11

Miniaturization. Like this: Scientists create the world's tiniest 'ear'. Pick up sound from stuff that we can't even hear with our own ears. Or (self-powered, wireless) mics that are so small that you can put them literally everywhere. 2D Microphone arrays Like this: New super microphone can hear you in a crowded stadium So you can focus on sound, even ...


11

If you're not using any aftermarket audio hardware, and just recording from the line-in on the computer, you already have the bare minimum to record two channels at once. That line-in is likely stereo, i.e., a left channel and a right channel. Or, more appropriately for your purposes, a 2-channel input. Microphones are all mono (save a few specialty ...


10

Well, it depends! The first important consideration: what style do you play / wish to record? For a classical performance, you need quite a different sound than for a folky dance tune, a jazzy improvisation or even a rock or metal lead role. The main part of the differences in sound is the room component. For a classical recording, you want a good-sounding ...


9

To answer your last question... " do I have a chance of producing something of even intermediate quality with what I have in my "arsenal"?", the answer is yes...Sound Design really only requires three things... two ears and a brain, and I'm going to assume that the fact that you are here and asking these questions puts you in possession of all three! :) ...


9

I think your main issue with understanding this is that you're looking at it from too simplified a view. Frequency response curves can only be so accurate, and even within a manufactured line of a particular mic by a particular company there may be slight variations. Polar response is not identical between two different model microphones (even though they'...


8

Hi Rodrigo, I did that recording. (your link is broken btw. Here's the link.) the mic is a Rode NT5 plugged into a stethoscope that I modified using a rubber end to a chair cap. Stethoscopes are really just the main chest pieces connected to some rubber tubing. Here are a couple of pics: I got the idea from some diego stocco vids. The key is ...


8

A lot's been said about compression but nothing's been said about intelligibility. If you're producing VOs, trails, bumpers, idents or jingles with vocals over a bed, EQ is also your friend here. If you critically listen to professional productions, they often lowpass AND highpass music under speech in addition to heavily compressing and EQing the vocals. ...


7

From my observations, these are the most used MS pairs in field recording: Sennheiser MKH 40 or 50 (or 8040 or 8050) paired with an MKH 30 or MKH 800 Schoeps CMC bodies with MK4 or MK41 capsules paired with an MK8 Schoeps CCM4 or CCM41 paired with a CCM8 Neumann KM100 bodies with AK40 or AK50 capsules paired with an AK20 There are also single stereo MS ...


7

Hi guys, well here's a tip for you. Ive been using a Nuemann KMR81i for 90% of foley recording. Been doing foley for more than 25 years, so have tried it all. The 416 was the standard many years ago but it does have a nasty kick around 3k which really bites with chains, keys or foot grit, the KMR 81i is much warmer. The 416 is what I use for location foley ...


7

Just add a compressor on your voice-over. Set the ratio to 2:1. Set a middle long release and a bit faster attack. (Or auto if you have it.) Then you lower the threshold until it gets better. Just play with the ratio and threshold until you get it right. What the compressor does is that if the audio gets over the threshold in volume it will wait the number ...


7

You need a pop filter if the mic is in a direct line in front of your mouth - whether you buy one, or stretch a piece of material over a frame in front, put a sock over it, whatever. You don't need one if the mic is off to one side, so you can never breathe or 'pop' directly into it. This would require lifting the high frequencies to compensate; so would ...


7

Deep and resonant with less sharpness sounds like you want to put the mic underneath the piano pointing up at the sound board. You'll probably want to move it around down there and experiment with how it sounds in different places pointed towards different parts of the sound board. I'd start off pointed toward the bridge in the middle of the board, ...


7

It's a modular system. You need the microphone module, which you have, and the power module, which you apparently don't have. According to Sennheiser documentation you need the K6 or K6P power module. http://en-us.sennheiser.com/directional-microphone-shotgun-film-broadcast-me-66


7

It's not the ear can can differentiate a voice from background, it's the brain. It can use the minute differences in timing that a sound arrives at each ear (known as the Haas or Precedence Effect) to precisely place a sound source in space, & we are so attuned to picking out conversation that a human voice is easily differentiated & understood. ...


7

The response curves are for each of the three selectable roll-off switch positions... Flat –6 dB/octave below 100 Hz –18 dB/octave below 80 Hz From the spec sheet - Low Frequency Response Switch Positions Flat; –6 dB/octave below 100 Hz; –18 dB/octave below 80 Hz


6

I would like to see something along the lines of a version of the laser microphones that many intelligence organizations use for surveillance made for audio applications with a focusable field. I can think of many potential uses, one being as a long distance contact mic for capturing source from things that are too dangerous or physically difficult to get to ...


6

The job of a foam screen is to attenuate the velocity of wind before it hits the microphone. If you don't reduce the wind, then the mic will be overdriven, and you will get a badly distorted signal. You can't just filter that out after the fact. This is also why an analog compressor or a digital compressor with a lot of headroom is a good idea between your ...


6

It's true that LDCMs are more sensitive, but that's in practise not such a big concern – good SDCMs already have plenty of headroom, usually the noise floor is well below any ambient noise even for chamber music room applications. Of course, the diaphragm mustn't be too small, cheap mics with less than a centimetre usually won't do. But they still beat ...


6

Fred42Vid's answer is good (though the 1/4" jack is probably a balanced TRS). I wanted to add something, though; on a mixer, when you have both a TRS and an XLR, they sometimes have subtly different signal paths. Specifically, the microphone input is often run through a second op-amp to boost its signal by about 20dBu before the main gain stage (controllable ...


6

I don't think it's coming from your microphone because there is a small stereo width to the noise at all frequencies. The microphone can only produce perfectly mono sounds. Here's an enhanced spectrum of the noise: - Very noticeable are the sequence of peaks at precisely 1kHz, 2kHz, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (not 8), 9, 10, 11, 12kHz etc.... These are very unlikely to ...


6

This is probably a better question for Sound.SE, but anyway: A good vocalist will be aware of their mic placement (it becomes habit pretty quick). In "loud" genres, rock for example, as an engineer, you typically want the mic very close the vocalist's mouth. The closer the vocalist (and louder the vocalist), the less gain you require, which improves your ...


6

Since you need natural sounding stereophonic sound, you would need two cardioid mics set up as a near coincident pair. There are actually two ways of doing this, the French (ORTF) and the Dutch (NOS). They both provide wide stereo image which I think will make the recording more interesting and atmospheric. As far as using a dynamic or condenser set of ...


5

Sennheiser MKH 40 Sennheiser MKH 30 Rycote suspension w/ pistol grip Rycote Stereo Windshield size AE Rycote Stereo Windjammer Rycote Stereo Connbox Rycote MS stereo mic clips Boom pole of your choice The only alternative I'd consider is a Schoeps MS rig, but $4k will barely cover the capsules and power supplies. But equally sweet, for different reasons. ...


5

A couple of thoughts. Go to a trade show like AES or NAB. Many of the dealers have mics set up on the floor feeding a preamp with headphones. Also, a few dealers will lend out demo mics for you to check out. That being said, field recording and sound design is such a niche field, that there is no way to check out all of the gear before you buy. I bought my ...


5

People say this a lot but listen (analyse) to the different mediums where sound design is used. I'm no expert but when I'm listening I ask myself why that sound is used as pretty much everything you hear was a conscious choice, I always try to keep that in mind. Also many sounds sound alike, think about what you think it sounds like and how you would create ...


5

-- edit -- this question piqued my curiousity enough that I ran a test for the tonebenders podcast. Check out the results here: http://www.tonebenders.net/tonebenders-episode-seventeen-questions-ozone-and-plural-eyes/ -- edi t-- I honestly think this is a good question that's worthy of a little thoughtfulness. IMO it is possible to eq one mic's ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible