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5

It depends on what you want to do. With just FMOD Studio, you can build complex events with parameter-driven effects, detailed internal signal routing, randomised elements, and internal trigger logic of a variety of different flavours. You can also mix your project, devise snapshots and sidechains to alter how it behaves under particular circumstances, and ...


4

Having the animations and the visuals together at the last minute is part of the game development process. Unlike film, the idea of post production phase in the traditional sense doesn't really exist. Working without or with limited visuals is an important part of the skill set of a game audio designer, what you are effectively having to do is work in ...


3

Ask for a gameplay video showing different scenarios in game and start working on sounds on top of that video. I've found it's much easier in most cases than trying to describe things just with words. Later you can use this video to show the client how you would have implemented the sounds in game. If possible getting an unfinished version of the game could ...


3

Well, it's difficult/impossible, if you can't see anything. So ideally you should always see something prior to doing something. But the game development cycle can be such that the audio can be left little time to work on the sound after the code and graphics are already in place (basically, you mostly start your job, when the others have already finished ...


3

As a game sound designer for over 20 years, I'll second all that has been said already! Know tools, know processing, know storytelling, know coding or at least scripting. You might consider taking some acting and directing classes while at the University; I found myself on many occasions doing voice casting and directing and my experience in the theater was ...


3

I agree with everything @Internet Human said. I've worked professionally at a studio for almost five years and relationships are everything. The people who really understand that what we do is fundamentally a service industry and structure their work philosophy around that are the ones who go the furthest. Relative to a lot of disciplines, the social ...


3

Focus on relationships. Knowing how to use sound is just a start, but just knowing the craft is not what's going to keep you employed, it's people. A nice portfolio will show that you've done something, which can be both a topic for discussion and an artifact/asset. In job seeking it's what you'd mainly use in order to get to interviews. But past those, ...


2

Hey James, Cool stuff, the effects are organic and blend well with each other. I will say, though, that the trailer is extremely ambiguous... without the title of the game at the end I would have absolutely no idea what I was watching. So while one of my critiques was a lack of identity for the sound design, I realize that much of that is due to what's ...


2

Do some research on 8-bit/chiptune. This previous question should be a good starting point: Native Instruments 8-bit Chiptune


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Here is a link to a 6 min you tube video on how to make this "shing" sound. I always thought of it as a sword sound effect. The guy in this video makes it from three different sounds. The first is a bass layer that he says he got by shaking a belly dancer's scarf (like http://www.ebay.com/itm/Belly-Dance-New-Chiffon-Hip-...


1

I would mix the tracks on Studio Monitors, but reference it with other game Dialogs, then check on the laptop and make the proper changes. In doubt always reference. Grab 2 or 3 other tracks you like how they sound and mess with an EQ and a Compressor till you get there. Use an EQ match plugin if you need. Another tip would be to increase the lows of the ...


1

I remember, years ago, finding a little freeware program that generates 8 bit synth FX, but i can't remember what it was called. Here is a tool i found that does something similar. There seem to be quite a few options if you google something like "free 8 bit fx generator". Hope that helps!


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It very much depends on your point of view when developing the audio for a AAA game. From a programmers point of view then yes the additional middle-ware could very well be rendered obsolete in terms of simply implementing sounds into the game or scripting things. However when mixing and implementing audio it is of great benefit to minimize the amount of ...


1

FMod runs in Unity with a simple to implement Bridge. Then there are basic C# Scripts that you can use to replace the audio in any of the free to download Unity Tutorials. Good luck.


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I always say, when in doubt supply options. I'm not sure if that will completely help your problem. But just offer lots of options when it comes to sound design elements.


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Ask them for a few (like 3) references for games they are playing that are roughly similar to the game they are making. Go play those games and make video captures. Copy some of the key sounds you think would work from the reference games. Use these copies as a starting point for your new original work. Keep in mind that everyone needs to hear the sounds in ...


1

The best advice I can give is to ask questions. As a sound designer, you are the subject matter expert when it comes to designing a sound, not the client. The client may very well not know what they want. Ask about what the purpose of the sound is. Provide feedback and ideas on how that need can be met. Listen to their responses and flush out what it is ...


1

I've been a member for around 4 or 5 years now and live in Germany but used to travel regularly to Los Angeles for business. From my experience they do offer some great events (or at least did, last one I attended was at TODD AO in Santa Monica in 2008 or 2009 I think, no idea about more recent ones) and it does connect you with people but most of these ...


1

Yeah, it's really difficult if you've got nothing to go by. I always find it easier to have something visual on the timeline to design to. Ideally this is a video capture of the gameplay, you can then design your variations to the picture and put them in the places where the game would trigger them. You can even put in a music temp track or atmos to help ...


1

Yes, I agree, contacts are everything! The thing you need to understand about degrees is that education is an industry like any other industry. They are trying to sell you products (degrees) and of course they try to make it look like you will benefit greatly from these products. But the reality is that especially in media, almost everyone can finish a ...


1

There's allot of this sort of stuff in online dev diary's. Search for sound or audio over at gametrailers.com and you'll find loads.


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Limbo Plenty of research on the game audio of limbo (Martin Stig Andersen)


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My suggestion would be to just download Wwise (it's free to download) and follow the internet tutorials from Audio Kinetic. There's certainly no harm in familiarizing yourself with audio middleware, and a lot of companies explicitly ask for middleware proficiency as a prerequisite. Certainly not all companies expect you to know programming or ...


1

I think... For large teams, just solid sound skills as it's easier and hypothetically better to keep people focused on just their main proficiency and what they enjoy doing the most and hire people that master and are willing to work on that one area. It's not wise to overload people with work or multiple roles and there might not be need for some kind of ...


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Hi there. I use Logic 9 and save PCM Wav at 22050hz and play back is fine. I'm not sure why you're getting problems with the speed? 20mb goes a long way if you use it efficiently. Keep files sizes low by saving as mono, keep SFX to <0.5sec. Loop SFX for longer instances. Use pitch changes to create variations.


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Pinnacle College has a comprehensive game audio program http://www.pinnaclecollege.edu/video-game-sound-design-programs - A lot of schools offer just a few classes in game audio or you need to enroll in a program not totally dedicated to interactive/game audio but as an adjunct or a minor. There are also a lot of really good DIY type courses - check out ...


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I wrote a blog post on that exact topic. It's an in depth look at breaking in based on my experiences and many others that gave me tips along the way. Here is a link. Please comment on the blog if you found it helpful. It's nice to hear that the posts are making a difference :) http://www.aaronbrownsound.com/advice-how-to-break-into-the-professional-audio-...


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