10

I want to tell the story from the designer perspective and I totally agree with Rene's answer. I do sound design for video games. I always prefer non-edited files even if they require some extra work. Sometimes I find a very nice sound to fit my project but disappointed to see it was ruined because somebody assumed that it is better to add some fancy FX so ...


10

Library producer here (echo collective, echo collective:fields) regarding cleaning background sounds - All background fx cleaning is destructive and alters the source in some way. The reason this step is not done is because that type of work really requires context to be done well. In other words, if you place a sound with some background wind or ...


5

Most film is art, not life/reality. Sound designers have to match the visual art on screen with the sonic art of their mix, and that usually includes a certain amount of "realer than real", suspending some of what we "know" about physics in order to tell the story in a way that translates to this 2-dimensional, 2-sense media. Case in point, when we see some ...


4

Each individual grain in that loop is a complex piece with varying pitch through its course, repeated fast, but with space between each grain. There are numerous ways to do this, but myself I often use first and foremost my Commodore 64, and make good use of the "revolving waveform"-function it's so well known for, in combination with quick and heavy pitch-...


4

Usually the smaller more intimate sounds will provide the detail, so you'll have those larger, slower, heavier wave sounds as the body and you can provide movement and texture and detail with smaller splashes, sprays etc mixed in.


4

I had a listen to jetpack videos online and it sounds like there's two types. On one you can hear a combination of turbine noise (pitched) and filtered noise (unpitched) while on the others there is only filtered noise. TLDR: white noise through a coplex network of filters and EQs. So I'll start by the filtered noise which is not only more simple but also ...


3

The link here is not specifically about sound design in film but about how sounds get patented and are linked to certain products. I found it very interesting as to how a sound can remind us of something or make us do or buy something. I thought you might enjoy it. A neurological sonic trip. http://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-sizzle/


2

This guy, Fletcher901, is doing a good job - he explains how he makes the Predator sound too:


2

In star wars Darth Vader’s lightsaber is pitched to a minor key, while Obiwan Kenobi’s is pitched to a C major key. This is in 'Sound Design: The Expressive Power of Music, Voice and Sound Effects in Cinema' by Sonnenschein.


2

Gorillas walruses & time stretch. Godzilla was largely a leather glove on a detuned bass string, if I remember correctly. Depends on what's roaring though


2

I'm not sure you'll find a magic plug-in for this. The majority of the effect is performance from the actor and then some EQ, reverb and maybe a bit of distortion. Remember that an FX plug-in will enhance what is already there, but if it's not there is the first place (from the actors) no amount of processing will give you the magic you desire.


2

one character that sprang to mind is Arby from the Channel Four series 'Utopia'. If you haven't watched it, it's definitely worth checking out and the theme music is awesome too. Anyway, this character Arby has been given a continuous, out of breath foley aspect, almost as if he's really unfit. I'm pretty sure the majority of this has been added in post. The ...


2

If it's just dialog that you are recording then rent a couple lav mics if you can then make sure the audio coming off them is nice and usable. The problem with a hypercardioid mic in a reflective room like that is there are always going to be significant secondary reflections off of those hard surfaces. Because a lav is so close to the source those ...


2

I've always used things like jet engines and thunder from libraries and a mish mash of other odds and sods. Another trick I tried was to compress a sound until it distorts the converter, (you need to turn your speakers off for this) then send it to another channel and record it at a lower level. If you've ever played Titanfall you'll know the sound I mean. ...


2

Firstly, there is no set formula for this. You have to... a) train your ears b) use your ears. The only standard I would adhere to is to pick a loudness level and make sure your final mix conforms to that. -24 LUFS will be a good place to start. Always make sure that your dialogue is able to punch through the music and effects. Dialogue is king. You can ...


1

A/B is also called checkerboarding. You can use it for when a scene changes or anytime you need to apply processing that is radically different than the section of audio that came right before it. It can be used in other ways as well, such as if room tones aren't matching between shots and long fades are needed. I'm sure you already lay out tracks like ...


1

In addition to the very good answers here, I'd also add that most destructive noise reduction adds artifacts at certain points within the frequency domain, and while those are imperceptible in isolation, if you're layering multiple layers together which each have those artifacts, they can add up to being quite audible on their own. For example, MP3 encoding ...


1

Um, good question! I've actually never thought about it, we usually just call it "ear-ringing"! One "funny" thing though - in reality, I've studied a few people having suffered through hearing-damage through loud sounds (time spent in hell with tinnitus, hearing-loss and hyperacusis in different degrees...didn't envy them...), and for some reason none of ...


1

When they put that sound in there it usually means that the subject suffered hearing loss from an excessively loud blast of sound. I don't think there really is much else to take from it.


1

Basically, what the festival is saying is that for play back that is using a high end professional cinema distribution, they need to use particular speaker configurations. For your film, they are just using a standard bluray playback, so you can just burn a bluray disk with it and be fine. The exact way your sound will behave depends on how they have ...


1

It will play but probably won't sound as good as if it was mixed in 5.1 or 7.1. Because it's only the 2 speakers the sound will "pull" to the side for people sitting far off center. Other issues maybe be that it wasn't mixed with an X-curve and in a large room calibrated to theater levels. Your mix will most likely just come out the L and R speakers, ...


1

Anything like what your planning to shoot is going to require foley or sound design but I can't think of anything that is ever cheaper in post. The cost to put someone up for a couple days is about a half day of work in the cheapest post houses, factor in the additional foley and sound design needed plus ADR, thats way more than a half day.


1

I do sound design and post and the truth is that, in this case, everything can be done afterwards. Still, during the struggle I imagine there will be gasps, grunts, or other human noises. If you want to capture those for sake of performance, you can focus on that. If you don't care about those, I believe you can save the money from location recording and use ...


1

Wow, "Irreversible" I'm curious and want to go back and pay attention to the sound that you are talking about but I really don't want to see that movie again. I was really surprised with the sound design of the show HANNIBAL, specially that first episode on the first season.


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