6

I am in hong kong now and it's a city which never sleeps! I reckon HK is less strict than china and is overall more English language-friendly. I have done recordings with a team in the industrial area and we never really got questioned aside from curious onlookers. When in HK, Be sure to look out for small protests downtown almost every Sunday (usually ...


4

You can't do that. It would be akin to ripping the T-rex roar out of Jurassic Park and calling it your own. The sound from the movie you're referencing is part of the soundtrack of the film, which is the legal property of whichever studios and production companies financed it. If you can't create the sound you desire on your own, then you need to hire a ...


2

Years ago I was in China and had a little recorder, it was my first recording trip overseas actually. I had no issues whatsoever apart from people staring and coming to talk in the middle of the recording - the usual... Don't know about a blimp though. As Colin says, be careful of certain places. Maybe if there are lots of officials around, skip it, or go ...


2

I would say that there are some places that are considered more sensitive than others (i.e. government buildings, public transport systems) so this may be more problematic if you intend to record in these places. Though I don't think a recording permit exists, it may be worth inquiring at the Chinese embassy when you sort out your visa. If you are working ...


2

I think in any country the foreigner with a reserved (stealth) behavior always provoke more suspicions than a usual (impudent) tourist with a camera. Or in your case with a blimp. If there will be some prohibited places a local police officer will always warn you about that. Or you just can ask him about it yourself.


2

These recordings belong to their authors or assignees, therefore in order to legally use them in your movie you may have to obtain the owners' license. If all the recordings are of the sort you mentioned in the question then you are most likely exempt from such license, as these recordings are very short and with no artistic or commercial value. You might ...


2

My personal take on it is that we set out with a turnaround time at the beginning, and we put it in writing as one of the line items within the contract - in some regards its a 'handshake deal' with some clients beyond that in terms of if we have to meet that drop-dead agreed date or if we have some wiggle room but we want to finish around that listed ...


2

This is absolutely NOT OK. The soundtrack is part of a copyright protected film. You are, however, making an excellent case to hire a Sound Designer. This is what we do (and its what you need). We rarely just put a stock sound effect in for something like this. We manipulate and process multiple sounds to achieve something that will create (hyper)realism ...


1

Although I am not a lawyer, I believe that the CALM act does apply to commercials, either the ones you produce in-house or the one provided by a third party (as I suppose you are in the US). For the technical aspects of achieving such compliance, the ATSC A/85:2013 seems a good starting point.


1

When I negotiate freelance projects, I typically give clients a rough mix to review and request changes, plus 1 or 2 rounds of revisions after that to get to final mix. This simply means that this is all that will be completed under the negotiated rate (be that flat project fee or hourly/daily/etc.). Any work or revisions requested beyond that will be done ...


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