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Hi guys, well here's a tip for you. Ive been using a Nuemann KMR81i for 90% of foley recording. Been doing foley for more than 25 years, so have tried it all. The 416 was the standard many years ago but it does have a nasty kick around 3k which really bites with chains, keys or foot grit, the KMR 81i is much warmer. The 416 is what I use for location foley ...


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What I'm wondering is: how many variations of each should I have? 3-8 variations (or as a rule of thumb, 5 variations) depending on the speed of movement (at faster speeds you tend to pick up repetition more easily). The pitch variation (and volume) that you can enable in game engines or audio middleware tools often does the rest. do I need to have ...


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the hollywood standard is a 416 for footsteps, though I've recently been considering running some experiments. the thing about footsteps is that you never run them very hot in a mix, so consequently noise floor is less of an issue than if you just listen to them in isolation. the real tricky part is smoothing out some of the swingier transients that grit ...


2

1) Try this question or this question to see what people have already discussed in terms of mic choice for quiet sounds. 2) For the bigger sounds you'll find that using multiple layers will get the results you want. Experiment with what you think might sound right - often the best results come from mistakes! 3) Not quite sure I fully understand what you ...


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I'd tend to think more about the characters than what they are literally wearing. Is one dude goofy and heavy-footed? Is one more nimble? Does Jimmy only have one leg? etc


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Andy Farnell has done lots of research in this area: http://obiwannabe.co.uk/tutorials/html/tutorial_footsteps.html http://obiwannabe.co.uk/html/papers/pdcon2007/PDCON-2007-FARNELL.pdf Depends how far you want to go with it! I agree that most commercial synths are not capable of doing this well. They are not designed to add in the random variations in ...


1

If you struggle to find a suitable library, you can create your own; if you can, try to record the footsteps of a person walking on the film location. Be aware though: it requires some gear (at worst a half-decent smartphone, at best a solid mic and a decent preamp and recorder), a decent sound technician and a decent sound engineer. I won't go into details ...


1

I have quite a large collection of different metal sheets of different thickness and size. I found that a lot of the time it is also what footwear is being worn will determine texture. Maybe experiment with hard soled shoes verses soft soled. Also, I sometimes place another piece of metal against the surface I am walking on to get an interesting resonance ...


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I haven't tried every combination of mics and preamps out there, but i can tell you what i use and am happy with: In the studio i use Sennheiser Mkh 50 or 40 with RME Fireface 800 for foley/small objects and sound fx. If i'm recording footsteps in stairs or loft i bring my Sound Devices 702. If you ever get out of your cave (recommended) i've found the Rode ...


1

You start from noise or noisy sounds (e.g. inharmonic FM or AM) and then you further shape them by filtering. That's the basis. Wavetable or other forms of "synthesis" could do as well, but those aren't technically synthesis, because they work on prerecorded audio. To make a complete footstep sound or multiple different footstep sounds is however too or ...


1

I reckon the most important aspect is to get the space right. If you just create some transients and get the right sounding reverb you will be 70 percent of the way there. I've never tried it but i would take the same route you are, using noise and wavetables. That way you can move through the table to generate subtle versions of different footsteps.


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The foley should be recorded in such a quiet environment that there is only negligible "fill". Don't fill foley. Just chop it off or put a short fade on the head and tail if you hear something. If you're creating an M&E, the background tracks, the effects stem and other added effects to replace production effects under the English dialogue will ...


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James, I do that all the time as well. It really depends on what's going on in the background, though. If there's music, or perhaps a lot of action happening, then filler will get lost under the noise floor anyway. If it's a simple diagetic dialog scene, then filler counts a bit more. My favorite trick is to go through the production sound and foley takes ...


1

@James I have done this exact thing that you are talking about. And yes, when extreme editing is required, I fill all the gaps. Most of the time there is enough space between each step to simply extend the region boundaries and cross fade (without creating a repeat). If not, I fill the gap with tone from elsewhere. You can definitely draw comparisons to ...


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Dude, just record yourself in a foley room. Footsteps on concrete blocks, metallic surfaces etc or just any surface that a warehouse would include and then add an IR reverb of a warehouse and you are good to go.


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I am in NYC as well, and I know of a few good locations like this, mostly on Long Island. I actually did a library a few years ago of just these kinds of sounds, and most of the footage came from spots on the island. Fair warning; They aren't exactly "open to the public" though. ;) Will shoot you an email. *Almost forgot! http://abandonednyc.com/


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I just read that Satellite View of Google Maps is extremely useful when you're searching for unique recording places.


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'KFootsteps' = Free Kontakt footsteps instrument. Click on 'Libraries' and then on download. 'Edward' = 59$ Kontakt Footsteps-instrument. And Google 'AudioSteps Pro' from 'Audiogaming' (Sorry I only get to share 2 links because I'm new on this site)


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