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2

Well, rode has created the solution to this problem. The iXY iPhone/iPad microphone, with its own a/d converter can record at 96kHz/24bit, bypassing iOS's 48kHz/16bit limit. Great move from Rode. http://store.rodemic.com/products/ixy Not for iPhone 5 yet, however.


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I picked up a Smartphone Headset To PC Adapter and it works with an iRig. Here's one on amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Smartphone-Headset-PC-Adapter-01-PH35-PC35/dp/B008OB2NHA


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I'm fairly certain I know what the problem was now. Figure will always export the current file, in whatever state it was last saved in. This means if you mute 2 of the 3 tracks and export, you will not get the resulting single track you expected. You have to mute the undesired tracks, then save, then export. I had known this and thought I was saving, but ...


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NO. The TRRS connector on an iPhone (or any other brand of phone, for that matter) supports only MONO microphones. If you want to record stereo (or more channels) then you must use an external sound interface. There are some rather small ones that are suitable for use with a phone. For example the "IK Multimedia iRig Pro DUO 2-Channel Audio and MIDI ...


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I tried this with a mixpre-d and an Android tablet (so same idea) and it worked fine,but, and this is the rub, it had slightly more self-noise than running a line level out into a recorder. A surprise to me, but testing was pretty rigorous. Given that using a rugged mixpre-d to an iPad/iPod/nexus is not very field use friendly either, so it would better on ...


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As an experiment, use skype or hangout because everybody has it installed already, and you can hook it into the PA with some real soundcard. If you want to go further, use some sound server as Jack on iOs with seperate recording app and streaming app. That would be the only way around the noise reduction and echo cancellation algorithms mandatory in ...


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Don't, just don't. Using smartphones as microphones for live sound is really highly ill-advised. You will have all kinds of network latency issues, feedback issues (as they are generally designed to be omni-directional), quality issues, etc. You can do it in a pinch for a recording maybe, but if you are using it for reinforcement, you are majorly asking ...


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In the line of iPods until model "iPod Touch 2G" Apple used analog line-in (specific pins in 30-pin apple dock connector). There was even some prosumer products like Alesis ProTrack that allowed to connect various sources to that input. It's legacy now since the Apple choose to replace the analog input with digital connections. For modern iPhones/iPods, ...


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Have in mind that when shooting run and gun documentary style, a boom will be far more handy. You'll be able to use a highly directional microphone with it (a shotgun), so you can isolate surrounding noise. The mics you mention (iXY and zoom's built in mics) are not that directional, so you'll pick up a lot of background noise. A rule of thumb is that you ...


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I created an iPhone and iPad impulse response to simulate their speakers in a DAW. It will work in any convolution reverb that imports wav files. Enjoy :) http://www.aaronbrownsound.com/free-impulse-responses-from-the-ipad-iphone-and-behritone-speakers/


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