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Simple frequency intervals generally sound good. Our auditory processing parts of our brains appreciate simple relationships. A perfect fourth has a 4:3 frequency ratio and a diminished fifth (arguably not a very pleasant interval) has a 45:32 frequency ratio. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_ratio https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music) If ...


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You have a slight misunderstanding of what a wave is. Your ears (or an oscilloscope) will hear the sound of pressure increasing and decreasing. That's what sound is. The air in your ear can really only move in or out, so there is only one "waveform" it is sensing, no matter how many frequencies are in that waveform. No aggregation is required. It ...


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You're looking at it the wrong way round. The square sounds like it does because it is made up of a fundamental frequency and a series of harmonics, whereas the sine wave just has the fundamental frequency. A square wave has harmonics at odd multiples of the fundamental frequency.


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Sadly "analog warmth" and "math transformation" are orthogonal. The former subjective and the latter precise. "Warmth" or any change to the audio implies distortion, in that the new audio is different than before. That said I would look at vacuum tube distortion vs. digital distortion (or mathematical distortion). I prefer and can hear the warmth of my ...


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Particular intervals don’t sound good — they sound familiar. It all comes down to what you are used to. Which intervals were used in most of the music you have heard in your life, depending on its musical heritage. How trained your ear is to appreciate various intervals. If you grew up in Texas and have listened to country music all your life, the ...


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You might find yourself here somewhere in between composing a melody and designing a timbre, even if you are focused on atmospheric sounds. Chimes may not be playing a discrete melody but they are typically already playing in a musical scale. I find no reason to completely separate the two theories of Notes vs. Harmonics, just based on mathematics alone. ...


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The scale contains a whole jumble of harmonic relations in the sense of "harmony" - if you included all the notes, it would sound like an atonal smear. Stick with harmonics from researching bell sounds, analyze the spectogram of similar sounding chimes in audacity and note the harmonics. Use those as the basis for additive synthesis. It's not just the ...


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The best thing for you is probably something in between sine and triangle – the latter is itself in a sense something in between sine and square1, so a good idea might be to use the classical way of interpolating between sine and square: symmetric nonlinear distortion, aka soft clip. In fact, I daresay a bit of asymmetric distortion can't hurt either (...


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You should try using a noise generator or transform some other noise to lower frequencies by changing its sample rate. Don't use pitch shift because it will introduce many digital artifacts that you won't like. This way you can get a rumble sound with high momentum in many sub frequencies.


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Not entirely sure what you mean with the following phrase? a waveform stored in frequency domain representation? However, with FM the frequencies of the partials can be easily calculated as a function of the carriers frequency and the modulators frequency, such that C, C+M, C+2M, C+3M, etc. and C-M, C-2M, C-3M, etc. give the partials. Calculating the ...


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