5

I assume that you export sound in order to import it somewhere else. This process has a lot of details and used to be done in the step called "mastering" in the old recording days. I'm no expert, but I could try to give you some pointers. Your first choice is whether to compress or not. The best known example of compressed formats is probably MP3. ...


3

I took a look through Ableton and it is possible, though potentially more time-consuming depending upon how you have your session set up. If your edits are clean and each "ooh", "aah", etc. is its own separate region, bring all of the regions into the "session" view as clips. Make sure they are edited with proper start/end times using the start/stop ...


3

If you want to do good mastering you at least need to buy monitor speakers. That's my answer and will solve your problem. The following are just for discussion and will not solve your problem: Also you say But when I listen to this on a desktop computer, the sound SUCKS! You mean using the same headphones on the desktop computer, or do you mean you ...


3

This question is a bit out of context on a sound design q&a site, but easy to answer. Whenever you re-encode an already encoded soundfile (mp3>export to mp3) you lose more 'sound' information. Look up 'lossy' and 'lossless encoding' on wikipedia and you'll understand it better. Oh and in general it's easier for us to answer if you include more details. ...


2

I use Sound Forge for this kind of thing. It has a feature that lets you specify a list of processes to run your sounds through, parameters to use, file formats and locations to save to, etc. It will achieve what you need very easily, and it's quite a pleasure to watch it in progress, go away and come back later to find it all done. I recommend it! (It ...


2

The problem is not gear... Several grammy winning mixers use the standard plugins that come with their DAW. Most likely the natural EQ built into the headphones has a boost in the low/low mid range that artificially tells you the mix has enough of that frequency range. Use several pairs of headphones to sample how the mix sounds on each, as well as testing ...


2

Figured out a solution to this, can't believe it didn't hit me before: 1. Mix and edit the sounds with processing on individual channels, and master channel if necessary 2. Render the entire sequence, taking the output from the master channel. 3. Add this rendered file back into the set on a new audio channel. Right click this audio clip and choose 'Crop ...


1

I think that you possibly have set up a project in Audition at the wrong sampling rate. Make sure that you are fully aware of the sampling rate of all the audio you are using and that the project sampling rate matches.


1

I guess what you're asking is whether audio passes through an A/D or D/A converter and conversion when it's exported from a software e.g. Pro Tools. No it doesn't, because it's digital while it's stored (it's an audio file) and handled by the computer (it can be opened and edited with software programs), so there's no need to convert it at all or convert it ...


1

In short, no. The sound card is only engaged in the listening back of the audio. The processing of the sound is purely mathematical and done by your DAW much like a calculator.


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