3

The best sound is not from neither the mouth nor the chest, it's from the golden spot in between. See, the mouth gets you all the treble you need, and then some, whereas the chest is all core and bass. By forgetting your eyes altogether, and giving all your focus on the sound using the eyes for nothing but coarse guidance, you can find a softer, fuller, more ...


2

Really, I think only you can answer that question. Nobody here knows anything about you or what you could potentially get from the program, as what you get from education is not just about what you get out but what you put in. There are many other discussions on here about the benefits of getting formal education as a sound designer and it often creates ...


2

In my experience it depends on the microphone, voice of the actor and booming experience. The low end of a voice is created by the chest not the mouth. For intelligibillity the mouth is important, S an T's are pronounced at the lips. If you're a great boom artist, you can point at the chest (from above) in line with mouth. This way you get the best of both ...


2

Currently a student at Vancouver Film School's Sound Design Program.


1

I'm not aware of any reasoning in this regard. If it was the case that pointing at the chest is better, then we'd be far more likely to clip lapel mics to people's belts and we wouldn't make headset mics at all. The only reasoning I can think of is if they also were trying to get the sounds the actor makes outside of just dialog, such as footsteps and such....


1

Unless proximity/breathing/pops are any concern, then point the mic at the sound source - i.e., the face. The only reason I could think that anyone would say different is to preclude extraneous ambient noise.


1

Find some short animated videos/or university film student projects to practice sound design techniques on your own. Then simultaneously work really really hard to find someone who has credible skills and some sort of paying work coming in with films so that you can maybe go work for them for free or whatever small scraps they'll pay you to bust your butt ...


1

Like Mark said, only you can answer that question, and you might not be able to until years after, but as a VFS grad (SD50, December '11) I'll speak a bit about what you should know about the program. This exhaustive review was written by a friend of mine who graduated the class ahead of me, it's a must-read for anyone considering the program. http://beta....


1

Nope and it hasn't hurt my career at all. I often say, "College was the best twenty weeks of my life". As far as sound goes either you've got that creative spark or you don't. If you don't then no amount of school is going to help you. The vast majority of my favorite sound designers and FX editors have little or no formal schooling at all.


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I completed the Master Recording Program at the Conservatory of Recording Arts & Sciences. It's a full-time, fast-paced, intensive 10 month (approx.) program that focuses more so on the art of capturing quality sound at the source (mic techniques, phase alignment, wave theory, etc.) than sound design, per se. Much more emphasis on music production than ...


1

I graduated from Berklee College of Music in 1992 with a degree in Music Production & Engineering. The knowledge and experiences I gained from that major set me on the path to post-production sound, first for commercials and television and eventually to feature films and games.


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