15

Referencing both manuals for the Snowball Blue Microphone (and this manual) which provide similar information with different descriptions of the settings, this switch controls the pickup pattern, Position 1, Setting: Cardioid (capsule), Applications: speech, vocals, podcasting Picks up sound from the front, ideal for podcasting, game streaming or recording ...


11

If you're not using any aftermarket audio hardware, and just recording from the line-in on the computer, you already have the bare minimum to record two channels at once. That line-in is likely stereo, i.e., a left channel and a right channel. Or, more appropriately for your purposes, a 2-channel input. Microphones are all mono (save a few specialty ...


10

Well, it depends! The first important consideration: what style do you play / wish to record? For a classical performance, you need quite a different sound than for a folky dance tune, a jazzy improvisation or even a rock or metal lead role. The main part of the differences in sound is the room component. For a classical recording, you want a good-sounding ...


9

I have recently run across this exact issue and have found the answer so thought I'd share. PC microphones are a type of "electret" microphone which is essentially a specific type of unbalanced condenser microphone which requires a +5v potential applied across the middle pin, also called "Plug-in power." Pin 1 is ground, pin 2 is +5v and pin 3 is the "hot" ...


8

You need a pop filter if the mic is in a direct line in front of your mouth - whether you buy one, or stretch a piece of material over a frame in front, put a sock over it, whatever. You don't need one if the mic is off to one side, so you can never breathe or 'pop' directly into it. This would require lifting the high frequencies to compensate; so would ...


8

It's not the ear can can differentiate a voice from background, it's the brain. It can use the minute differences in timing that a sound arrives at each ear (known as the Haas or Precedence Effect) to precisely place a sound source in space, & we are so attuned to picking out conversation that a human voice is easily differentiated & understood. ...


7

Deep and resonant with less sharpness sounds like you want to put the mic underneath the piano pointing up at the sound board. You'll probably want to move it around down there and experiment with how it sounds in different places pointed towards different parts of the sound board. I'd start off pointed toward the bridge in the middle of the board, ...


7

It's a modular system. You need the microphone module, which you have, and the power module, which you apparently don't have. According to Sennheiser documentation you need the K6 or K6P power module. http://en-us.sennheiser.com/directional-microphone-shotgun-film-broadcast-me-66


7

The response curves are for each of the three selectable roll-off switch positions... Flat –6 dB/octave below 100 Hz –18 dB/octave below 80 Hz From the spec sheet - Low Frequency Response Switch Positions Flat; –6 dB/octave below 100 Hz; –18 dB/octave below 80 Hz


6

It's true that LDCMs are more sensitive, but that's in practise not such a big concern – good SDCMs already have plenty of headroom, usually the noise floor is well below any ambient noise even for chamber music room applications. Of course, the diaphragm mustn't be too small, cheap mics with less than a centimetre usually won't do. But they still beat ...


6

I don't think it's coming from your microphone because there is a small stereo width to the noise at all frequencies. The microphone can only produce perfectly mono sounds. Here's an enhanced spectrum of the noise: - Very noticeable are the sequence of peaks at precisely 1kHz, 2kHz, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (not 8), 9, 10, 11, 12kHz etc.... These are very unlikely to ...


6

This is probably a better question for Sound.SE, but anyway: A good vocalist will be aware of their mic placement (it becomes habit pretty quick). In "loud" genres, rock for example, as an engineer, you typically want the mic very close the vocalist's mouth. The closer the vocalist (and louder the vocalist), the less gain you require, which improves your ...


6

It would be very unusual for equipment to put phantom power out to TRS inputs. One reason is that connecting an unbalanced TS connector would shorten one line with phantom power but not the other, resulting in a high bias voltage for whatever equipment. Another is that TRS sockets are forming connections almost nilly-willy when plugging in which makes them ...


6

Since you need natural sounding stereophonic sound, you would need two cardioid mics set up as a near coincident pair. There are actually two ways of doing this, the French (ORTF) and the Dutch (NOS). They both provide wide stereo image which I think will make the recording more interesting and atmospheric. As far as using a dynamic or condenser set of ...


6

Those are DIN connectors. DIN line-level signals expect a different impedance than is usual for RCA or XLR connections. IIRC you can put a resistor in series to convert to RCA. I'm not sure what signal level and impedance DIN microphones use. I'll see what I can dig up. It looks like this is a dictation microphone. One of the connectors allows you to ...


5

-- edit -- this question piqued my curiousity enough that I ran a test for the tonebenders podcast. Check out the results here: https://soundcloud.com/tonebenders-podcast/017-tonebenders-listener-questions-mic-matching-with-izotopes-ozone -- edi t-- I honestly think this is a good question that's worthy of a little thoughtfulness. IMO it is possible to eq ...


5

The main difference is Sensitivity (and Noise accordingly). An LDC(Large Diaphragm Condenser) is more sensitive than an SDC(Small Diaphragm Condenser), and also tends to generate a higher output voltage, given the same input SPL. Why the LDC is more sensitive? Remember that a condenser mic is made of a conductive diaphragm next to a conductive backplate. ...


5

If you want high quality, then don't use a digital audio recorder as your microphone. Get a good condenser mic, a sound hole mic or a mic you can mount in the sound chamber of the guitar itself and then if you need more reverb you can use a traditional effects unit or effects petal depending on if you are using a powered mic or not.


5

Your friend is probably talking about one of the Sennheiser MKH mics. Possibly the 416 or the MKH40. These are great mics, but are perhaps overkill for what you are proposing to use them for. Often people use these because they are recording at extremes and need the low noise (such as recording quiet atmos at night) or the resilience these mics have. For ...


5

It's worth noting that many mics actually have a pop filter built-in, in particular live vocal mics such as the SM58. Such filters generally don't work as good as a proper external lollipop-screen, meaning they take away more treble. (The main difference is, foam absorbs more sound than light fabric.) But for speech, this isn't actually such a big deal: most ...


5

If you are on a budget you might want to give the Blue Microphones Yeti a try. It has switchable pick up patterns on it one of with it polar which will pick up 360 degrees around the mic. It's USB so it should be able to interface with Skype with no problem at all.


5

I would go with 2-4 goosenecked clip microphones positioned in top and bottom of each sound source, something like this: The important thing here is that the mics stay at a fixed position, so you will not get varying levels as you play and move around, as with a mic on a stand. The DPA 4099 series would be a good choice. They actually made an accordion ...


5

The suspect area is the ¼" jack & ¼" - ⅛" adaptor. It needs to be correctly wired as a mic input to that specific jack socket, which on a Mac is a 4-pole connector, TRRS, for headset/mic combos. I can't see the whole TR[R]S to be able to guess, but even if it is correct, the mono Shure TS jack is going to be shorting the connections inside the ⅛" ...


5

Rode has now a device which allows to plug in microphones which need to be powered by power usually provided by smartphones (2.7v) through TRRS such as Rode's Lavalier Go or Shure's MVL/A to a USB sound card or any mic entry using XLR. This is Rode VXLR+. The XLR has to provide 12-48V phantom power. From Rode's site: The VXLR+ is a 3.5mm female TRS ...


5

Let me start by addressing the lack of microphones that can do this. There isn't one. We have specialized highly directional microphones that can pick up very specific points at fairly long distances, however they require being very carefully aimed. The area that a microphone picks up sound from is called the pickup pattern. Most consumer mics (and many ...


5

If you're specifically after something that's versatile, the Shure SM57 is the best microphone you'll find for that budget. It can be used for pretty much anything, it sounds good live and in the studio. Even big budget studios and concerts still use them for snare drums, guitar cabs, and vocals. The more important factor you should be considering is ...


5

I think you are working to a false premise. It is not actually the sensitivity of the microphone that is they key to this - you can take any half decent mic & keep turning it up. Sure, there will be some noise floor, but this is almost irrelevant. What is different is perception. The human ear is controlled by the human brain. Aside from the fact that ...


5

First off… pros don't just decide they want to turn their amp up halfway through a gig. That's what sound crews are for; there's one guy whose job it is to make sure everyone on stage can hear themselves clearly. That aside, at a large gig it wouldn't make the slightest difference front of house. There's not really a great deal of the actual amp's volume ...


4

Is there an chance that you can ADR your questions later (in post)? If yes, I'd attach the two lavs to the 2 people in front of the camera, since they are the point of interest and record your questions in post production. While doing the actual interview you could place a smartphone (or dictaphone,etc.) unobtrusive nearby yourself. Nobody will notice ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible