7

In simplest terms, the gain is used to adjust the strength (i.e. voltage level) of the signal, whether that be within the electrical components of the mixing board, within the software DAW, signal sent to magnetic tape, etc. Volume, on the other hand, is used to adjust the loudness of the signal as you perceive it, whether that is through speakers, or ...


5

In general, if you unplug anything from a power amp, you could amplify small currents into a pretty loud pop...which could be enough to damage speakers or amplification circuits. With phantom power, the problem is that when you unplug, the power to circuits is dropped quickly so you get current surges from inductors and capacitors, and these can be much ...


4

Try contacting Roland or your official Roland Service Center first. Korg and Yamaha both have reputations for helping out with their products even when they are long out of warranty. Roland doesn't have that reputation as much, but you should still start by asking them. If you can't get Roland to supply you with a chip, then look for forums where people who ...


4

That appears to be a chassis common ground. Update: After re-reading your question, I'm confused by what you mean by "which jacks are shielded?" The circuit diagram says nothing about whether the jacks are shielded or not. It does say that the grounds are connected to chassis ground. Most mixers have a metal body that acts as a shield for the entire device, ...


3

As detailed in the online manual In general these days, the power-off switch on digitally controlled pro audio equipment initiates a controlled shut down procedure instead of just killing the power supply, so you need to worry less about “popping” the system. That being said, you should probably still ensure that all amps & powered speakers are tuned ...


3

This is a capacitive coupling issue. It can be fixed by properly shielding all the electronic parts, i.e. surrounding them with some conductor connected to ground. Hackish though it sounds, the "human ground" is actually quite a common "solution" to this problem: on most electric instruments, the strings are connected to ground, so whenever you actually play ...


2

It depends on the digital mixer. Many digital mixers run on firmware rather than software and such firmware is much simpler than a modern operating system, so sudden loss of power is not a concern due to there not being any critical state data that could get lost. The board will start up clean from a fixed state every boot regardless of what you do. There ...


2

In terms of theory, the bible for electronics (and also the book I'd recommend) is The Art Of Electronics. It's big, covers most of the important aspects for sound engineering and is nicely written. It will address all information you need in terms of physics, all electricity and electronics-specific terminology, and much more. Besides that, I'd second ...


1

The reason for using isolated power is that variations in the voltage provided may impact the processing of effects, particularly when using analog effects. Isolated power prevents the power consumption of one effect from impacting the performance of others. With well designed pedals it is unlikely to matter too much and the impact on decent digital pedals ...


1

44W at 8 Ohm means delivering 2.3A at 18.8V RMS. Now assuming that the 2.3A can also be delivered at lower voltages (note: that isn't self-evident since it means a larger maximum voltage drop across the power transistors), at 6 ohm you have just 33W. The speaker can do 100W. That's fine, right? Once the amplifier starts clipping, a large ratio of the ...


1

Lets start with a picture describing your setup: On the left we start with a Signal Generator, its output measured in V1. From there we input in an EQ, its output measured in V2 From there into the Power amplifier, its output measured in V3 Onwards to the passive X-over, its output measured in V4 Then finally into an Amp-meter (A) to the speaker. (...


1

Open your headphones. Strongly resolder your cables. Add some electric tape around your wire Close back your headphones. here are videos that show you how to open Grado SR-60: video 1 video 2 I guess this must be close to the way to open the SR-80 model.


1

After reading all the solutions submitted, I didn't see the one that worked for me. The copper shielding tape one almost matched mine; however, mine is an even easier fix. When I replaced my saddle I inadvertently scratched the protective foil coating on the piezo itself creating the hum described above. I pulled the piezo out of the slot, cut a thin ...


1

After some time hunting down the same issue I completely fixed the hum by continuing the copper shielding around it right back to the Fishman electronics. I used stick-back copper tape that I'd left over from a Strat shielding job. Wrap all along the black pickup cable and - important - make sure it connects with the copper braid which covers the pickup. ...


1

just fixed hum issue on a prefix plus by removing saddle and pulling pickup out, dusted slot and very slightly sanded saddle thinner, was still humming badly, put back together and half way through putting strings back on the hum stopped.


1

The importance of gain is often overlooked. Many recording interfaces have some sort of clip meter Indicator (often in the mid price a single red light). Manufacturers often recommend setting gain until the light only occasionally lights up to get a desirable input level. However it is not just the highest loudness without clipping of the input signal which ...


1

This is one of the best books published on the basics of Electronics. It is straight and to the point and is written in a way that makes it easy to grasp concepts for beginners. I posted the link below. I used this book to learn the basic concepts of Electronics in just one months time. Best of Luck! Getting Started in Electronics -Krux


1

I'd look into getting an electronics circuit simulator as well. I gather LTSpice is free and people use it: http://www.linear.com/designtools/software/ I studied this in college. There's a lot of physics and math (including complex numbers) to it, but many concepts translate well in audio, plus you get an instant grasp of anything that has a signal flow to ...


1

Back in the dim and distant past when I used to teach electronics I would recommend the following book to my first year students: Electronics Fundamentals: Circuits, Devices & Applications by Thomas L Floyd This covers the theory from the basics although you'll need to practice the practical side in conjunction with the theory. If you have no ...


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