3

Sounds like a leslie speaker/cabinet. It essentially creates a tremolo effect by rotating the speaker. There is lots of info online about these, so just the term should give you a good place to start googling.


3

There is a logic to your argument, but the problem arises from the fact that there are thousands of models of consumer speaker, all with their own way of 'flattering' the sound. If you mix on one pair, it may become bass heavy on another. The idea behind studio monitors is that the sound is as neutral as possible, so that the mix will more or less be ...


2

It's based on the assumption that studio speakers sound "flat" (and it's technically true as well, because they're designed to sound flat/neutral/clinical/accurate) and thus represent "the average" of all sorts of colorizing. I.e. if the mix is done on a system that sounds "flat", then all colorizing to one direction or another will be less compared to ...


2

I don't know very much about this but here is my opinion on the subject. If you think about it, in any reverberant space, any speaker will produce 360 degrees of sound. There is a somewhat new field in audio called immersive audio. There are 3 main techniques used in this field: ambisonics, cross-talk cancellation and wavefield synthesis. Ambisonics is ...


1

It's possible, but requires expertise. You need the specifications for all of the speaker components. Then you can build a passive filter that combines a woofer and tweeter, plus a new enclosure that's tuned to the frequency response of the components you've chosen. It's much easier to replace the blown components with identical new ones. Attaching a ...


1

Placing the main speakers behind the audience would create a very unnatural feel for the audience. The sound should seem to come from the direction of the person speaking, the band, etc on the stage. Unfortunately there is no easy answer to loudspeaker placement. In general auditorium acoustics is a very complex field. It involves the interaction of the ...


1

It is unclear from the question whether the keyboard has a mono or stereo output so it's hard to say if you would need one or two of these. They do have 2 inputs but it will just mix them together. For true stereo you would need two and you would need them placed so that they form an equilateral triangle with the listener (you). It is also unclear whether ...


1

Remember that the output from your iPhone or Mac is likely stereo. Do you have TWO of these speakers? Or do you want to combine the Left + Right signals together into a monaural signal? You will need some way to combine the Left + Right signals together if you have only one speaker. There will be no significany "loss of quality" feeding the headphone ...


1

Theoretical models may or may not exist for these effects, and may or may not accurately reproduce the actual effect -- there are so many variables and so many loose manufacturing tolerances. You may want to consider developing a model from empirical data. Set up a reference PA system, interpose several grilles, and measure the effect as you vary material, ...


1

Haven't set one up myself, but I know a lot about 'em! It's a rather broad question, really. But to answer your specific request, the surround speakers are often set in an array in order to broaden the sweet spot for the audience. As such, the speakers closest to the front on each side are typically at a lower level than the speakers at the furthest rear. ...


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