5

Take a look at this (I made a quick snapshot of it as the fist kick came in. To the left is guitar and bass unadulterated, in the middle is the kick and to the right is no kick but reduced guitar and bass until the next kick comes along: - I don't think it's side-chaining, I think it's regular compression with a long sustain i.e. the kick comes in and gets ...


2

That's your phone's brain, son! Your computers will do that as well if their audio circuitry isn't isolated from the rest of the box. I battled this issue a lot when I was doing sound design for theaters and playing the show back on a cheap laptop. You haven to have the gain cranked pretty high to pick it up or just have a beast of an amp, but I also ...


1

Actually, this is when you want to apply side-chain compression. You want to compress the tracks you don't want to be the most present using the output from the channel(s) you want to preserve.


1

This is one of my favorite kinds of glitchy accidental sounds. I've had computers where the onboard sound is located right next to a USB port. The devices plugged into the USB port make a variety of sounds, from really subtle to chaotic. With one of them, if I plugged my optical mouse into it, I was able control the pitch of it by lifting the mouse up and ...


1

Out of personal experience (I work 9 years as a system technician) I would say "you won't have a problem". If you look at it from a "more scientific" point of view the way buzzes (and in general interference) bleeds into cables is, most of the time, through (electro)magnetic induction (for more information if you are unfamiliar with the phenomenon look for "...


1

If you aren't letting the legs touch the cables and everything is properly terminated then I see no possibility of grounding problems.


1

If you are looking for a wireless in-ear monitoring option you need to look at something more along the lines of this. Using a Bluetooth transmitter can introduce delay in the system since the signal needs to be digitized, transmitted then converted back to an analog wave form. But to answer your direct question no they should not interfere but its hard to ...


1

I think this has something to do with HARMONY, i haven't completed harmony yet so I'm not 100% sure... When you have two frequencies of different values playing simultaneously, the brain and ear automatically begin to compare the two intervals. Unless it's by like a decimal it will be noticeably different than the first.


1

I would first start by isolating devices to the minimum subset where you can reproduce the problem. For example, if the mixer isn't plugged in to the camera, is it still a problem? If levels are peaking, is gain set properly, does adjusting gain impact the problem more or less than expected? Does XLR vs 1/4" make a difference on the noise. Are the ...


1

Seems like you should start looking at other variables, namely trying another frequency, trying different transmitters (not receivers), changing batteries in one unit at a time, changing locations (I trust that you've checked for presence of microwave towers and other environmental concerns), etc. The variables are many and this will take a good while to ...


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