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13

This immediately reminded me, first off, of an excerpt for Dave Yewdall's book about the "Big Sound" (or Hollywood Sound): The "Big Sound" The key phrase being "It's a philosophy, an art - an understanding of what sounds good together to make a bigger sound." The 'Hollywood sound' is a gestalt, or culmination, of individual parts and pieces fitting ...


7

This is an interesting question, indeed. I agree with Tim and Utopia first and foremost, it does depend upon the scale, yet a lie is a lie. However my take though quite frankly is that what said person does or credits them self with is none of my business, so I won't make it my business. The same sort of thing hold true when, for example, I visit a ...


4

Here is how I look at it - don't use the stolen sounds, but imitate them using original material to the best of your ability. If the director wants the "hollywood" sound, show off your abilities by making your effects sound like the ones he or she is so fond of. Make this director want the "Melissa" sound. If you're worried about time already spent - don't....


3

I wouldn't be afraid to use any good recording I made for whatever purposes I needed them. Some of the greatest and most award winning photography in the history of the medium is of people in great pain or distress. That the photographer captured and then released the images doesn't detract from the art of what that was or from what that photographer was ...


3

Leave 'em alone. Karma kills both ways. Don't work for them because they will exploit you. Blah, this question puts chills down my spine. Here's to not encountering that situation....ever.


2

Came across this sort of thing on Twitter and the DUC a couple of weeks ago. The poor chap claimed to have worked on a popular UK series and the chap who was the sound super suddenly appeared on the thread. http://duc.avid.com/showthread.php?t=316520 How to kill a career before it's started. Credits are a funny thing. I agree with Tim in that they are not ...


2

Seems like a tough situation. Since you're not being paid for this I would stick to your guns, make your points to the director and get as many other people in the production team to back you up, I bet he wouldn't like it if you simply replaced a scene from this movie with one from another film... If this were a real world situation where you were being paid ...


2

It sounds like a major client management situation. What i recommend is taking a plank wood, about a metre long, then hammering some nails through one end... Ha, kidding. But you should never let a client make you do something that's "over the line" for you (i'm talking serious stuff, not just insisting on some cliche like a heartbeat or underground wind). ...


2

I think it's pretty obvious answer that to value a "rare" recording more than lives in danger would be a pretty dick thing to do. But no doubt that we/some tend to be dicks in many aspects, ignoring to help, when the loss or pain (which there always is) doesn't touch personally. The good way to go, in my opinion, would be to react like reporters/journalists....


1

I would answer this question by looking at art in general. Art is the expression of all that is human experience. Some art is beautiful and inspiring and some is dark and depressing. Both ends of the spectrum, and everything in between, represent human experience for better or worse. The reality is that horrible things happen. Art will express this ...


1

The only issue I see in this is at the moment of witnessing the event and whether one decides to help or not. If one has the ability to help then one should do so (and keep the recorder rolling). Apart from that, if you can't help, record away. Later I would check that there's no personally identifiable speech on the recording but if it's just "foley" then ...


1

Wow. Can't believe your 'friend' would dare to ask you this. It's the equivalent of him ripping off a Hollywood script and passing it off as his own. A) never compromise your own personal integrity. B) free gigs never turn out well. Tell your friend to start paying you min wage for the project. Money begets respect. Respect for your time and respect for ...


1

Get that conversation in writing. An ordinary email to the guy expressing your worries, then wait for the reply. Just in case......


1

The question can be understood in 2 ways, for me at least : A person claiming credit for someone who worked on the project "for them" and did all the work. In music it's called ghost writing. A person "pretending" to have done work, that he or she didn't do. I can only speak for myself, but in the second case (which I think you are speaking of), credit is ...


1

I agree with the others - how big of a credit are we talking about here? Is it a name-drop that he says he recorded an ADR session with an A-List celebrity to sound cool? Or is he trying to get others to believe he's someone he's not for personal gain far beyond that of brownie points at the local Akbar - let's say, 4 million dollars in a ponzi scheme? Ever ...


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