10

Well, it depends! The first important consideration: what style do you play / wish to record? For a classical performance, you need quite a different sound than for a folky dance tune, a jazzy improvisation or even a rock or metal lead role. The main part of the differences in sound is the room component. For a classical recording, you want a good-sounding ...


6

I don't think it's coming from your microphone because there is a small stereo width to the noise at all frequencies. The microphone can only produce perfectly mono sounds. Here's an enhanced spectrum of the noise: - Very noticeable are the sequence of peaks at precisely 1kHz, 2kHz, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 (not 8), 9, 10, 11, 12kHz etc.... These are very unlikely to ...


5

The audio interface would be used instead of your sound card. The laptop itself shouldn't play a role in the quality of the sound. (Though it can happen... see @left's comment below) The sound quality will be affected by the signal chain. I.e., the original audio quality, the settings of the software you use to edit the audio, the interface you ...


4

The point of sound absorbing foams is that they a) have lots of air spaces and b) have angles that divert sound. The second part is relatively easy, but making sure to get consistent sound absorbing characteristics of the appropriate type of foam, along with the appropriate amount and size of air spaces and an acceptable level of durability does make it ...


4

These days it is often simplest to record into Cubase or a similar DAW as multi tracks as you then have the flexibility to do what you want, such as re-record the vocals or add another guitar layer. Set up all your inputs individually to make sure none are so high level they distort on recording but are not so low that you can heart mains hum over them. ...


4

An example of a specialized software to record LPs and cassettes LP Ripper (commercial): Optional any software that can record the line input will do, for example: Audacity (free) (see also this link for instructions on how-to) GoldWave (shareware) Record the whole side and then go in a chop up into segments, and save out.


3

For vocal work, they (most music stores) have a product that wraps half-way around the mic. I have used them myself, and they work very well. They cost a bit, but are substantially cheaper than treating an entire room.


3

Well, it turns out that our worthless electricition did not properly ground the outlets in this room - I used a tester to verify this. This would explain the humming noise in my recordings and also some other unmentioned audio problems I've had in the past. I'm going to fix the grounding for the outlet and assume this problem will be solved. I was able to ...


3

For recording violin, I tend to favor a small diaphragm condenser such as the Nuemann KM-184 as my 'go-to' choice. It doesn't have to be a Nuemann though ... the truth is that there are so many good choices in small-D mics out there that you can find a good sounding mic at almost any price point. I typically position the mic above the instrument by 12-16 ...


3

To quantify this problem, you want to know the difference between your recording level ("how high the meters are when you're making sound into your mic") and the noise level ("how loud things are when you aren't making noise"). In simple terms, the difference between these is called signal/noise ratio, or SNR. When you boost the signal, you are also boosting ...


3

You should start simple. If you didn't already have some gear, I'd suggest a cheap digital recorder like the Zoom H2. Since you already have a mixer and some mics, just use two in an X-Y pattern and see how that sounds.


3

You should check out this site. He is very helpful but you must read his requirements for activity on his forum very carefully. http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index.php. Also this http://www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html Bass trapping is the main place to start. I wont explain bass trapping here as you could spend months studying it but I can tell you ...


3

Well, first of all, you will need a microphone. The cheaper the microphone, the worse you will sound. In the way of software, if you are on Windows, you won't even have to download anything: Just go Start Menu - All Programs - Accessories - Sound Recorder. Or you can use Windows Movie Maker, (NOT Windows Live Movie Maker). For Mac you can use Garage Band, or ...


3

After so many years standing for this annoying buzzing sound, I decided to spend some time to find and eradicate the problem at the root. I hope that sharing my problem and the solution here may help other people. Problem identification The first step in solving the problem was to identify it, and find its name. As long as we can't precisely name a problem, ...


3

First off, if you have a hard floor like cement or wood or tile...get an area carpet. Otherwise, you need to use absorber panels. Generally acoustic studio treatment requires 3 devices....bass traps, absorbers, and diffusors (heads up, you won't need all of them). Bass traps, trap bass in the corners of rooms to prevent standing waves (spikes in bass ...


2

It seems to me that you are rushing the process of finding your TR-808. I keep a list of interesting synths that I'd like to acquire. The list is divided into two parts, the new part and the old part. Every so often, I move some of the synths from the new list to the old list. If a synth is no longer interesting, it gets deleted. I actively look for synths ...


2

First, run some routine maintenance on your computer. If it's making some serious ticks, whirs and clicks there may be a bigger problem. If it sounds like a small turbine engine every time you boot up, open up the case and give it a good once over with a can (or two) of compressed air. Be sure to hit the fans, they're typically very noisy culprits. If the ...


2

It's difficult to answer because the microphone is but one link in the chain, and you don't mention what else you're using. Having said that, the B1 is probably sufficient for basic studio recording. I've not used one myself, but there are many ways to overcome one deficiency or another. If your mic is the weak link in the chain, a top notch preamp can ...


2

I think I was reasonably lucky when I bought my Mackie HR624 speakers - I just trawled the net and these seemed to be recommended the most (for my budget back in 2009 of about £500 a pair). Now I know what to look for because what follows was the first (and most important) lesson I learnt when I plugged them in: - So, I plugged them in and went straight ...


2

The single most important things are to make sure you feel like you are charging appropriately for the work you put in, and to tightly scope the work, with specific acceptance criteria, usage and contract terms. Even if it is a short deliverable, if your preparation time is going to be many hours due to a specific build then you should budget for that. If ...


2

Acoustics is a deep subject, but here is a pretty good primer: http://ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html That said, a simple and excellent solution is to make absorption panels yourself. Make a frame from 1x4 inch wooden boards (fir, plywood, whatever). Cut a 4 inch sheet of mineralwool to fit inside the frame (or dimension the frame to take a whole sheet), ...


2

Software: Reaper costs $60 for personal or commercial use that grosses less than $20k annually. Audio interface: used MOTU 828 mk2, easily found on eBay or Craigslist for under $300. PC or mac with 4GB+ of RAM and a reasonably modern dual-core CPU. Under $1000 for a desktop, under $1500 for a laptop I'd start with Reaper on whatever machine you have now, ...


2

It's not going to be possible for less than tens of thousands of dollars. Even if you have free reign to modify the building as needed, it's still generally easily 5 to 10 grand just to soundproof a room well. In order to do that when you can't modify the building extensively, you'd basically have to build your own isolated room and then soundproof that. ...


2

I'm more of a live audio guy than recording and tend to use in-ears for my monitoring, but my understanding of the idea behind isolation pads is to absorb the vibration of the speaker and/or the surface and prevent it from impacting the sound produced by the driver. Something like a computer monitor stand is going to be more worried about providing a hard, ...


2

I would consider the most important "rule" of monitor placement to be the geometry. That is... You should have an equilateral triangle made up of the two monitors and the listening position. You should consider the tweeters to be the points from which you measure, as the higher frequencies are the most directional. As an example, for my home theater, I ...


2

The key difference is calibration: a hand held sound meter, even a cheap one, has been calibrated in the factory. Your app and phone (microphone, internal preamp, dac) aren't. If you find a way to calibrate your app - most apps have a calibration setting - using a reference sound source or a calibrated SPL meter, you can improve the usefulness of those apps. ...


2

Go with the audio interface. The "mixer" borders on useless. It is basically just a cheap interface with some near useless features worked in to it. You are paying for unused features rather than an audio interface that includes a clean pre-amp and quality ADC. You want an audio interface for your purposes. The reason to go with a mixer would be if you ...


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