7

You need a pop filter if the mic is in a direct line in front of your mouth - whether you buy one, or stretch a piece of material over a frame in front, put a sock over it, whatever. You don't need one if the mic is off to one side, so you can never breathe or 'pop' directly into it. This would require lifting the high frequencies to compensate; so would ...


5

It's worth noting that many mics actually have a pop filter built-in, in particular live vocal mics such as the SM58. Such filters generally don't work as good as a proper external lollipop-screen, meaning they take away more treble. (The main difference is, foam absorbs more sound than light fabric.) But for speech, this isn't actually such a big deal: most ...


5

I would go with 2-4 goosenecked clip microphones positioned in top and bottom of each sound source, something like this: The important thing here is that the mics stay at a fixed position, so you will not get varying levels as you play and move around, as with a mic on a stand. The DPA 4099 series would be a good choice. They actually made an accordion ...


4

As I recall, Richard King used lavs (or maybe contact mics?) mounted on the guns the get an interesting POV for Inception when recording with John Fasal and Eric Potter. Than again, they were recording more of the usual suspects (Glock, SIG-Sauer, Colt, etc) and it likely captured the mechanics of shell ejects. I personally haven't worked with/recording ...


4

Honestly, I just use whatever I have - even if all I have is mono. Never let the equipment get in the way of a good roomtone (or for that matter, ambience). I certainly agree with @Guido that high quality gear is best suited for roomtone to obtain the most robust S/N, but beyond that, I'm pretty loose about this type of recording. Roomtone is one of those ...


4

Sounds like fun. If you can get your hands on/rent a Nagra, the sound of overdriving the tape will bring something special to the party. It's a bit of a pain to set up and run, but it squashes the dynamics of a gun in a really nice/meaty way. Much like recording a drumset on a 2 inch Studer. I recently did a gun shoot and put an AKG D112 dynamic near the ...


4

A bit of feedback for those interested - I didn't actually get as much time to put into this as I'd of liked, but did get a couple of interesting recordings: Both of these were recorded in areas of quite powerful water movement, my idea of recording ambient sound from more tranquil pools didn't ...


4

There are a few possible reasons. If you see just two identical mics it's for coverage and diversity -- to get a good signal no matter where the speaker faces, to shape the pickup pattern. If you see multiple different mics it's usually because the venue didn't provide a 'gang box', a splitter that can supply feeds to many different sources, or one or more ...


4

Shotguns help, but they do not 100% isolate anything. The main way to "isolate" a sound in the field is with distance. You want to get as far away from undesired noises and as close to desired noises as possible. The difference with a shotgun is that when you aim it correctly, it gives you more flexibility on the distance, but it doesn't completely isolate ...


4

Things Tubes, straws, pipes and hoses Cups Put things in mouth (e.q. water or sweets... don't choke!) Pillows Balloons (scream all you can while pressing a balloon to the mouth) Combs and paper, foil etc. Moving Fans Vibrator on throat Tubes into water Springs (toy spring mics, Thunder Drums etc) Head Shake / Rotate (poor mans leslie/tremolo) Hands ...


3

I recommend you read these two articles for more insight on M/S recording, which, by the way, I absolutely recommend you do: http://designingsound.org/2013/10/charles-maynes-on-mid-side-recording/ http://designingsound.org/2014/02/la-underground-an-interview-with-charles-maynes/ And as as addendum, I would say that, so long as you have extra channels or ...


3

lavs are always fun, so i'll second that. I'd also try some pzm mics for low end and amb. Also, I'm very interested in seeing how ribbon mics fare in weaponfire situations. (its a common misconception that high spls damage ribbons - in fact its wind turbulence that does.) I think a nice ribbon blumeline setup could potentially yield some really nice stuff....


3

It's not entirely clear what setup you're talking about, but I'll discuss both options. The mics are basically at the same spot, just offset a bit to aim in directly opposite directions.This is essentially an XY pattern, with an extremely wide angle. The setup will thus work a lot like XY: quite reliable phase for mono compatibility, stereo field only from ...


3

They're not strictly necessary, but they're certainly preferable. But that doesn't mean you need to buy an actual pop filter! You can easily slip a sock or a cotton shirt over your mic and it'll have close-ish to the same effect.


2

Yes, regretfully the sound will suffer tremendously from this, which only makes it usable for telephoning and such. There are, however, as far as I know variants of this technique. Schoeps has a digital version of the CMIT-mic that allegedly can do just this, but for a single sound-source. I haven't tried it out myself, so I can't really say how well it ...


2

Tons of great ideas already, but in the end it all comes down to what you consider a satisfying result - and how many/ what kind of mics you have to work with. It's not just the mics, of course - it's also very much the room. If your room is fairly live without being ringy of resonant at certain frequencies (at the position of your mic/mics), you can use ...


2

I would go for a 2 Microphone setup. Get the best pair of condenser you can achieve. The following technique was used in early rock and roll and really worked for me a couple of times. The idea of this technique is to record the drums in mono with a strong snare and overheads to establish the rhythm. Your kick drum will lack sub frequencies with this ...


2

Maybe some binaural mics? Perhaps a pair in the ears of the armorer as they're firing like some DPA 4060's? ;)


2

Take omnidirectional microphones! In contrast do cardioids, omnidirectional microphones captures much more low end. This gives you the andvantage that your room tones will also have something in the lows instead of cardiodid records. Cardioid microphones cut's bass frequencies which is good for voice and music. For rooms, it makes it thin. In post ...


2

If it sounds good, do it. But listen back in mono to check there aren't any phase issues.


2

He was most likely worried about phasing issues, as I'm assuming you weren't doing a stereo split for a dual mic piano setup. Basically, when you have them in the center pointed out, one mic primarily picks up the lower registers and the other primarily picks up the higher registers so you don't have to worry much about phase when they are combined. If ...


2

Pop filters are necessary for anything voice related. It helps with sounds such as 'P' and 'B'; This is called plosives. Plosives is extra air going onto the microphone causeing a very annoying heavy breath/bass sound. If you care about audio quality and you want to be great at what you do, get a pop filter. You will not be disappointed.


2

Panasonic got out of the electret microphone capsule business several years ago. But certainly there are many vendors of similar commodity electret capsules out of the usual places. The Panasonic WM-6x series was legendary for a couple of reasons: They were dirt-cheap, and they had pretty flat frequency response. But they were not noted for having very ...


2

For what its worth you generally never combine inputs with out having level control even if the devices have their own level control. You generally want to have control over the level of each input and there really are no multi-input signal combining DI boxes I know of (that does not mean they don't exist though). The way I read what you are asking is that ...


2

You will need a wireless lav mic. Two manufacturers of such systems at entry level prices (as wireless can be very expensive) are Sennheiser and Shure (there are other manufacturers, of course). Now, one issue is to find the way to hide the mic under your Mark Twain clothes. You might need some training, find appropriate accessories (like gaffer tape or ...


2

If there were only a few that were coming out with lead vocals i might keep those vocals to their own channels and then the others i might put together in subgroups. With a digital desk you could put compression on all channels so i would put compressors on everything but maybe let a little more through on the vocals singing lead and maybe put them together ...


2

Once upon a time I found and brought home some lengths of plastic tubing (intended for plumbing, I imagine). They were very long - up to 3 metres - with about a 1-inch diameter. When you sang directly into one, you found your voice pulled to one of its natural harmonic pitches (the harmonic scale familiar from valveless hunting horns etc.); being so long, ...


2

Musical theatre, more often than not, uses head-worn lavalier microphones that are positioned very close to the mouth. This gives a much greater signal-to-noise ratio for the Front-of-House mixer to work with. These mics are often flesh-coloured so that they are almost impossible to see. Lavalier mounting in musical theatre is a craft that requires an ...


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