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You don't need 3 different sets of recording equipment. All you need is a mixer and a recorder. The mixer allows you to take inputs of varying impedances and levels, balance them, and pass to the recorder. Don't use audio splitters, as they will not impedance match and will cause degradation of signal. 4 track mixers are really cheap these days.


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The Rode SmartLav+ is a high impedance [high-Z] mic, suited to computer headset/mic inputs. It also sounds like the pin-out of TRRS is designed to not confuse a computer's headset input. It's not really built for pro audio. Your Tascam, based on the plug input types [I can't see any real spec on their web page], is expecting a professional low impedance [low-...


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It depends on the power expectations and circuit design of the microphone. Some phone lavalier mics use a LR44 battery. Maybe yours does, too. The LR44 battery, for example, has a nominal voltage of 1.5V and 105 mAh. USB has 5V and 3A (USB-C). That's a lot more power than a device using a LR44 battery would expect. If you wired it up directly, you'd probably ...


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Here's my thinking, which considers "I'm on a tight budget" the #1 concern. True, lavaliers are standard for this type of work. But if you are on such a tight budget that you don't have a mixer, my suggestion is not to use lavaliers. Especially wired lavaliers if the cable run is going to be more than 25', unless you're using very expensive cable. ...


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There are a number of options here. The most practical will be a wireless lavalier kit. Typical devices are the Rode Wireless Go or the Sennheiser G3. Some manufacturers also offer a 'butt-plug' style device which allows you to attach a transmitter directly to a handheld microphone directly via the XLR connection. However, handheld use of the mic is required....


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