10

Well, it depends! The first important consideration: what style do you play / wish to record? For a classical performance, you need quite a different sound than for a folky dance tune, a jazzy improvisation or even a rock or metal lead role. The main part of the differences in sound is the room component. For a classical recording, you want a good-sounding ...


5

The audio interface would be used instead of your sound card. The laptop itself shouldn't play a role in the quality of the sound. (Though it can happen... see @left's comment below) The sound quality will be affected by the signal chain. I.e., the original audio quality, the settings of the software you use to edit the audio, the interface you ...


3

First off, if you have a hard floor like cement or wood or tile...get an area carpet. Otherwise, you need to use absorber panels. Generally acoustic studio treatment requires 3 devices....bass traps, absorbers, and diffusors (heads up, you won't need all of them). Bass traps, trap bass in the corners of rooms to prevent standing waves (spikes in bass ...


3

After so many years standing for this annoying buzzing sound, I decided to spend some time to find and eradicate the problem at the root. I hope that sharing my problem and the solution here may help other people. Problem identification The first step in solving the problem was to identify it, and find its name. As long as we can't precisely name a problem, ...


3

For recording violin, I tend to favor a small diaphragm condenser such as the Nuemann KM-184 as my 'go-to' choice. It doesn't have to be a Nuemann though ... the truth is that there are so many good choices in small-D mics out there that you can find a good sounding mic at almost any price point. I typically position the mic above the instrument by 12-16 ...


2

Acoustics is a deep subject, but here is a pretty good primer: http://ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html That said, a simple and excellent solution is to make absorption panels yourself. Make a frame from 1x4 inch wooden boards (fir, plywood, whatever). Cut a 4 inch sheet of mineralwool to fit inside the frame (or dimension the frame to take a whole sheet), ...


2

I think I was reasonably lucky when I bought my Mackie HR624 speakers - I just trawled the net and these seemed to be recommended the most (for my budget back in 2009 of about £500 a pair). Now I know what to look for because what follows was the first (and most important) lesson I learnt when I plugged them in: - So, I plugged them in and went straight ...


2

Go with the audio interface. The "mixer" borders on useless. It is basically just a cheap interface with some near useless features worked in to it. You are paying for unused features rather than an audio interface that includes a clean pre-amp and quality ADC. You want an audio interface for your purposes. The reason to go with a mixer would be if you ...


2

The key difference is calibration: a hand held sound meter, even a cheap one, has been calibrated in the factory. Your app and phone (microphone, internal preamp, dac) aren't. If you find a way to calibrate your app - most apps have a calibration setting - using a reference sound source or a calibrated SPL meter, you can improve the usefulness of those apps. ...


2

Internal soundcards may give you accurate A/D conversion but get let down by compromises in the audio chip. There can be noise from the surrounding electronics, and the chip itself is optimised, often, to handle a partially amplified domestic capsule mic plugged straight in - so it's neither a proper high-level line-in nor a low noise mic-in. Going ...


2

To fully understand this subject takes years of learning and experience. You have to start at the beginning. My advice would be to find good books and study these subjects: Read this book by Martin Russ; Sound, Synthesis and Sampling and use it as a reference for the next bits.. Synthesis basics: Analogue additive/subtractive synthesis Learn exactly how ...


2

All hard parallel surfaces are your enemy. Since the space has already been built out you can't (I'm assuming) easily make the walls non-parallel. So you're really left with applying treatments. Some form of sound absorbers would be the most logical first step. Depending on the floor material (and what you can or willing) do with that) you may also need ...


2

You could do most of that list with an iPad & a USB/Lightning interface, these days... or any computer. GearRank - The Best iPad Audio Interfaces has a list of current offerings, with reviews. There is also software, free & paid, for recording. Just as an example, see http://www.ikmultimedia.com & look at the drop-menu links for Products > ...


2

"...is that statement true?" No, that statement is wrong. Whilst they are more sensitive they're are still directional and will reject sound from the sides. Most home studio owners own a condenser.


2

"Most people have noticed that when a speaker of any size is placed against a wall, it’ll deliver stronger bass response. This can be a strong temptation to use this acoustic phenomenon (a function of standing waves) to provide some additional heft, especially from smaller (less than 8”) woofers. But this room-enhanced bass will have an uneven frequency ...


2

In a tiny room like that, with unspecified materials, the quickest way to find out is to try it. My optimum in a home studio ended up being this… My ceiling is also partially sloped. Room is approx 15'x12'x10'. There is no real scientific rationale for this layout working. It just started out as the best way the gear fit in the room, but measurements ...


2

Record the two mics as two channels. Then you can decide what you want to do when mixing. As this seems to be very uncommon, there probably is a reason. Only way to know for sure is to test it (takes about 15 minutes, so why even ask here? )


1

Ditto other comments but you can fast track on sound engineering by taking the FutureLearn course CRITICAL LISTENING FOR STUDIO PRODUCTION (Free, 6 weeks, 8 hours per week). this is a beginners course for sound techs. My own experience started with listening to lots and lots of tracks of different genres to get a feel of how music is put together. Listen ...


1

Marc w is right. It takes years. I've been studying audio engineering for 14 years including 4 years formal training acquiring a BSc and an MA. And there is still so much to learn you'll never learn it all. I concentrate now on sound design for film and have abandoned such things as musical theory and music production and music recording as I simply will not ...


1

I own the sontronics stc 3x and use it at home all the time it has a unidirectional polar pattern which helps to reject some of the background noise , and quality turns out to be decent.


1

Simplest setup… Some kind of audio interface, 2-in, 2-out - there are a myriad. I use a Line6 UX2 at home, simple but effective. Has 2 mic in [+phantom, if needed], 2 line in [guitar] & 2 line in [keyboard] of which it can use any 2 at one time, but not all 6 at once. Line out to monitors plus 2x headphones [no separate control room out; that would take ...


1

As the previous answer already stated, you will need both an audio interface, and a DAW (Digital Audio Workstation), but I'll expand on this a little to get you started in the right direction so you can make an informed decision when acquiring these tools. The Interface To put it simply, an interface is a box that takes analog signals, and converts them ...


1

What's happening to the signal between the output of the Xenyx 802 and your recording software? Sometimes cheap soundcards do a bad job at converting analog to digital, so you end up with a lot of noise, like what i heard in your recording. If you can, try recording through the Xenyx into a different analog to digital system. Maybe you or a friend have an ...


1

If it sounds like from a tin can, tunnel, or outer space (whatever you mean by that) then there's something really wrong. It could be a lot of causes; one plausible is that you have an almost-feedback. Monitoring the mic through your surround system while recording is of course problematic because sound from the speakers keeps getting back in the mic. In the ...


1

There is more to mixing than gear. Out of the box, even good sound is going to sound funny and off, even if you have everything setup correctly. At a minimum you need to equalize a microphone to have it sound decent and you really probably want to be applying some dynamics to it as well. The problem you are experiencing may be related to your setup or ...


1

I use to work at a local news station. In their edit bay they choose to carpet the entire room, floor and walls that is. for them that was a more price efficient choice. The solution worked very well.


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