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It is not inevitable, but nor is it surprising – yes, it would call it normal. "Low cut" doesn't specify what the filter does exactly. Better models will either give a whole bunch of possible settings, or specify clearly the characteristic. If nothing is specified, the filter will generally be either A first-order IIR (aka HP6). The advantage of this ...


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I can't beat the Wikipedia page on crossovers, so I'll just block quote it: First Order First-order filters have a 20 dB/decade (or 6 dB/octave) slope. All first-order filters have a Butterworth filter characteristic. First-order filters are considered by many audiophiles to be ideal for crossovers. This is because this filter type is 'transient perfect',...


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The man page for sox is quite clear on this. The 'sinc' option defines two '6dB' points for highpass and lowpass boundaries to the bandpass filter. Thus, at these '6dB' points, the signal will be 6dB lower at the stated frequency. This is the reason why your overall volume is being lowered. Due to the width of the filter you are trying to implement, it ...


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There are methods of doing this very complex task. For example two-way communication software applications like Skype, Google Hangouts, etc. have methods of cancelling the speaker audio from the microphone signal. Suggest researching how they do it to avoid re-inventing the wheel. Don't expect that this is going to be either simple or easy. You may not ...


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You could start with a 2x6 preset (eg. low, mid, high), then adjust the crossover settings so that the passbands of the bottom 4 outputs are identical. Just because the Driverack labels one output MF or LF, and another one SF, does not mean that the frequencies handled by that channel have to match the label... You can change the crossover frequencies from ...


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Theoretical models may or may not exist for these effects, and may or may not accurately reproduce the actual effect -- there are so many variables and so many loose manufacturing tolerances. You may want to consider developing a model from empirical data. Set up a reference PA system, interpose several grilles, and measure the effect as you vary material, ...


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Could it be the filter resonance? http://beausievers.com/synth/synthbasics/#propertiesoffilters


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I have wandered about it a while back while using a low cut eq in logic, using a Linear Phase EQ instead of a regular eq solved this mystery. Unfortunately, I don't know the theoretical explanation behind it but I suspect that a regular eq can create unwanted phase artifacts and hence those picks in your signal.


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