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It is rare to find a new electronic keyboard that doesn't also have MIDI. So if you want some basic sounds and the ability to play away from your computer, then go ahead and get a keyboard with sounds built into it. Dedicated MIDI controller keyboards may offer more control via knobs, faders and sometimes pads. If you need any of that stuff, then you may ...


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Try contacting Roland or your official Roland Service Center first. Korg and Yamaha both have reputations for helping out with their products even when they are long out of warranty. Roland doesn't have that reputation as much, but you should still start by asking them. If you can't get Roland to supply you with a chip, then look for forums where people who ...


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I agree with Jay (hi Jay!!), this should be fairly straightforward to do and like Mark says you might need a DAW which will help you load the Vocoder software and route your ins and outs. Remember that for the vocoder to work you need two signals, a modulator (your voice) and a carrier (synth sound). You need to set the vocoder to receive your computer's ...


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Correct - a separate amplifier is not needed to record keyboard. Just about any decent quality 2 channel interface will do. For example look at the Lexicon Alpha Studio (about $60) - on the front you have an instrument input suitable for guitar and bass, on the rear you have stereo (L and R) line in, ideal for keyboard. Moreover there is a mic input too (...


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The cable includes an in-line MIDI adapter. (MIDI and USB are not compatible signals.) M-Audio is a respected manufacturer while the other one is a no brand adapter. It might not work as well or might not support as many channels, but at $5, it's hard to go wrong giving it a try and the reviews seem to indicate it will work for your purposes. If I had to ...


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I solved this by making keyboard it self is the only output device, Synthesia will use the synthesizer in the keyboard which is a hardware thus is faster. and u will hear the sounds on the Keyboard speakers. No delay at all.


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Audio First, be aware that each input jack on the interfaces you are considering (and the vast majority of audio interfaces) is mono, not stereo. So you will need 4 input jacks just to plug in your two keyboards. Admittedly, it's not entirely helpful that in their marketing language companies will say "stereo line input" when what they really have is two ...


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As AJ Henderson and Warrior Bob mentioned, those cables are also MIDI interfaces. I have several of the cable-style MIDI interfaces, as well as an old eMagic AMT8 and a MOTU 828 MK2. A few of my synths with USB interfaces function as USB-MIDI interfaces, but I rarely use them for that purpose. I also have the Elektron TM-1 interface for my MachineDrum. For ...


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Your "MIDI-USB cable" is a MIDI interface: a computer-addressable device that accepts and sends MIDI messages through MIDI DIN jacks. In this case both of the indicated devices are specifically USB MIDI interfaces. Featurewise, there's likely no difference between them. The price differential is probably due to name and build quality. Sometimes the fancier ...


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There are two simple approaches that I can think of: Get a mic that doesn't pick up as much noise Get a keyboard that doesn't make as much noise The first one I don't know too much about, but something to look into is the pickup pattern. If you use a mic with a cardioid pickup pattern and can position it so the keyboard is to the rear of the mic, the mic ...


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You will need to search for tutorials on "Audio Sampling", "Audio Pitch Manipulation", "Audio Editing" and "Video Editing". You will need to learn how to use a Digital Audio Workstation such as "Reaper" or "Pro-Tools". If you are starting from scratch, it's a long road ahead of you, but rewarding as you make the journey.


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A MIDI file only contains information on which notes you're playing. The sound attached to each note is not part of the file (which is why a MIDI file is much smaller than an audio file). What you're looking for is a sound module or software synthesizer that can replicate the sound of your Yamaha keyboard. One common format for this is a VST plugin - a ...


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The Impact outputs MIDI...LMMS uses MIDI. MIDI is a pretty good standard, and any controller presented to the interface can be assigned in LMMS. The documentation on https://lmms.io/wiki/index.php?title=Using_MIDI is very useful and explanatory.


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It is unclear from the question whether the keyboard has a mono or stereo output so it's hard to say if you would need one or two of these. They do have 2 inputs but it will just mix them together. For true stereo you would need two and you would need them placed so that they form an equilateral triangle with the listener (you). It is also unclear whether ...


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The "USB TO DEVICE" connector is not useful for real-time MIDI. Both keyboards have a "USB TO HOST" connector, which can be connected only to a PC. So if you want to link them, you have to do this with software on the PC. (This typically requires a "virtual MIDI" driver.)


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Just get a Noise Gate Software (Info : Noise Gate) and set the threshold to where the keyboard is not picked up, also try to take away the microphone from the table the keyboard is on to cause less handling noise (if you haven't done that already). Last, try to be consistent to how you type and talk, if you start typing very loudly the noise gate will open ...


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An interface will not change anything. What are you using this mic for? Recording music, podcasts, or gaming? Do you need the most perfect vocal quality? The reason you hear your keyboard is because your mic is a condenser mic. This type of mic is highly sensitive and used exclusively for recording. Mine will pick up birds chirping outside my apartment. ...


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IMO, if the keyboard player fulfills a bassist role, then it is a good idea to use a bass amp! This way, at least on smaller stages you're sure that the bass will be properly present everywhere on stage. With wedge monitors alone, you rely on the mixer to properly distribute to everybody individually. That's not really a standard scenario; you may well end ...


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I would probably go for a combined setup: Get a reamping box (reverse DI) to ensure correct levels and impedance. You can hook up the interface with the box using XLR and continue on to the bass amplifier using standard jack cable. You can test both the Hi and Low input, but using the reamp box, the Low (impedance) input is probably the one to go for. This ...


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Explanation You'll want to run a 1/4" (jack) cable out of your keyboards audio (main) out and plug it into your audio interface. Then in FL Studio you'll have to open the mixer and select an empty channel. On the top right of the mixer above the effect slots you can select an audio input. Select your audio interface from the dropdown and you should get the ...


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To "mute" a track when there's audio coming out of some other track, you can use sidechain compression. Here's how to do it: Insert a Compressor on the "LIVE KEYS BACKUP" track Select the "LIVE KEYS" track as the sidechain input Set Ratio to the maximum Set Threshold to the minimum If you now have a clip playing on the "LIVE KEYS BACKUP" track and you ...


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If you can dig up the service manual, there is a minute chance that they cover some of the technical aspects there. If you have an iOS device with the app, you can document the consumer related functionality yourself: Capture the network traffic between the two devices as you go through the different app features. You may use a sniffing tool such as ...


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No. The FC3 is only compatible with keyboards with half dampering capability. We recommend the FC4 piano style pedal instead. NOTE: The FC3 is only compatible with: S90ES/XS, MOTIFXS/XF, P120,140,155,P250, P60, P70, P85/P95,NP30, All CP series digital pianos. - Yamaha FAQ From what I understand, the FC3 features "continuous sustain". This ...


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I'll stick my neck out & say it's a Fender Rhodes - though half the time I'm wrong & it's a Wurlitzer ;-) Both were 'real' instruments, electric pianos which generated sound by using a piano keyboard & mechanical levers & hammers similar to a real piano, but instead of strings, had metal bars or tines which were struck by the hammers. The ...


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If it has USB out then you can use it with any software of your choice. Just go to preferences of the program and you can set it up there. The audio out is for connecting to speakers for live performances. Try the program GarageBand, it is very cheap and suitable for a person who wants to record their piano playing. The only problem that you may encounter is ...


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I also have a Blue Snowball Mic and a keyboard with Cherry MX Blue switches. Getting rid of typing noise seems straight forward if you are either typing OR talking. But filtering out the typing while speaking would take quite a bit of effort and could also result in taking away sound that you want to hear that is part of your voice. For me the best solution ...


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Aren't Cherry MX Blues practically designed to be loud? I heard once that DasKeyboard used to offer ear plugs as an accessory (as a joke)... I love my mechanical keyboards, but I use MX Browns any time there's going to be a mic in use (like for videoconferencing. Obviously I don't use a keyboard at all when I'm recording something important.) That said, the ...


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You gonna need an audio interface (unless you got decent sound card allready, but most of them are multimedia purposed, and not the best solution for recording of any kind). Your keyboard does not support USB recording, so You'll need to use lineout jack. After getting the audio interface, you will need to just plug the instrument in and that's that ...


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