5

Those are DIN connectors. DIN line-level signals expect a different impedance than is usual for RCA or XLR connections. IIRC you can put a resistor in series to convert to RCA. I'm not sure what signal level and impedance DIN microphones use. I'll see what I can dig up. It looks like this is a dictation microphone. One of the connectors allows you to ...


4

What you are looking for is a Dugan automixer. This can be acquired as either a hardware processing device, as software inside an existing hardware device such as a mixer, or as a VST plugin. I strongly don't recommend you attempt to re-engineer the Dugan algorithm with discrete plugins - this will be re-inventing the wheel and will ultimately fail as ...


3

Referencing both manuals for the Snowball Blue Microphone (and this manual) which provide similar information with different descriptions of the settings, this switch controls the pickup pattern, Position 1, Setting: Cardioid (capsule), Applications: speech, vocals, podcasting Picks up sound from the front, ideal for podcasting, game streaming or recording ...


3

frequencies above what microphone allows Microphones have a frequency response curve. This is a random example: The exact shape of the diagram is different for each microphone, but they all have one thing in common: the response will be as close to flat as possible in the range we're usually interested in (20 Hz- 20 kHz for full-range audio microphones), ...


2

Usually the best mics to capture very localized sounds are the so-called "shotgun mics", condenser microphones with a Super-Cardioid polar pattern, like the Rode NTG-2.


2

Cardioid condensor which is most likely positioned just out of frame.


2

Distance is your key. Do not record too close to the organ or it will sound very weak. The larger/louder the instrument, the further away you would want to place the mic array. You want to balance the distance so that you are getting an even balance of reverberant sound and direct sound from the organ. Of course, if you were recording a chamber organ, then ...


2

Rode has now a device which allows to plug in microphones which need to be powered by power usually provided by smartphones (2.7v) through TRRS such as Rode's Lavalier Go or Shure's MVL/A to a USB sound card or any mic entry using XLR. This is Rode VXLR+. The XLR has to provide 12-48V phantom power. From Rode's site: The VXLR+ is a 3.5mm female TRS ...


1

This isn't going to be possible. The power-adapter unit that sits between the connector and the mic is where the power comes from. It is not going to be possible to bypass this. Bear in mind that the TRRS connector is wired primarily to provide microphone input to a smartphone. The "Left and Right" (TR) is likely not connected to anything at all.


1

For this sort of application you probably want a mixing desk that can handle automixing - something like a Yamaha QL-1 which has an in-built Dugan Automixer. This will significantly help with the noise-floor. Also you need to look and see how the mics are being used. IF the microphones are a long way from the subjects, then you will definitely get noise ...


1

You will need an XLR connector to plug into the Yamaha interface for the phantom power to reach the mike. A TRS connector or adaptor to 3.5mm will not do it.


1

Mono shotgun style mics are not appropriate microphones for ambience recording. The best mic technique is stereo spaced omnidirectional condenser mics with appropriate wind protection. Other typical ambience techniques include the use of ambisonic mics and coincident M/S pairs. Spaced A/B and Coincident techniques give a very different sound which usually ...


1

You are probably experiencing latency through both the mic and all the processing. This is a recording mic, not so much a 'live' mic that you will want to listen to while you are recording. Just record the voice directly and don't worry about listening to the audio while you are recording. Audition the audio once you have finished. You are possibly ...


1

Yes, you can use an external microphone preamplifier, these convert the mic signal to line level.


1

Nature recording is a really tricky place to start with cheap gear, as ambiences tend to be reasonably quiet and cheap gear nearly always has a high noise floor! I've found most quiet nature ambiences I've recorded with a handheld recorder either with the built in mics or external mics are almost unusable because of the noisefloor. One response is to get ...


1

This is fairly easy IF you are wanting to use a maximum of two headphone / mic combinations. We call this combination a "Headset". You will need to build two identical circuits as follows: Each headset's circuit contains a mic preamp and a headphone amplifier. The preamp design depends on whether you are using a headset with a dynamic mic or electret mic....


1

I'm going to cut to the chase and keep this really simple for you. Firstly, you don't really need to worry too much about the overall recorded sound in a practise environment as you should only be concerned with the overall performance and interpretation at this stage. So really we need to discuss the recorded sound either in a recording session situation ...


1

There's a whole lot of misunderstanding going on in your question… … what's going to disappoint you still further is even when you get to the end of this rambling essay, you're still not going to have a definitive answer. That's because you could write entire books on the subject [& people have]. Firstly, though the lowest fundamental on a regular ...


1

Røde make one - the VXLR+ - it also converts the voltage required for phantom power. Example from just the first store I found one - https://www.thomann.de/gb/rode_vxlr_416774.htm Plug adapter with power converter TRS Mini-jack (3.5 mm) to XLR 3M Integrated voltage converter from phantom power (12 - 48 V) to plug-in power (3 - 5 V) Allows ...


1

The output of the pc is going to be at a voltage level (line level) that is way higher than the phone is expecting (mic level). You need an 'attenuator' between the pc and the phone that will drop the level by between 30dB and 40dB. If you are savvy with electronics, you can build an attenuator with a few resistors.


1

This is basically going to take you into the realm of Audio over IP. There is really only one game in town for this sort of application, which is Dante. (www.audinate.com) There are other players, but you are really going to want to approach this from a standards perspective. You will need some Dante termination adapters (ethernet to XLR) which you can (I ...


1

Firstly, the best result will be one where the final product is stereo. Basically in an environment such as this you are actually going to be recording two 'instruments'. The violin The room Both require consideration and treatment in the mix. The easiest solution from a controllability perspective would be a spaced pair of omnidirectional microphones to ...


1

latency depends on a number of things, but primarily it is determined by your audio hardware driver buffer size. As you increase your buffer size, you do a couple of things: 1 reduce overall CPU usage 2 increase latency. As you reduce your buffer size, you... 1 increase overall CPU load 2 reduce latency. So there is always a tradeoff between CPU load ...


1

The hiss sounds like some induction coming out of your PC (power supply, CPU, graphics card). I have heard this kind of noise a couple of times when using cheap USB sound cards. Maybe you can hear some changes moving your mouse or opening/closing windows on the PC.


1

You need a cable that has four connections. Ground, L, R and mic. This will need to split to two connectors - one stereo connector and one connector for the mic as usually, on PC's the mic connector is seperate. IF you can, try and find a way of using the bluetooth interface for everything - that will give you a better chance of making it work.


1

This sounds like a bad mic capsule to me. However, it could also be caused by a bad phantom power source or bad preamp, and so you'll need to do some troubleshooting to figure out which one. Can you borrow or purchase (with a return policy) another mic to try? Are you plugging it into a video camera (the mic's intended use) or something else?


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