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Lots of great answers here! I think one of the most effective methods is the ascending pitch, as mentioned by several others. the reason this works so well, is that it targets a very primal reaction in us. Humans naturally/instictively try to sync ourselves with our surroundings, and this can bee seen in almost every area of our lives. We cry when others do,...


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While it's safe to say that most minor scales sound sad opposed to major ones who appear to have a happier quality to them - both major and minor share the same notes (as in A minor scale is the same as C major). Most music has a more complex musical structure and even has foley and sounds integrated nowadays so a mood detection algorithm should be pretty ...


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Hello Melissa, I had a lot of similar discussions last year in one of my my Master's program classes. We would talk about the concept of synesthesia and how it differed from individual to individual, so it was very difficult to design for all listeners. I agree with @NoiseJockey that "surprise" without external context (in the sense of "startling") is a ...


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I don't consider surprise a "steady-state" emotion like joy or sadness or fear. Surprise, while a legitimate emotion, seems like a reaction to a major change in state, context, other emotions, or expectations. Sound and music are all about surprise, but it's usually momentary. In terms of film sound, surprise seems to be usually handled usually by atonality ...


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Thanks for the link Steve... I love that sort of stuff! Maybe it's a post-thing, but I still find 1K tone to be an annoying sound... especially the longer it goes on. I think it might be because it's such an unwavering, unnatural sound (there's nothing really in the world that creates a pure sine wave). Case in point... [this][1] at around the 7:40 mark. ...


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The concept of rising sounds has been described in many answers, but one thing is missing: I have been using the idea of the Shepard–Risset glissando very successfully to create and (not to forget) to keep the tension. It's a rising sound, that never stops rising. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shepard_tone Either you create a rising Shepard–Risset glissando ...


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It won't be one property that will tell you the mood of a song. It will be an amalgamation of things. So I'm not saying each of these will 100% tell you the mood of the song. But they may, in part, give an indication. key signature chords present (amount of minor/major chords relitive/ratio) chord changes present (amount/which chords are they?) known chord ...


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