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6

I am in hong kong now and it's a city which never sleeps! I reckon HK is less strict than china and is overall more English language-friendly. I have done recordings with a team in the industrial area and we never really got questioned aside from curious onlookers. When in HK, Be sure to look out for small protests downtown almost every Sunday (usually ...


6

Hey Young George, emails aren't contracts. And getting someone to sign a contract is usual business practice, so go ahead and do it without feeling uneasy about it. You can tell him it's how you always work, if you fear it will create distrust, but it never happened to me in the past. And if he doesn't want to sign it that's a huge red flag.


5

You are required to gain clearance, otherwise the owner of that sample could demand payment from you. From this useful article on emusician.com: Sampling potentially violates the law regarding two separate copyrights, the copyright of the musical composition (the PA Copyright) and the copyright of the sound recording (SR Copyright). You need to ...


3

The most relevant piece of software I could find is called Praat. It's free, and it offers spectral, pitch, and formant analysis—but it was developed for the study of phonetics. This is deep software though, and, though I feel comfortable in max, reaktor, and other visual programming environments, Praat is beyond me. It's the most relevant software i've ...


3

Crediting never gives permission to use anything. If the creator does not say anything in the description, or does not provide a creative commons (CC) or similar license, you need to reach the creator, tell about your usage and obtain a written permission. If you can't get this permission, you cannot use that work. If you use the videos for a portfolio, ...


3

Another option would be to ask those artists where they found those royalty-free samples. Though there are sample collections that are sold on CD or DVD, there are also repositories of sound bites and samples that are in the public domain. One excellent source is the Prelinger Archives. Another is freesound.org.


3

Well, if you mean cutting up trailers and doing a sound re-design on them, you'll want to tag them as a sound re-design so as to not be confused with the real deal. If it's trailer's that you've actually done, I believe it should be fine since it is your own work and being shown for demonstration purposes. In my reel I make sure to tag the production ...


2

I second Tim for doing post work as well, although in my experience usually I'm the one extending the contract/deal to the client than their production company doing it to me, unless it's a larger studio entity and/or there's any NDA associated with the show. Occasionally I do handshake deals, but it's highly selective only only with a select few ...


2

Years ago I was in China and had a little recorder, it was my first recording trip overseas actually. I had no issues whatsoever apart from people staring and coming to talk in the middle of the recording - the usual... Don't know about a blimp though. As Colin says, be careful of certain places. Maybe if there are lots of officials around, skip it, or go ...


2

I would say that there are some places that are considered more sensitive than others (i.e. government buildings, public transport systems) so this may be more problematic if you intend to record in these places. Though I don't think a recording permit exists, it may be worth inquiring at the Chinese embassy when you sort out your visa. If you are working ...


2

I think in any country the foreigner with a reserved (stealth) behavior always provoke more suspicions than a usual (impudent) tourist with a camera. Or in your case with a blimp. If there will be some prohibited places a local police officer will always warn you about that. Or you just can ask him about it yourself.


2

I give contracts to my closest friends when I hire them for work. It is the only way to guarantee that everyone is on the same page and everything is spelled out in case there is a disagreement/misunderstanding down the road.


2

The Software License Agreement for Mac OS X 10.7.3 suggests that it is legally NOT OK to us the System Voices for anything else than your personal, non-commercial use: "G. Voices. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, you may use the system voices included in the Apple Software (“System Voices”) (i) while running the Apple Software and (ii) ...


2

What is being Protected? The copyrights of published music primarily involve these two properties: Sound Recordings - Any recording of any sort. Where the prime concern is for published recordings (that is the "masters" rather than the "multitrack"). Songwriting - A general term to describe authorship rights (the work of the author, ie lyrics) and ...


2

The license given to a radio station (whether analogue, digital, or online) grants the station the right to play music to the public. The license is granted by the relevant collection society (eg, PRS in the UK) and the fee is proportional to the max amount of possible listeners at any given time (for big station this is often quoted as 'reach', for online ...


2

You need to check the license for the clip. If they are not Creative Commons licensed then it's probably a good idea to get in touch with the creator for permission. If you've not started on anything though it is going to be easier to just pick CC licensed work from the start (of which there is plenty). You can also search by license on Vimeo in the ...


2

3 options: 1. Izotope RX4 in demo mode, is capable of detecting 'similar sounds'. I haven't used in on voices, but it could work. But you need to consider that it needs clean samples (in the same recording) and that demo will only run for 1 month.. 2. Dragon Dictate is a dictation app that allows discrete dictation in ios and mac osx (maybe also other os'es)....


1

Although I am not a lawyer, I believe that the CALM act does apply to commercials, either the ones you produce in-house or the one provided by a third party (as I suppose you are in the US). For the technical aspects of achieving such compliance, the ATSC A/85:2013 seems a good starting point.


1

However you do it, you'll probably need a clean sample of the sounds(voices/words) that you want to target, as a spectral reference. The sample could be taken from the recording itself, as long as it was a clean sample(no other sounds involved). This way the sonic characteristics of the recording device would be included. For that reason, the sample would ...


1

If the sheet music you are talking about is classical music, they are in public domain because the copyrights expire some time after composer's death (50-70 years depending on the laws of the country). If they are contemporary works you can't record and distribute them without getting permission. You can rely here for not taking action but if you want to ...


1

Am I entitled to credit or compensation? If you have copyright for these particular sounds, then using the sounds without your permission is technically a copyright infringement. However, whether you want to go court is another topic, more likely the infringement that bothers you can be solved simply by negotiating. If you've signed a contract where you've ...


1

I find on a number of freelance projects, the client wants some standard contract signed to some effect with a "work-for-hire" type clause in it - essentially stating any design work you do and audio materials you provide will be owned by them. Obviously this is something I avoid in general, unless the price is right, but the big question ...


1

Don't take risks, if there's anything that makes you feel like you have to get a written agreement for it. If the opposite side doesn't understand your intention, then they aren't acting professionally, nor maturely. If there's no written agreement, then there's nothing you can fall back on, if something changes or goes differently from what was agreed. I ...


1

Yes, there are hundreds of choices, so I think you just need to look around what you can get and what you can then use it for. Be careful with sampled instruments, samples and wavetable synths. It's almost always a license or a copyright infringement to resell a sample. So you need to know what you can do and what you cannot or edit or layer the sound ...


1

Ideally you want to showcase original work (i.e. product originally had your sound, not someone else's). It's then far easier to assume you have the right to showcase the work if you haven't explicitly requested so. Realise this is a catch 22 but it also means keeping a pretty tight focus on what's included in your reel. Over time, with some luck, i'm ...


1

As an affordable option you could try Bitspeek. It's only $29 (about €20) and it's a pretty flexible plugin.


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