4

All drives fail eventually, so a complete restorable backup is more important than how long any particular drive may last. All figures are bell-curves, one drive lasts 10 years, its twin fails on the first day; most last for around the mean time to failure figure the manufacturer may quote. That said, Backblaze use only consumer-level drives, as they have ...


3

I hate to bring bad news but I don't think you can have a single NTFS or HFS+J/HFSX filesystem that will work stable to read and write data across both Windows and OS X computers. In 15 years of fiddling with drives and all sorts of filesystems I haven't once found a software solution that would write in a reliable way to a non-native FS, especially long ...


2

The audio processing speed is dependent entirely on the speed of the CPU and RAM in the machine. Storing the DAW software itself on a slow hard drive will not have any effect at all on the processing speed. What will be critical however is where you store the audio that you are working with. Most DAW's will buffer audio to a certain extent, mitigating the ...


2

Sound should not be demanding on your hard drive at all. Even with numerous tracks, each individual feed in full 24 bit PCM should be only around 8 to 16MB per minute. It would take around 600 tracks to hit the data rate of a cheap modern hard drive. Seek time can be an issue, but that's better handled by investing in memory so that tracks can be cached ...


1

They do argument, that the OS does not need to run on a fast hard drive That maybe made sense a couple of years ago when SSDs were expensive and small, so you'd use them for the most critical data only. These days, the price difference is small enough to just go for the SSD for everything except archival storage. I have two computers from the same year, ...


1

Partitioning of SSD's is not particularly relevant as there is no particular difference in head seek time - there are no 'read/write' heads in an SSD. Partitioning was useful with magnetic platters as different portions of the spindle had different seek and performance times depending on the linear velocity of the head over the platter. Don't worry about ...


1

Performancewise it doesn't really matter if you create several partitions or stick with one: https://superuser.com/questions/808833/disadvantages-of-partitioning-an-ssd However the amount of data traffic in general matters, and with two discs you can split up the traffic, e.g. like so: Disk 1 (1 TB): One or two partitions: one for the system and one for ...


1

I suggest you eliminate from the single-point-of-failure of one external hard drive to something more robust. The question is not whether your hard drive will fail, but when. Messing around with filesystems will never rule out physical failures or an OS writing corrupt data. Option 1 - the external drives don't cost a lot, so why not buy two? There will be ...


1

I've got to say, this is fraught territory. At work I'm shuffling video files between a Mac, a PC and five FAT32 hard disk recorders. The Mac plays well with the FAT32 drives, but two of our NTFS drives have become munted whilst transferring with Paragon NTFS, and they are currently at the data recovery shop being scanned for salvageable material. Working ...


1

I've met no problems with Paragon software, but neither have with Tuxera NTFS-3G. If your main computer runs Windows, then it's probably easier to have the drive use NTFS and have the Mac access it (NTFS drives can be read, but not written to out-of-the-box. Write-support comes with those 3rd party software.).


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