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There are some USB audio adapters which provide 5 or 7 channel output on 3.5mm TRS sockets. Those tend to have microphone inputs with bias voltage on them, too. Only problem is that the quality is not better than that of the average microphone input on a laptop. As a rule: anybody who has the temerity to provide a 3.5mm phone socket for a microphone will ...


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The manual for this device states it provides stereo line out (>250mV) on a pair of RCA (phono) connectors. If the microphone signal is routed to the line out you can record that with no need for a receiver. (I'd expect the microphone signal should be available on the line out but the "manual" is very short on details.) The microphones are VHF ...


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You are approaching this from the wrong direction. You are not going to be able to successfully reverse engineer this RF link. Could be any frequency, even 2.4GHz. Could be any modulation. You are not going to be able to find out without a significant amount of effort. Solution is to replace the RF link with your own. Give the talent a different radio mic, ...


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If you're getting an external USB audio interface, get one that supports phantom power [48v]. The Shure [& many other pro-level lav mics] comes with interchangeable adaptors for connectivity to different manufacturers' body packs etc as well as 'regular' XLR. If you don't need to consider wireless integration, then XLR is the 'safe option'. I can't find ...


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