compression is not something Standard.Most of the time it's a complex procedure but you have to keep in mind that you are doing this to a whole mix which means your dB reduction should be very careful or you might kill it. That's a general guideline though , there are techniques that use aggressive/heavy compression. I would recommend reading the ...


2

IS that to record ambiences or spot effects? If its for ambiences i'd put them back to back (180º) like 3" appart I've tried it after Charles Maynes suggested it in a forum thread and liked it to. I like your idea though, should try it soon.


2

What you get here will be perceived as stereo, but it will be fake and suffer from an extreme phasing-problem in the right channel (providing it's the right channel you reverse, it normally is in M/S). What you have here is actually, except the phase-reversal part, something I've used on several occasions to make broken, phased-out, FUBAR sound effects. In ...


2

You're going to have a hard time finding a field M/S rig option cheaper than the MKH 30/40 pair...which are less expensive than a Schoeps pair. I have some of the AKG Blue Line bodies (SE300B) with cardioid and hypercardioid capsules, but I've never tried out the figure-8 capsule. I do know that it is noisier than the capsules that I do have. While in no way ...


2

What do you want to record? I like using mid-side for super directional recordings, where you want to adjust the room/place you are recording. Try recording speak with mid-side, it's really cool.


2

On the contrary, I own two blue line bodies and cardioid and hypercardioid capsules for each. They're great mics, but, yes, the stereotypical Sennheiser and Schoeps mics are definitely nicer. They do have a higher noise floor, such that I wouldn't want to use them as an M/S pair. I don't mind using them in coincident or spaced pair configurations for stereo ...


2

Yeah it would appear to work that way, but the math reveals something else: You have two channels, Left and Right, and you invert one, that is flip the sign on one channel and mix* them: Left + (- Right), or simply: L - R. What you are doing here is essentially isolating the side channel. What was equal in both channels is now removed. What is different ...


2

The MTX isn't just a matrix box that you could do on a mixer but actually the power supply of the microphone. Think it like two neumann km100 bodies for two ak20+ak40 capsules. The signals that the rsm alone is outputing or inputting from the DIN connector, according to my manual are -50 V +50 V Side Mid GND +10 V N/C So nothing like Mid Hot-Cold-GND and ...


2

It's stereo alright, but not much more. I love the Oktava 012 for many things (which I assume you are using as you mentioned the Figure Of 8-adapter), it's one of my go-to mics for several types of ambiances for one, especially when building perspective against maybe a MKH40 or a DPA 4012. But that adapter isn't very good, regretfully. For a microphone to ...


2

I'd go with the cardioid, it's more versatile. for example if you'd buy a second 8040 in the future you'd have lots of options for useful setups: Double MS, MS + spot-mic, XY, ORTF, AB and so forth. Many ambiences sound a lot better/wider/real recorded in setups that consist of spaced mics, like ORTF or AB. Just an opinion of course...


2

Firstly, align your mixing environment to a technical level using pink noise and a sound pressure level meter. There are various articles on how to do this .... for example. Secondly, listen to lots of reference material at a set known mix volume level and train your ears to get used to hearing familiar material in this environment. Then when you know ...


2

Mid side is a great technique when you want to capture a wider spread of instruments. For some, it is a pseudostereo image that sounds unnatural and to others its another useful technique to have up your sleave. It all depends on your taste and which sounds best to your ears. Reading posts online will only confuse and therefore it is best to test it out for ...


1

Make use of EQ to individualize each layer and to ensure no frequency masking takes place. Utilize reverb to bring some space to the overall mix. As far as levels, use your judgement to figure out how it should balance out in comparison to other layers. This is unfortunately a broad question. If you have something specific, I would be happy to answer. Also, ...


1

My first impression (maybe because I like 90's tracks better): The first part sounds too compact. The second part is better but the lead track kills both the bass and the kick drum. I think you should go back to the musical arrangement first. Use rests in favour of side-chained limiters. Typically, the bass should play one eighth after the kick drum, for ...


1

Regarding technical differences between mid-side and XY stereo recordings: with mid-side, if you have access to the unencoded tracks (one track is your "mid" signal, the other track is your "side" signal), then you can vary the levels between the tracks to get a wider or narrower stereo spread, going all the way down to mono if you use only the mid track. (...


1

To answer your questions: 1) Yes you can pan BGs with the surround panner. Many mixers for example will pan a stereo ambience slightly into the center channel. Check your mixes in mono if you are concerned about phasing issues. It's also better to cut with well recorded stereo ambiences (without any stereo phasing issues) in the first place. 2) M/S is ...


1

A Schoeps MS pair (MK capsules with bodies) won't fit inside a mono extended ballgag unless you buy the super expensive active cables ($557 US each last I checked). There are custom Rycote solutions, but the recommended Rycote kit is the AE stereo one, which is about the size of a small watermelon. I was able to jam my MK41/8 pair into a mono size 2, but ...


1

As a purely practical matter, in my experience recording with Zoom M/S and X/Y, if there is a lot of crowd noise to the sides and in back of the mic, X/Y will have less of it in the recording. One thing that is important to consider when getting theoretical about mic patterns is the off-axis response. Two patterns that have a certain relationship in their ...


1

I'll weigh in fromm a purely non-technical perspective. I have been recording location choral / orchestral concerts for years and love the sound of MS. Clients do as well. It just gives this beautiful spacial ambience I find difficult to capture with XY. The comments about being able to control the stereo image are dead on. That is another nice feature of ...


1

Without meaning to denigrate your question, there is no point in asking is "X" better than "Y" when it comes to mic technique (among other things); the source decides what technique you should use. Breaking it down to a list of pros and cons doesn't account for the salient and hard to define characteristic that a specific mic technique will lend a recording. ...


1

Hi Linas, Although i think the price of a good m/s pair is pretty high, it is worth it. Let me start by answering your last question. Mics from the same manufacturer are designed to work together. In the case of the Sennheiser MKH series, the sensitivity of the mics is matched so your preamp can use almost the same gainstage for both mics whilst recording. ...


1

I agree with @Miles & @Shaun, you need a bi-directional or to be more precise a microphone with a figure 8 pattern. If you invert or flip 1-channel of the cardioid or omni and summate with the original you will end up with +1-1=0, so all you would hear in your arrangement would be the signal from the hypercard.


1

I personally think discrete stereo sounds pretty good - try it out! Kind of like how Tim Prebble sometimes records ambiences - see his photos of how he records on his blog. If you space out the mics pretty far from each other I think it would work fine. http://www.musicofsound.co.nz/blog/samoa-field-recording-03-night-and-day Correct me if I'm wrong, but he ...


1

no - the point of the fig-8 in an MS pair is that one side is completely out of phase with the other.


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