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5

Very kindly ask where they were in the room. I listen to people in the audience when they take the time to come to FOH and file a formal complaint, sometimes something exists that you were not aware of, balcony fills amplifier went into thermal, turning off the fills on one side, in the booth on the dance floor, I cannot hear them so without the audience ...


5

It's perhaps worth going into a bit more detail about the setup. From what you've said I presume it was a PA system and people speaking, right? In makeshift situations like these I think the important things are: Use a cardoid/hypercardoid mic. If it's a lectern situation miniature shotguns like the akg c474 are good for this sort of thing Get your speaker ...


4

Sure, in my opinion compressors are an extremely useful tool and not using them at all as a rule is missing out on a lot. When I'm mixing, one of my goals is to make a cohesive, balanced sound that reflects what the band is playing. However, a microphone or instrument is an open conduit to potentially change that balance. So if a background singer for ...


3

There are a few things you can try, but if you are talking about the Bose Column system I am thinking of, I have used that and it does not do nearly what is advertised. Anyway, Stereo: This is the most common setup and your typical PA system. Even if you are running a "mono" source (a mic or instrument) a mixer will allow you to buss this to both ...


3

There are various concerns which need to be addressed with the solution you are proposing. Power output of the JBL Flip 4: From the specification here the JBL Flip 4 speakers are stereo speakers with a max power output of 2 x 8 Watts. The harmonic distortion of this speaker is unfortunately not listed in the specification, but one may assume that there ...


2

Since you're working with an audio file, not "live" sound...and you appear to be trying to do this with no budget...you can download Audacity (free open source program) and do time manipulation to the file within it. Work with the director to get the desired effect, then output the file. You'll have something predictable and repeatable for the performers ...


2

Mac Minis are great for Qlab audio, and are also cheaper than a macbook pro or a macbook air. We have several mac minis at my school theatre (Ithaca College) for just this purpose. If you're looking to do video though, make sure you use something with a discreet graphics card (ie. NOT a macbook air or 13" macbook pro).


2

It really depends on how large the lot is and how loud you want the volume. It's probably going to be a bit of a trick to get a signal into a consumer amp (I guess maybe a tape out could do it if you have a tape out on the mixer), but the speakers should work as long as you don't exceed their limits. They may or may not be powerful enough though since ...


2

First things first, use your crossover. You should connect your main outputs to it and feed your main loudspeakers and your subwoofers power amps from it. Connecting and learning how to configure your crossover should be easy enough and straightforward, after you do some reading of the manual. This will give you the advantage of using less faders to control ...


2

I use them all the time in the worship context. I won't usually compress the hell out of something though, I usually just use the compressor to take out the peaks in vocals, bass, acoustic guitars. I'll use them on kick and snare too, usually with a slow attack and fast release, this lets the initial transients through but then compresses them. Makes them ...


2

There are several variations and it is not possible to answer this as a simple, generic question. Most speakers have built-in crossovers for 2-way or 3-way (or even 4-way) systems. And, of course, self-powered speakers have the amplifier(s) and crossover built-in. The primary place you would need a separate crossover would be where you are using a sub-...


2

Pretty hard to say without accurately measuring the room & reinforcement - but unless your existing speaker 'pairs' are phase-aligned, your recent pro suggestion to remove the 'duplicates' sounds a fair guess to improve things quickly. Simple rule... more speakers == more complexity == more maths to get it to work. Guesswork becomes less likely to ...


2

This is nothing new, and it is likely to be caused by a sound designer triggering the sounds manually. The same is done in (live) broadcasts for other sporting events, the Norwegian State Broadcaster NRK has a rather good article about it here (translated via Google): https://translate.google.com/translate?sl=auto&tl=en&js=y&prev=_t&hl=en&...


2

Your only real solution, which is also cheap, is just to upgrade your mixer. It is not expensive to get a powered mixer with monitor outputs, and a couple of cheap wedge cabs. You really don't want to use a guitar amp as a monitor - it has the wrong characteristics. It is more likely to give feedback, it distorts etc...


1

Your location in relation to speakers (front and eventual delay towers) is extremely important. Try to place yourself at the point of the equilateral triangle that points out from the speaker, you should in general get the best sound experience: Usually that is also where you find the sound booth. People tend to move closer, in particular if the crowd ...


1

The best place is where it always has been - as near to the desk as you can get. That's where it's mixed from, that's where it sounds best. The only way to 'fix' it is to make compromises somewhere else. If the venue's small enough, you might even see the engineer wandering around the room, checking it out from different places.


1

I'd look for any encoder that can support MPEG-TS encoding for 30 channels. The problem you will run in to with doing 30 independent ffmpeg streams is that they will not properly interleave and you will likely get jumps when switching channels. You need an encoder that can take in to mind all 30 streams and use a fixed clock to sync the packets of audio ...


1

These are known as digital samplers and most Digital Audio Workstations come with their own, native sampler. For example, FL Studio's native sampler would be the Sampler Channel; Logic Pro's native sampler is EXS24. To trigger the digital sampler by the means of an external device, the hardware must be MIDI-compatible. In this particular setup, the keyboard ...


1

You don't mention how you record; are you splitting the masters from the QX1832USB, recording via the USB interface, or anything else? A different solution to what owl describes could simply be to mic the room. Although you don't get anything near "studio" quality of the resulting recordings, this can sound surprisingly well, and room mics will capture ...


1

For your situation I would at first consider teaching the singer better mic technique, if it is acceptable. From technical side if her sound is too thick after compression I would use EQ and gently cut those low mids. You could also try little compression on piano to get better dynamic separation from processed voice.


1

I generally call the tool I use for this "a sound guy". You can automate it though by doing some dynamics processing on the input to the effects unit. You need to use a device called an expander on the feed going to the effects unit (or have an effects unit that provides it's own expander). An expander is a lot like a compressor, but the ratio goes in the ...


1

You may well get some good advice here or on other forums, but you need someone who can look at your budget, examine the building plans, and provide you with a detailed analysis of your best course of action. So, if you really want to know the perfect place to put the booth, hire a professional. Not all architects are versed in sound, sound-control, and ...


1

This depends entirely on the layout of the room and the architect's design for it. More often than not, sound booths are placed in the open in the middle and near the back so that they don't block people's view and can hear an average experience. It can also help to elevate them so they are less impacted by people absorbing sound. (People absorb a LOT of ...


1

If it were me, I would prepare a separate audio file for the slow motion cue, and make sure that the regular speed cue before it is considerably longer than it needs to be. And then trigger the crossfade when the action onstage goes slow motion. In my experience, that kind of loose instruction from a director often just means, "I don't know exactly when yet....


1

http://jwsoundgroup.net/ +1 On what utopia said You can also do a search there, those "boys" are all about that.


1

Running the final dub mixer or the production sound mixer? If the latter, what's expected of you is perfect, top-notch recordings from the set or stage with little to no need to go in and fix it later. Reason being is that time is not on your side to get it right. You're not going to have as much time as Terrence Malick gives his sound crew to get the sound ...


1

http://www.ivsnd.com/2010/06/creating-a-machine-gun-sound-from-everyday-objects/ + http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vvadh6YM-RQ :)


1

The B1D looks like it is well designed--the air space between the foam and the mic end should help. (Shure's indoor pop filter for the SM-57 works the same way and is effective.) Sorry, haven't had the chance to try out the B1D, but it should certainly be better than not using a pop screen.


1

I haven't used the B1D in a close micing situation, but I have used the Shure outdoor windscreen designed for the SM81 (which fits the SM57 (see your Pres. Obama and every president going back to Bush and beyond). It's quite big, but very effective, even outdooors in calm conditions. It fits the Schoeps MK41/Mk4 very well. You might want to put an O-ring on ...


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