3

The internal sound card of the computer is most likely the problem. These onboard audio components are very cheaply made, meaning they are not designed to avoid interference from other components and power lines inside the computer and they also don't have the filtering to remove interference once it enters the audio path. Get an external audio interface: ...


2

There are various ways to deal with this kind of things: The one I would go with: send it back to the speaker and say that it is unusable and he has to make a better recording. Do help in setting up equipment and room and such better. Use specialized tools: plugins for handling scratches in copied vinyl recordings might be something to look for. Izotope RX ...


2

This is of necessity vague. Without actually hearing it, it's hard to say with any precision. Compression may remove the worst of it, multi-band compression may allow you to fine-tune to those frequencies. Some training & technique might go towards avoiding the issue in future, correct distance, pop-shielding - though I've never known any decent mic make ...


1

One option is to apply a brickwall limiter with a threshold around -6 dBFS to the track. That should lower the higher audio peaks. You would then have room to apply a higher gain to the whole track. Be aware that a limiter might produce undesirable artifacts, you should therefore test the limiter settings on a few peaks to fine tune the threshold before ...


1

if you dont know how to use a compressor , automate the volume. Some software allows you to draw a volume curve to adjust loud and low parts.


1

This is what a compressor is for. You can reduce the dynamic range of a whole track (making the loud parts quieter) and then adjust the overall volume of the track as you wish. It would be easy to do that in a DAW (like Logic), but I'm not sure if Audacity can do that. After a quick google, I found this in the Audacity wiki: https://manual.audacityteam.org/...


1

EMV is very much correct but there are a number of things you can do to reduce the hum. Make sure all of the audio equipment is on the same circuit to help reduce chance that you are in a ground loop. Add a ferite clip to the analog audio cable. Change the surge protector that you are using. Different pieces of equipment can be more sensitive to cheap ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible