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8

Leonard Paul and Gordon Durity, 2 of the bigger names in game audio (as I understand it anyway), have this online course: http://school.videogameaudio.com/apply That aside, I'd say keep practicing your sound design skills on trailers etc (plenty to download at www.gametrailers.com), and start looking at the tools used by games developers. Wwise and FMOD are ...


6

For interface sounds you can use recordings of small stones, metal parts, ice, breaking glass etc. Take snippets not from the most loud parts of the sample, but from the tail. Build your sound from several elements to make it sounding nice. In some cases, add melodic elements (bells, mallets).


5

It would be better to create them by yourself. Download FamiTracker, spend about 2-3 hours on reading the tutorial and studying examples, then voila - you get a handful of NES sounds. :) Also pay some attention to the YMvst plugin.


5

It depends on what you want to do. With just FMOD Studio, you can build complex events with parameter-driven effects, detailed internal signal routing, randomised elements, and internal trigger logic of a variety of different flavours. You can also mix your project, devise snapshots and sidechains to alter how it behaves under particular circumstances, and ...


4

When I have to deal with a generic Hud, I usually come with fm synthesis first . The flexibility and the control of the fm process help the creation of a large variety of tones which can cover all interface actions (validation, error, cancellation, rollover, etc...). Plus this sounds particularly clean on small device speakers. For a themed menu I try to ...


4

most interface sounds regardless of style need to be incredibly short. start with drum samples. Real kits or samples from electronic kits. Process some hi hats and layer them on top of processed kicks for a starting point. Take any sound that has a transient and just trim around the transient...just those few milliseconds. Once you have a bunch of these you ...


4

http://www.drpetter.se/project_sfxr.html sfxr is a wonderful tool. It was created in 2007 for use in game jams where the creators didn't have time to worry about searching for sounds. It's highly tweakable, but at its core, in my opinion, is the "randomize" button. After a few clicks, you are bound to land on an interesting new sound that fits your needs. ...


4

Chipsounds is fantastic and very user friendly. You can create some very authentic sounds using the presets. http://www.plogue.com/products/chipsounds/


4

I find Mario games usually very inspiring for UI & HUD sounds, and love borrowing their ideas. It basically comes down to creating fast and short tonal scales of mallet-like sounds that are in the same key as the background music. So ideally it's either you who's also writing the music, or you collaborate closely with the composer to ensure consistency ...


4

Having the animations and the visuals together at the last minute is part of the game development process. Unlike film, the idea of post production phase in the traditional sense doesn't really exist. Working without or with limited visuals is an important part of the skill set of a game audio designer, what you are effectively having to do is work in ...


3

Hey Michael! For learning by yourself I suggest you use either Unreal Development Kit or Unity 3D. They're both free and quite easy to get into. When I teach at Stockholm University I let my students replace the sfx in one of the UDK levels. It takes me about four hours to teach them the basics of the User Interface and implementation of audio. This is a ...


3

Always depends on what the overall ambience and feel should be of course. What type of game is it? I really enjoy the iPhone games that are on the app store, all of them have very nice menu sounds. Like the Halfbrick Studio games, Fruit Ninja for example. One interface (and overall sound in game btw) I really liked was "Bulletstorm". I know that isn't ...


3

Focus on relationships. Knowing how to use sound is just a start, but just knowing the craft is not what's going to keep you employed, it's people. A nice portfolio will show that you've done something, which can be both a topic for discussion and an artifact/asset. In job seeking it's what you'd mainly use in order to get to interviews. But past those, ...


3

I agree with everything @Internet Human said. I've worked professionally at a studio for almost five years and relationships are everything. The people who really understand that what we do is fundamentally a service industry and structure their work philosophy around that are the ones who go the furthest. Relative to a lot of disciplines, the social ...


3

As a game sound designer for over 20 years, I'll second all that has been said already! Know tools, know processing, know storytelling, know coding or at least scripting. You might consider taking some acting and directing classes while at the University; I found myself on many occasions doing voice casting and directing and my experience in the theater was ...


3

Well, it's difficult/impossible, if you can't see anything. So ideally you should always see something prior to doing something. But the game development cycle can be such that the audio can be left little time to work on the sound after the code and graphics are already in place (basically, you mostly start your job, when the others have already finished ...


3

Ask for a gameplay video showing different scenarios in game and start working on sounds on top of that video. I've found it's much easier in most cases than trying to describe things just with words. Later you can use this video to show the client how you would have implemented the sounds in game. If possible getting an unfinished version of the game could ...


2

Have you looked at the Source SDK (Valve softwares modding engine) - If I remember correctly there are a few maps that are freely available e.g. one of the first levels in Half Life 2. Basically you can replace all for this level, and add some of your own. I am pretty sure that UDK and unity have similar levels available to play with.


2

Depending on what the game calls for, there's two directions I tend to go in. Synthesized, which is usually more melodic and pitch based. Nice if you want to pitch your sounds to the menu music. Or you can use recorded and library sounds. A few months back I gathered kid toys from a bunch of people and spent the day recording everything I could. This has ...


2

Hi Melissa, I've once recorded a crowd for a similar battlefield situation. I had 15 men in a 15m by 5m relatively dry sounding studio. I recorded everything with 2 mic setups. A. xy B. spaced omni. Placement of the men and mic's was along the long wall, i don't remember exact distances. I actually layered these recorded 3 times to get this big attack feel ...


2

Do some research on 8-bit/chiptune. This previous question should be a good starting point: Native Instruments 8-bit Chiptune


2

Hey James, Cool stuff, the effects are organic and blend well with each other. I will say, though, that the trailer is extremely ambiguous... without the title of the game at the end I would have absolutely no idea what I was watching. So while one of my critiques was a lack of identity for the sound design, I realize that much of that is due to what's ...


1

What is you mandate, to simply edit, tops and tails or do you also need to rename or master the files? Your workflow will change considerably considering what you need to do :) If you're steering clear of levels you may also want to consider a stereo editor, much faster to fly through files with key commands. Pro Tools is great if you need to do multiple ...


1

I recently recorded a bunch of battle cries for a production of "Richard III" with an Audio-Technica BP4025 into a Sound Devices 722 at 24/96k (in case of pitch shifting). I was in the theater space where the play was being put up, which was a large black-box space that was a little live but not horrible. I set the mic up about 10 feet in front of the 15 ...


1

try ModDB or Indie DB for starters finding other people making games you can make sounds for them and have someone else implement them into the games. :) good luck I wanted to do it but now am sticking to film. ALSO: check out the books GAME AUDIO TUTORIAL & COMPLETE GUIDE TO GAME AUDIO


1

I dont think there's any specific genre that is suitable for beginners, just do whatever interests you most! To create sound for games you can use whatever software you want, putting sound into a game depends on the tools the game developer is using. Some game developers use audio middleware, such as Wwise or FMOD, to help implement sound. Middleware is ...


1

Puremagnetik has a super budget option ($12), for Logic, Live or Kontakt. Punchpak


1

Holy cow, what fun! Loved the end of phase one, what a neat idea.


1

Very cool. I did the first two, not sure I'll be bothered to go much further, but I think audio schools would absolutely lap this up. I'm going to forward it to a teacher mate of mine now. I think it'd perfect to give them for a homework. edit: urgh, I can't make out what the woman is saying from the lack of bit depth. shark? chalk? chock? Also, if i'm ...


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