5

First off… pros don't just decide they want to turn their amp up halfway through a gig. That's what sound crews are for; there's one guy whose job it is to make sure everyone on stage can hear themselves clearly. That aside, at a large gig it wouldn't make the slightest difference front of house. There's not really a great deal of the actual amp's volume ...


3

In almost all microphone designs, it's quite simply because that's the way the diaphragm faces. A hand-held mic has the diaphragm set at 90° to the body, so you point it at the sound. pic: https://www.soundguys.com/shure-sm7b-review-28438/ The standard large diaphragm condenser as in your photos has it in line with the body, so the pickup pattern is ...


3

There are as many ways to mic a piano as there are sound engineers. Using what you have, here are some ideas - this is not comprehensive, it's just to get you thinking outside the box. With all of these, distance from source can make huge differences in the end result. Your room might sound far more reverberant than you expect once you start miking up. You ...


3

The Scarlett has a pre amp built into it. Most likely the issue is the distance you have the microphone from your mouth. An SM57 is not ideal for podcast recording because you will need the microphone inches from your mouth, as well as dealing with proximity effect. You would benefit more from a condenser microphone than an external preamp.


2

It's a logarithmic scale. You get the same situation in many things - buying a car, or a camera, or a guitar or violin. You can get crap for cheap. Double your money & you can quickly get to 'pretty good'. From there it's a logarithmic scale, every time you double your money you get maybe 10% better. By the time you get to truly outstanding you're ...


2

There are some USB audio adapters which provide 5 or 7 channel output on 3.5mm TRS sockets. Those tend to have microphone inputs with bias voltage on them, too. Only problem is that the quality is not better than that of the average microphone input on a laptop. As a rule: anybody who has the temerity to provide a 3.5mm phone socket for a microphone will ...


2

The manual for this device states it provides stereo line out (>250mV) on a pair of RCA (phono) connectors. If the microphone signal is routed to the line out you can record that with no need for a receiver. (I'd expect the microphone signal should be available on the line out but the "manual" is very short on details.) The microphones are VHF ...


1

Dynamic mics don't really have any measurable SNR. The hiss you can hear is going to be from your gain stages, not the mic itself. See https://service.shure.com/s/article/what-are-the-noise-specs-for-a-dynamic-mic-like-the-sm58?language=en_US


1

You are approaching this from the wrong direction. You are not going to be able to successfully reverse engineer this RF link. Could be any frequency, even 2.4GHz. Could be any modulation. You are not going to be able to find out without a significant amount of effort. Solution is to replace the RF link with your own. Give the talent a different radio mic, ...


1

I do not recommend large diaphragm mics for piano as they do not have the required characteristics. Mics similar to Schoeps Collette will do nicely. The resonance you are seeking won't come from the mics, they will come from the room and the piano. Room and floor are just as important in achieving the result as the piano itself. A good pair for start would ...


1

Welcome to Sound Design. Your co-host will need to use headphones/earpods, etc to stop your voice interfering with their voice. You can use a TRRS splitter to combine the microphone and headphone leads. There are plenty around but as you're using a Rode mic they make the SC6 for TRRS inputs or the SC6L for lightning inputs.


1

No microphone can differentiate between different types of sound, only different frequencies. Human ears have a brain adapted to picking out one sound amongst others, but microphones cannot do this. Some element of AI processing would need to be done. If you're dealing with a pure sine at one specific frequency, that task might be easier, but there will ...


1

If you're getting an external USB audio interface, get one that supports phantom power [48v]. The Shure [& many other pro-level lav mics] comes with interchangeable adaptors for connectivity to different manufacturers' body packs etc as well as 'regular' XLR. If you don't need to consider wireless integration, then XLR is the 'safe option'. I can't find ...


1

You can't only talk about the diaphragms with microphones you also have to include the preamplification and circuitry but that's a very technical discussion compared to what I think you're asking... Mixing and producing records is about storing all the sounds and timbres that you can create in your brain and using the best combination of these for the task ...


1

Array mics (dual or otherwise) are like smaller versions of multi-mic setups. Using the differences in the two (or more) audio signals, a digital signal processor (DSP) can automatically figure out the difference between the main signal and any background noise. Laptops tend to use these for noise-cancelling during video conferencing calls. A digital mic is ...


1

Why not use a lighting umbrella, straight into a light stand - made for each other. Random picture from Google… The lighting clamps generally come with adaptors &/or inserts so they'll fit a mic stand thread [either size], or otherwise they'll just drop right over the end of a standard mic stand & clamp to the straight rod underneath. …or… gaffa ...


1

These days this is a simple task, using specialist software like Izotope RX. However, simple is not cheap;) Audacity has something along those lines, but I've no idea how good it is - https://manual.audacityteam.org/man/noise_reduction.html


1

Timbre is a general term for the properties of any sound. In the case of the human voice, what makes a person recognisable and distinct from other people are the "formants" created by the vocal tract. These regions in the frequency spectrum that are accentuated by resonance in the throat and mouth, give a voice a particular sound. They enable us to ...


1

Looks like a K6 + ME 66 Sennheiser system. https://en-us.sennheiser.com/k6-modular-microphone-system-omni-directional-cardioid-short-gun-long-gun


1

Let me approach this by sneaking up on it from a different direction:) Take a bass guitar. Low E is about 41Hz. Most people know what that sounds like & how it works when you hear it on records, etc. Let's take a famous example. Queen - Another One Bites the Dust. Now this famous opening bass riff to all intents & purposes is in F - though if you ...


1

Tetsujin is 100% correct for most bands at most venues. However...My usual band set up has almost no speakers on stage. We try to put all our sound through DI to FoH directly, with small monitors (either wedges for guitars or in-ear for bass/vox) where possible. Which means we can talk to each other on stage at normal volume. In venues where this isn't ...


1

My immediate thought was that you have the mic backwards. It is an extremely common mistake and this is a perfect description of what it sounds like when you have it backwards. If you are not sure there are a few ways to find out. One way would be to hold a flashlight up to the mic and look into the mesh of the mic itself and see if you can make out the ...


1

I've tried many combinations to surmount the problem you've mentioned when recording to my Nikon Z50. And here are my observations: With the Camera's inbuilt mic - If the room is quiet & the camera (camera's inbuilt mic) is close to the speaker (within approx half a meter,) and the mic setting on camera is on manual gain then the sound quality is pretty ...


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