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5

It's more about practicality than of necessity. Imagine a guitar with one pickup and no volume or tone knobs. You're right, this would produce slightly less noise (probably less than the noise floor you'd get on any recording - but in theory any component passive component will add some noise). However, you would probably want control your volume/gain ...


5

There certainly isn't one single reason, and, yes, “that's just how it's always been” is probably an important point. However, I would quite agree that guitars should not be part of a standard orchestra: for the same reason pianos aren't, and shouldn't be, part of an orchestra. Orchestral music takes a lot of its attractiveness from the art to ...


5

I am somewhat reluctant to answer the question, due to the fact that I cannot find any further info (such as manuals) for that Leem LMM-6S mixer. I did found a Leem HM-624 which looks at least somewhat similar, but that didn't allow me to download the manual either. Without further information, wiring diagrams, and details on the actual PA system, the only ...


5

I wouldn't record using FX unless I was very sure about the end result I wanted and how it would sit in the mix, just to leave my options open since you can't go back and remove the FX. On the other hand, if the FX are an integral part of the performance then it might be a good idea to record after the FX. Sometimes the performer might hit a 'sweet spot'that'...


4

Another consideration: assuming your guitar has at least two sets of pickups, if you didn't have what's essentially a mixer on/in your axe, you'd need to pass more wires to the remote preamp. That not only increases the complexity of the patch cord but increases the risk of crosstalk and interference pickup.


4

If you want to do more percussive in your acoustic guitar, I remember that Fishman has developed their onboard-preamp, which I use. It's a preamp that combine undersaddle piezo with built-in mic beneath the preamp. Named "Classica Blend" or "Presys Blend". Or if you prefer microphone, you can use Eric Clapton style. While playing acoustic guitar with both ...


3

Behringer UCG102 is one of the cheapest guitar interfaces for PC/MAC. It costs a little over £20 but not that much. However I'd advise against buying the cheapest interface. If you can't afford anything better at the moment, than I suggest to save some money and then buy the better interface. Otherwise after playing for couple of weeks it may turn out that ...


3

It's generally expected that you do a little bit of research before asking questions here and that you only ask one question. In this case the manual for this device answers the question quite clearly. The Amp Out provides a 1/4 inch mono output of guitar processed with amp modeling and effects and optimized for connecting to the input of a guitar ...


3

I usually find that SM57s accentuate distortion/tinniness when the mic is pointed at the center of the speaker cone. My preferred placement is 45 degrees off-axis, aimed between the outer edge of the cone and the outer edge of the speaker. Tends to give a fuller reflection of the "sound in the room"... I'm not sure that this would totally mitigate your ...


3

Vocal isolation/eliminations plugins generally work on the principle that lead vocals are centered and are going to have a particular EQ range. Guitars don't really have any such standards. Your best bet is to just run it through a parametric EQ and fiddle with it until you find the frequency bands that only have the guitar sounds in it. However, a guitar ...


3

In addition to @frcake's excellent answer, I have a few points: I have been gigging for over 30 years and I still have trouble getting some sounds I want. One solution that most guitarists go for is to have many guitars. All of mine sound slightly different, sustain, wood tone, pickups, bridge, electrics, resonance etc. Some have higher action or greater ...


2

A microphone is definitely the best solution, sound-wise. And indeed almost certainly cheaper than anything built-in, if it is supposed to sound anywhere as decent. You don't necessarily need a large-diaphragm mic, though it should be a condenser. Small-diaphragm ones are available for as little as 50$ these days; you may want to spend a little more (e.g AKG ...


2

It depends on what features the 1/4 inch supports, but at best it would tie the XLR. Most likely, the XLR is the better option. XLR cables are balanced, which greatly reduces the amount of noise they pick up. 1/4 inch cables can support a TRS mode that uses a balanced signal, but often (most of the time) for guitar cables, they do not. It is possible in ...


2

There's of course plenty of ways to do that. The easiest way on Windows would certainly be to load both a SoundFont synth and an amp-simulator plugin into a DAW, but I suppose that's not the solution you want. If you'd like to keep it down to a single executable and, as I suspect, you're more interested seeing in how intonation influences distortion-...


2

Unfortunately it is tough to generate a good sounding distorted guitar using only digital means. Although as sampling gets better this is slowly getting better as well. Your idea of sampling a clean guitar sound and then routing it though a distortion unit and back into your DAW would be the route I would take assuming you cant get your hands on a real ...


2

I'm only guessing the amp out is meant to go to a guitar amp, so it's probably mono and has a level and impedance more like an electric guitar would have. Line 6 got started with guitar effects, so this almost certainly is there to allow you to use your computer and this interface as a virtual effects pedal board. The optical out is an output from the ...


2

Internal soundcards may give you accurate A/D conversion but get let down by compromises in the audio chip. There can be noise from the surrounding electronics, and the chip itself is optimised, often, to handle a partially amplified domestic capsule mic plugged straight in - so it's neither a proper high-level line-in nor a low noise mic-in. Going ...


2

I've made this For about $6 total. It's a simple impedance matcher that allows you to use your own sound card. If you feel like tinkering, you can't really get cheaper than this. The quality is okay-ish, and could certainly be improved by fiddling with the capacitance a bit and adding more shielding. For anything more serious, I'm using a modelling unit; ...


2

That looks like a piezo-electric transducer, which wouldn't need a battery. Most types of pickup don't use batteries, as far as I can remember. I can't say why you're not getting any output, though.


2

Fender Stratocaster (or other twangy sounding guitar, anything with a single coil pick up should do), through a compressor, DI into your DAW, then apply light digital delay in post production. You will need to find some one to play the part though.


2

You should really ask the studio how they want it done. I am doing similar jobs for clients and here is my advice on how you should do it. As long as your audio interface has a Hi-Z or Instrument input you're good. Radial, one of the reamping pioneers, does recommend using a DI for tracking though: Start by recording with the industry standard Radial ...


2

This sound can be achieved with a spring reverb and a short delay (< 100ms). Delay before the reverb. Along with this western sound in general you often also hear tremolo and chorus effects. Here, though, it is very subtle - if there at all. Try a gentle chorus. Also (depending on your guitar model): try switching to some of the center pick-up ...


2

Everything about your signal chain sounds correct except for the mixer to the pc. It sounds like you want to use your mixer as an interface, in which case you'd want to use the USB to connect to your pc, not the speaker output. Once connected, you'll need software on the pc to be able to record. You could go the freeware route and get Audacity, but there ...


2

As a rule of thumb, closer to the center is trebly , closer to the ring is mellower - more bassy. Electric guitar recording is a world of it's own, many people go to insane extends to hunt the tone they want. First you have to fix the tone way before the recording stage, for instance in a song as soft as the one you posted, you can't just have an accented ...


1

I did a pretty poor job of soldering, but I think the connections are viable. So aside from that, is there anything else that this could be indicative of? Poor soldering = short circuits = not working. Diodes/transistors/chips soldered back to front = not working. Too much heat (due to poor soldering techniques) on certain components = broken components ...


1

That circuit will not really give overdrive. It will give you a fuzz based distortion, as the diodes clip the signal. There are a couple of tricks used in the circuit to make that clip less harsh, but that's really all this circuit does. The 'parts' or components used are not really relevant here to make it more 'overdrivey', because to make an overdrive ...


1

No DI needed. Just your 1/4" guitar cable straight to the "line in" on the MBox. The output of the guitar is an unbalanced line level signal. The MBox is designed to take that input on either input 1 or 2. Page 34 MBox 2 Mini Manual


1

A different setup may give you a better sound but that depends on what you get. In a nut shell your pedal is acting as an A/D converter. In other words its taking you analog guitar output and converting it to a digitized wave form. It does say the unit has 96K sampling (although quality will also be had with bit depth) so it does presumably sample at a high ...


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