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I thought I'd take a crack at an ffmpeg solution since it's always proved itself to be infinitely versatile for me. A cursory search of the ffmpeg docs found no useful references to ima4. However, I then realised that ima4 refers to the ADPCM IMA QuickTime codec. Back to the ffmpeg docs, and this appears on the list of supported audio codecs. Now we know ...


2

What you are dealing with is the sampling frequency or sampling rate of your audio files. And what you want to achieve is called sample rate conversion. There are many software that can deal with this process. Two examples come to mind to automate the process : SoX FFmpeg Simple example with Sox that will convert in.wav sample rate to 44.1 kHz and save it ...


1

Like said in the comments, the fist thing to do is to separate the frequencies we want to affect from the rest. This can be done using LPF/HPF combo to form a BPF (I find it easier to set my cutoff frequencies using 2 filters rather than a BPF because with BPFs you have a center frequency and bandwidth (Q) which requires some calculations to figure out the ...


1

You need a digital sampler. Most DAWs come with their own, dedicated software sampler but a great 3rd-party sampler is CWITEC's TX16Wx sampler since it's modeled after real hardware technology. Also, defined instruments in soundfonts can be configured to span the whole keyboard spectrum so double check and make sure they aren't limited to one key like you ...


1

Try dB poweramp music converter. That's what i've used for converting audio files. With the right codecs (which are free) you can pretty much convert anything to extension the you wish to use. As for finding the files you want to extract from ableton, just search around the ableton folder on your hard drive manually. They should be in there. Hit me back ...


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