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4

Your mention of a computer apparently confused some people. The actual question is just: how do I connect a line-level source to a mic-level input? You use an attenuator or 'pad' to reduce the level. At its simplest, this can be a 2-3 resistor network, even a single resistor in line with the signal. Or you can buy a line-to-mic attenuator at an electronics ...


4

An electronic circuit is what the name implies - a circuit. For it to work there has to be a continuous unbroken loop from the power source (in this case the amplifier) through the load (the coils in the speaker) and back to the amplifier. Hence the two wires. Without an unbroken loop no current can flow, and nothing can happen. Another way to look at it ...


3

You just use two balanced audio cables with XLR on the speaker side and 1/4-inch on the audio interface side. That is a very standard pro audio cable.


3

If you're on a Mac or UNIX box, you might be able to do something useful with a UNIX-domain socket and dtach - basically you'd have your recording "server" save to the socket in .wav format, and then have dtach connect to the socket and multiplex the output into multiple encoders (cat, lame, flac, etc.). It would look something like this: dtach -A fifo-...


3

Line in is an audio input normally around 150mv line sensitivity and can be used for devices such as tape players,cd players,mp3 players etc. It cannot be used as a microphone input as you would hardly hear it, a microphone input needs to see an input sensitivity of around -5 mv input,as cd players and mp3 players already have an output of around 100+mVolts ...


3

I'm not sure who sold you that XLR to 1/4" cable, but it flat out isn't right. XLR is a balanced signal, which means it has 3 different conductors. The 1/4" connector it is adapting to only is a Tip/Sleeve connector which only provides 2. Additionally, the levels between a microphone and a guitar are completely different and not really compatible. With ...


3

To which input should I insert both an active di-box with a passive guitar and a passive dibox with an active guitar? MIC input without phantom power (unless the active DI box is powered by phantom power). To which inputs should I insert all the rest of the guitars without di-box and different types of the pickups? INST input. How can my 3-4 ...


2

Well I don't record much foley other than an add track or prop here and there, but I've certainly cut a bunch of it. The decision to use compression IMHO should depend mostly on the tastes of the Sound/Foley Supervisor and for what medium (I.E. Film vs TV). I'd check with who is receiving/cutting/mixing the foley first. Some supervisors/mixers will ...


2

Everyone has a different approach, and you'll probably hear a few of them from other folks on this site. The one common thing you'll hear, is that there is no rule that applies in every situation. What gear are you using? What's your sound source? Where is the mic positioned? How will the sound be used once you get it back into the studio? What type of sound ...


2

I picked up a Smartphone Headset To PC Adapter and it works with an iRig. Here's one on amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Smartphone-Headset-PC-Adapter-01-PH35-PC35/dp/B008OB2NHA


2

Solution: Send a MIDI SysEx "reset all" message. What worked for me: Download MIDI-OX for Windows or KMidimon for Linux. I use Windows so these steps will continue with MIDI-OX. Start MIDI-OX. Go to Options->MIDI Devices. Select your MIDI input ("E-MU Xmidi1X1 Tab" for me). I actually selected Microsoft GS Wavetable Synth for my MIDI output, but I don't ...


2

As Jim mentioned, the device you are looking for is called a pad. It will drop the level as necessary, you can either get an adjustable one or simply get a 60db pad and you should be ok, but you should also consider whether your current approach is the best. If you are playing back some electronic file in to the mic input, it would be a better bet to ...


2

The TV needs an actual video source to be detected. Simply terminating the input doesn't count. You need a video signal that has all the synchronization signals (which are detected) but the picture area is simply black. In video production this is called a "black generator". This is typically an expensive piece of broadcast gear. But, because analog ...


2

No, it won't work. Those inputs are design for keyboards or similar, therefore they don't have preamps. Overheads are usually condenser mics too, so if yours are, these inputs won't supply phantom power for them to work either. In order to make them work with those inputs, you'll need external pre amplifiers, but for the money, you'll be better upgrading ...


2

Generally no, using multiple inputs shouldn't lower quality as long as the USB controllers still have sufficient bandwidth for the devices to function. If you use a hub to connect everything, then you may run in to data rate issues causing latency or outright failure, but in general, the data is digital and should get from point a to point b alright. There ...


2

If you want to keep things technically 'correct' you'd need a dedicated DI box for exactly this, such as the Art's Dual RDB or the Avedis line PAD-Z. A pad will work (although you will be looking at a healthy attention - possibly more than what some pad switches offer). But the impedance matching won't be technically ideal. However, this may actually colour ...


2

According to this SOS article, it is for a latching footswitch to bypass the FX section. A stereo TRS jack carries the output from the internal effects section and there's an effects bypass footswitch jack for use with an optional latching footswitch.


2

Here's a great summary of the different signal levels: Mic level is the lowest, or weakest, level signal of the four and requires a preamplifier to bring it up to Line level. Instrument level signals live between mic and line level signals and have the most variation. You typically see this kind of signal come from an electric guitar or bass. A ...


2

That the channel is "stereo" is really not important as long as you use the L/mono input. But there are other things to consider: The load impedance (mixer input impedance) should be higher than the source/output impedance (mic/strument). The usual rule-of-thumb is a 1:10 impedance ratio between instrument/mic and preamp. A typical passive bass impedance ...


2

Plug your Microphone, using a XLR(Male)-XLR(Female) cable into the Microphone input. It is the input with the little Microphone picture as shown here: Using any other input will not work.


1

You just need a mixer (before the headphone amp) to control what and how much goes into your in-ears. In live situations this is a very simple task for a monitor engineer but if there isn't one, the FOH engineer could send you a mix of what you need (clicks, guitar and vocals) if he has a spare auxiliary out and a spare line on his multi.


1

1. "Can I feed DI box output into the line inputs in my mixer?" Your typical Behringer mixer has a gain range of -10 to +40 dB with the line in, but this varies from mixer to mixer (look it up in the specs section of the manual). The signal level from the DI box greatly depends on what you connect to it and the DI box model. But generally you get ranges ...


1

You can't change the signal level that that's recorded from Logic, Logic will record the signal it gets bit for bit. You can change the monitoring level in Logic and that's what you're hearing when you adjust the levels in Logic while tracking. The way to control your signal level that's recorded is right from your Apollo, the big knob adjusts your relevant ...


1

Your MacBook only has Line In and Line Out ports. The Line In port does not contain a microphone preamplifier (You may be able to boost the microphone signal enough to make it useable, but it will most likely still be low in volume and sound weak). However the Line Out (yes - the line out port!) actually contains a real microphone input also (for use with ...


1

Don't try and do it with hardware if they are internal sources. That will just introduce an analog loss cycle. Your game audio and voice chat audio are already digital and sending them out and back in is not only unnecessary but counter productive. Yes, you could use 3 different audio outputs. Some games and most voice chat software lets you select the ...


1

Hey one thing that I use for such tasks are automator patches! In apples Automator you can Programm (dont worry its simple) simple movements and tasks like pick a file and move it to this place ... Then you can use the compressor (software You find in the Apple store, best Software to encode) to create a droplett (Icon on the desktop, when you put a file on ...


1

I have experienced the same issue, including just yesterday preparing for a live performance, and thought the unit was broken. Apparently based on your post, it is a bug in the 1x1 itself. To resolve the problem, unplugging the 1x1 and re-inserting it usually rectifies the issue. Very annoying... This effectively resets the unit.


1

Had the same problem with E-Mu MIDI 1x1, windows 7 64 bit. Disconnectng and reconnecting the MIDI USB solved the mystery delay. Thanks.


1

This exact thing is happening to me. I tried updating the drivers, but that didn't help. The only consistent feature that seems to take the lag away is to unplug the USB device, wait at least 10 seconds, then plug it back in. Once plugged in again, it works like a charm. Having the device plugged in during boot-up slows it down for some reason. I'm ...


1

For me a mic input is usually a balanced input and has "extra" electronics inside that give a few dB more gain with a lower noise circuit. If you put your mic into a normal line-input connector the gain (amplification) will be lower and when you correct this by upping the volume on that channel, you'll hear more hiss and background noise. When you say "...


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