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6

Forum suitability: sure, this concerns music production much more than music playing, so it would seem more appropriate here. Generic kernel will make dropouts ("xruns") more likely even when using jackd with realtime priority. The jitter introduced in Midi is not that much of an issue since signals are time-stamped in the kernel and traditional 31250bps ...


5

Lower bit depths are not easily available simply because they are not looked for commercially, not because of some intrinsic technical difficulty. Audio interfaces or other capturing devices have their ADCs (Analog do Digital converters) based on integrated chips optimized for the features that are most requested commercially. In principle it would not be ...


4

Audacity has a Truncate Silence effect (Effect > Truncate Silence...) which should be able to do what you want: There are many other alternatives in other applications - but these are for Windows or OSX. I'll list them here for other users with same question but different host/OS needs: Pro Tools - Strip Silence Reaper - Dynamic Split Cubase - Cut head ...


2

It turns on that the main problem is that I had to turn on the mics to get anything to work. In this case, the buttons labelled L and R, which control the default 2 XY mics mounted at the top. If I had thought about it, I would have realised that was the case, but it seems to not have registered with me. Though even turned on, the mics generate almost no ...


2

Audio files are essentialy arrays (or vectors) of numeric values. If the audio files are uncompressed, the short audio file should exactly match a sequence of values within the long audio file. That means you could use tools like Matlab, Octave, Python (with modules) etc. to read in the audio as an array-like data type and then use provided functions to ...


2

To bridge from a raw MIDI port to a sequencer port, load the snd-virmidi module to create a virtual raw MIDI port, tell that program to use it, and connect the corresponding sequencer port to the soft synth (with aconnect). If possible, your program should be changed to use the ALSA sequencer API instead.


1

Ardour does it. that's almost free. SOX does it. that is just built in. http://sox.sourceforge.net/sox.html#EFFECTS You can get a list of your inputs a few ways sox -d -e ms-adpcm -b 16 -c 1 -r 8000 and then other stuff. If you are stuck not knowing what to use arecord -l will give you the list of input names With a realtime kernel JACK can do very low ...


1

The best way to proceed in your case is to increase the signal to noise ratio as much as possible. Try a different location for the microphone - somewhere where is further away from the keyboard noise. Try speaking closer to the mic and use lower amounts of gain. An software solution might not get you any satisfying results


1

There is hardware commercially available today that will accept multiple audio inputs and broadcast them over Wi-Fi to smart devices (phones, tablets...) with the use of apps. See Listen Technologies, Williams Sound, Sennheiser, along with a few other smaller companies.


1

If the audio inputs are correctly configured, you can use the method in this answer (or any answer to that question). The only difference would then be multiple instances of VLC. (Sorry for the short answer, but I can't currently test the method. Hopefully it'll be the direction you're looking for.)


1

Just give a chance to Ubuntu Studio. All music stuff including low latency kernel are ready to use in this distribution and you can still enjoy all advantages of debian-based distros. I use it for everything.


1

If by vocoder you mean "voice simulator" you can try the following cli on your Mac's terminal: $say "Hello World" For more informations about the command line type in $man say If you search for the other type of vocoder, try Jack with a normal vst plugin like Matrix on your Mac. If you are on Linux it's even better here is what I've found searching ...


1

While not free (as in beer or freedom) if you want a fully-fledged DAW there's also Bitwig Studio which is available on Linux, Windows, and OS X. There's even a free demo available on their website which only has the limitation of not being able to save your projects. (If you're not using Ubuntu, check your repos. For instance Arch has it in the AUR) Note ...


1

Audacity Audacity® is free, open source, cross-platform software for recording and editing sounds (comparable to software like Sound Forge and Wave Lab, only somewhat simpler). Audacity is available for Windows®, Mac®, GNU/Linux®; and other operating systems. Ardour Professional-grade multitrack/multichannel hard-disk recording/DAW: Record, edit, mix and ...


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