5

Lower bit depths are not easily available simply because they are not looked for commercially, not because of some intrinsic technical difficulty. Audio interfaces or other capturing devices have their ADCs (Analog do Digital converters) based on integrated chips optimized for the features that are most requested commercially. In principle it would not be ...


3

Instead of simply listing practical details about how you're making your sounds (eg. types of mics, foley techniques and so forth), you might consider making more theory-based speculations about why certain sounds, or qualities of sound, are appropriate to convey the particular messages that you're trying to convey; how they create meaning for the listener ...


2

From the top of my head, the book "Sound Design" by David Sonnenschein is a very good start! I'm on my second read-through on it myself right now :-)


2

Although the focus is on sound design for theatre, Ross Brown's Sound: A Reader in Theatre Practice is a brilliant resource with a wide-ranging bibliography. 'Reader'-type books are great for initial research for this very reason: someone else has gathered all the essential reading into one book! As @Arran says, theory-based texts about why we use sound are ...


2

For there to be any chance of 'subtraction' to work, there must be a phase-relationship between the two signals, which there is not likely to be in any of the cases you suggest. To understand why there is no phase relationship, consider the fact that with AC the voltage varies between a positive value (where the electrons travel in one direction) and a ...


1

Traditional voice range was 300 Hz to 3000 Hz. But that was for telephones where only basic communication was the objective. For singing, you need to include at least a couple octaves of overtones. You can look up the musical scale of various voices and you can look up the frequencies from the names of the notes. Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


1

There are a couple of graphical programming languages that allow you to build completely new DSP effects, without actually needing to write program code. Max/MSP (together with PureData, its free sibling) is certainly the most renowned of these. I wouldn't be too sure if VST exporting works, but it seems in principle possible. Still, these programs are ...


1

There's a bunch of cool granular plugs on this site: http://www.michaelnorris.info/software https://valhalladsp.com/ also has a couple neat freebies


1

With some DJ software you can do it, but I think that this solution is not for Ubuntu: In Native Instruments Traktor, you can route each deck to a different output, but you need to have also a compatible soundcard (I mean, at least 3 outputs). You will be good with mono output because you talk about one speaker per track, so if a soundcard offers 2 stereo ...


1

For this setup, you will need : an USB external audio interface that offers at least 3 analog outputs. Check that the chosen interface software driver is well supported on GNU/Linux/Ubuntu. a software player that allow playing several tracks at once. It also must be able to route individual tracks to dedicated interface outputs. I am not sure that Audacity ...


1

I created a Max/msp patch and app that uses convolution reverb to generate drones of this sort: https://soundcloud.com/mark-durham/resonate-drone-selection Some seem quite similar to the sound you're aiming for perhaps? You can read more and download it here: http://sounddesignwithmax.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/creative-convolution-part-1-resonate.html ...


1

Some weeks ago I put an inexpensive electret capsule inside the tube of a stethoscope and recorded my stomach and my heartbeat. I paid about 2euros for the capsule and the recordings turned out to be pretty usuable.


1

It's not clear what type of gear you already have. But check out this video with Diego Stocco. He uses a stethoscope and I think he inserted a lavalier microphone in the tube. Not sure, but worth a try.


1

Pick up the book Audio-Vision by Michel Chion. It describes one version of the foundations of "using sound to evoke emotions in motion pictures". And draws examples and example film scenes to argue them. Arguing how frequency content "defines" emotion is not straightforward. Acoustically we can say that certain frequencies have certain qualities (e.g. soft,...


1

I once tried recording a video signal as audio on a vhs tape, if you squinted at it you could make out the original image on things with sharp contrast, it obviously did not get the colour burst so it was black and white, but it was better than i was expecting, a digital recording did not even manage that though, probably because it was trying to reproduce ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible