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Theoretically, the "bang" is suppose to produce a perfectly instantaneous amplitude peak. If you convolve a signal with your full impulse response, you will get the original signal mixed with its reverb in the recorded space, which is what is expected usually. But you can experiment with fading a very small part of the beginning of your impulse response and ...


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Recording 4 impulse responses for 2 playback channels is confusing. You could easy use a 2 channel impulse response to create a 2 channel playback signal. If you get a more detailed look, you will realize that you have with a 2 channel IR 'only' signal from hard left and hard right. But in a mix, you have signal from right which goes to the left channel an ...


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From my experience as a vinyl cutting engineer, the phase response makes it look more triangular in shape, but it sounds very similar.


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i-Simpa, An Open Source software for 3D sound propagation modelling http://i-simpa.ifsttar.fr/ seems to support arbitrary geometry (as your U-shaped room) and comprehensive materials : Material properties Define acoustic parameters by frequency band: absorption, transmission loss, scattering, scattering reflection law. Add material information (...


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Thing is that such a signal only exist in theory - practically this signal will be made up of a number of sine waves with varying frequency and amplitude. The generator or the sample rate format determines the upper frequency limit (i.e. how "sharp" that seemingly discontinuous signal edge will be a the corner/peaks). This alone will transform your step ...


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Guys who master vinyl will tell you something like this: - A pure step signal has an infinite spectrum and, considering you can't hear above 20kHz (a lot less as you get older) there's no point doing what you suggest. You may then say "oh please do it" and the vinyl mastering guy might say "OK we'll give it a go" and then completely ignore your request ...


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I'm not familiar with reverb specifically, but from my general knowledge of signal processing, since you haven't gotten an answer already: I expect that “LR” and “RL” are “the sound of an impulse emitted at the left position and heard at the right position” and “the sound of an impulse emitted at the right position and heard at the left position” — which is ...


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