8

Using a higher order filter will give you a greater roll-off slope in the filters stop-band. So a 1st order filter has a roll-off slope of -6db/octave, 2nd order filter has a roll-off slope of -12db/octave, 3rd order filter has a roll-off slope of -18db/octave, 4th order filter has a roll-off slope of -24db/octave, etc. This means the filter does not act ...


3

Those combined EQ + spectroscopes can seem a bit misleading. The curve on your EQ isn't always what's actually happening, and similarly metering is only an averaging of the signal because audio is a much faster rate than your monitor. With a regular eq it's really more about using your ears to find something that works. You might be better off using an FFT ...


3

As with many things, it's a tradeoff. On the one hand, doing everything in post offers the most flexibility - you can compress and gate after the fact, and if you don't like the result you can change the settings around and try again without having to re-record. You can also cherry-pick individual regions to process differently if you like. On the other ...


2

A hardware compressor/limiter, when setup correctly, will prevent your signal from overloading your audio interface and distorting. This is very different from creative compression to change the loudness of the signal. If you are recording at 24bit, then you may be able to record such that you never peak close to 0 dB. But if you do cross 0, you will get ...


2

This is not possible by traditional, analogue means. As said by Bit Depth, such filters have a property called the order. What that means: the response of a filter of order n can be written as               ( an ⋅ ωn + an-1 ⋅ ωn-1 + ... + a2 ⋅ ω2 + a1 ⋅ ω + a0 ) A(ω) =  ———————————————————————               ( bn ⋅ ωn + bn-1 ⋅ ωn-1 + ... + b2 ⋅ ω2 + b1 ⋅ ω +...


2

There's Way too much to go into here, about leveling audio, and as I haven't heard the audio clip, I will keep it short. The speech leveller is probably causing the problem and you may not be using the hard limiter properly. I would suggest scrapping the speech leveller and instead using the single band compresser with 'instant' attack(0ms) ,a short ...


1

There is no magic trick to make something good out of a bad recording. It will always sound very bad. That is why is it extremely important to get a good recording at first, with plenty of dynamic and the full spectrum of the sources: you will save yourself the pain of desperately trying to get something good out of a bad recording (Something you can't). If ...


1

It has nothing to do with the Nyquist frequency, because you correctly state that there is no significant energy above 20 kHz, and we wouldn't be able to hear that anyway. If you over-sample a waveform, you can get a better representation of the waveform, so it indeed yields a better response to peaks in the compression algorithm. That's why something like ...


1

basically if the sound you have recorded is across the sound spectrum as a whole then that would translate to the sample rate.so fuller sound more possibilities of compression without disturbing the character of that sound.


1

Typical mastering chain will have 3 main elements: EQ Compression Limiting That's the order I would apply them personally. On EQ, you're just trying to make sure the overall feel of the song suits the genre/mood. Pretty subjective, but a "safe" approach could be a small scoop in the midrange and a high shelf boost for "shimmer" (whatever that means, ...


1

Nothing definite since I can't play around with it first hand, but what might have happened here is that you put the EQ as an effect on top of the audio file, but didn't render it to permanently change the audio file itself. So, when you go to view the waveform, it's still showing you the original, un-eq'd waveform. I'm not that familiar with ableton, but I ...


1

You really can't mix anything on headphones or TV accurately, its impossible!Totally impossible! Proof, take a graphic analyzer and check the wave dynamic of each TV & headphone & computer monitor's sound response output, and you will see a hundred different patterns on your hundred different TV's headphones etc., The EQ levels are all over the place!...


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