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7

That effect is called Backwards Reverb - the simplest way to do it is to reverse the waveform, then add a normal reverb, then reverse it again. Many DAW's have a backwards reverb plugin which effectively does exactly this, but without you having to do the reversing manually, but I don't think Fruity Loops has this. I did find this tutorial specific to ...


6

To add to the other ideas here, it's often the layered complexity of outdoor reflections that gives them a natural feel. Real spaces, indoor or outdoor, never sound exactly like a reverb preset. I find it fun to design a bunch of options and mix-and-match—my usual strategy is to take 3-4 sends from the dialog/FX tracks and create corresponding aux tracks, ...


6

Usually a convo verb can give decent results, as Dave mentioned. I find that even with that, it all comes down to the predelay and late delay parameters which 'sell it' though primarily, in my opinion. Predalys and late delays, and how they're used, are what give the reverb that character "slap" off the walls (or, the trees) that we recognize in real life. ...


5

Your best bet will be to treat the room you're recording in with absorptive materials to reduce the echo... If you're at home, it can be as simple as hanging a lot of heavy clothes up in front of the walls, especially where you have exposed reflective space on parallel surfaces. The more soft, heavy stuff the better, especially around the spot you're in. ...


4

Have you tried any convolution reverbs? Most of those would have an outdoor sample. I know the stock one in logic has a few. Convolution is really IMO the best approach for recreation of a real space like this. Good luck dude.


4

You should have a good listen to the stage when it's quiet and see if there are any strange echos or booms etc I would guess that bass trapping would help fix your problem, seeing as you say the sound is muddy and unclear. From the little I know about it muddiness tends to come from excessive bass reverb in the room ( often masked by mid/top reverb ) .... ...


4

Refer to attached png Mount PA speakers on outside of hole, on sides as per black rectangles in picture. Place guitar and bass amps/speakers (in red) in rear of hole, also center trap set (drum kit in blue). Do not use floor monitors, instead have every amp mic'ed including PA, and mix with output into "In-Ear" system. Everyone wears an ear piece. UPDATE: ...


3

First off, if you have a hard floor like cement or wood or tile...get an area carpet. Otherwise, you need to use absorber panels. Generally acoustic studio treatment requires 3 devices....bass traps, absorbers, and diffusors (heads up, you won't need all of them). Bass traps, trap bass in the corners of rooms to prevent standing waves (spikes in bass ...


3

Yes, there are ways to try to reduce echo, but they also negatively impact the sound with artifacts. You can use features like gates to try to cut off when someone stops talking directly, but those are probably best applied after recording. There is nothing that you can apply, in software, at the time of recording that you can't apply later. You don't ...


2

I've used the "Outdoorverb" by xoxos on a few projects and have had good results. It's a freeware VST plugin for PC, so unfortunately PT (and MAC) cannot run it. It's a tap delay-type unit which incorporates a pitch variance. It's an interesting little plugin. Recommended if you can run it. http://rekkerd.org/xoxos-releases-outdoorverb/ Good luck with the ...


2

One thing that always helps to get something in a special Place -> Reverb/Impulse Response Reverbs. One thing so -> Don't always think you need a big reverb for wide locations. Sometimes small reverb create a better image of a big wide place, imho. If you want go get your hands dirty -> Go into a wide,rock canyon (or similar, maybe a stadium etc.) and ...


2

This can be done with Audacity's 'Echo' effect. You can set the Time delay to a small number (0.1 for example) and a smallish time decay factor (0.4?) to get the effect of 'being trapped in a large empty room'. But what it sounds like here is that they've kept the original as is and then used an altered copy of the same soundtrack with maybe half of a second ...


2

I'd be far more inclined to try fix it at source first. There are several plugins I've tried that attempt to de-verb, but none anywhere near as successfully as just not recording it in the first place. Simplest trick would be to hang a heavy blanket, duvet or similar on the wall behind you [or hang it over a spare boom stand etc, close up behind you], ...


2

Removing reverb/echo is not a trivial task. Only in recent years has it even been developed to the point where it is usable in the Real World. Most solutions are still quite expensive. "De-verb" is a function that is too complex for something as simple as Audacity. This blog post has some good information that may be helpful: "De-Verb for Free: Removing ...


2

That is called "sidetone". Sidetone is used to confirm to the phone user that their own voice is being picked up. Virtually all telephones use sidetone. A telephone would sound strange or even broken if you didn't hear the sidetone. It sounds like you are trying to make a "speakerphone". Where the microphone can pick up the audio signal from the speaker. ...


2

All hard parallel surfaces are your enemy. Since the space has already been built out you can't (I'm assuming) easily make the walls non-parallel. So you're really left with applying treatments. Some form of sound absorbers would be the most logical first step. Depending on the floor material (and what you can or willing) do with that) you may also need ...


2

See previous discussion here, SPL De-Verb is probably what you're looking for. You can watch a comparison between SPL, iZotope, Zynaptic in this YouTube video.


2

First of all reverb in an empty room is very long , this changes when some stuff gets it. What u'll need is a standing library with books , a cozy soft couch and some shelves here & there with stuff to help scatter the sound. This is give or take what any office already has and helps a lot. But for any type of recording you should spend those 100$ to ...


2

Sound travels at approximately 340m/s. This means that if you make a sound and it reflects off a surface 170 meters away, you will hear the bouncing sound a second later (half a second to get there and half a second back). If the sound was loud enough and there isn't much background noise you should hear repetitions every one second fading away (assuming you ...


1

Uh, clap your hands once. If that doesn't give you an in-the-face clue in the audio waveforms, I don't know what will. Movie takes use clapperboards for a reason.


1

The best solution would be a microphone isolation shield. You can buy one like this, or even make one using plywood, insulation, and a fabric cover. https://www.amazon.ca/Pyle-PSMRS08-Microphone-Isolation-Dampening/dp/B0117E33PG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1459980737&sr=8-2&keywords=microphone+isolation+shield


1

In a pinch I throw a beach blanket over my head, the desk & the mic, to create a mini isolation tent. And I have to move the bird cage into the next room.


1

I'd say you'd be best finding a taiko-like sample. A kick drum with reverb most likely wont get you there. Toms and drums like these usually have a resonant aftertone that kicks dont have. If you wanted to synthesize something similar youd add a second smaller rise in amplitude after the initial hit combined with some kind of filter movement and pitch rise. ...


1

I sounds like it has another layer of big drum, taiko maybe, as you mentioned. This can also be achieved through use of reverb that is sent through and envelope shaper/compressor or eq as you would need to keep only some transients I would also use iZotope's alloy transient shaper - that's one vst that sprung in my mind


1

If the track is stereo (two curves in one track): click on the name of the track and select "Split Stereo Track". If the track is a mono track (one curve), select the track and make a duplicate of the track (Edit menu). Set the L | R track balance to 100% Left for the upper and 100% Right for the lower. Select the first half the upper track and apply a "Fade ...


1

With the excerpt provided, it can be heard that it is not an echo problem but something else: it sounds like the audio is read by buffer and that each buffer is played twice, or maybe each buffer is dedicated to a different channel and they are all played mono. So it is now a matter of removing each second buffer or splitting to stereo, which should not be ...


1

Sounds like you might have experienced a monitoring feedback, either in the signal path because of the routing or in "real world" because you had some speaker playing the recording signal during recording. There are some plugins that attempt to remove reverberation which may also work for you if the first original sound is louder than the delayed one: SPL ...


1

You need to use EQ/Equalization on the dry voice and boost resonant frequency with a narrow notch filter. It might match closer if you then apply a basic reverb afterward, but it will take some trial and error. The important thing about modal frequencies is that practically they are just a higher amplitude of that frequency. If you can identify one or two ...


1

"Noise removal" is a shot in the dark based on statistics. Noise is usually a stochastic, random signal, so it has a non-zero chance of matching the model of speech of the noise removal program. Conversely, speech has a non-zero chance of matching the noise model. Particularly consonants and specifically fricatives are virtually indistinguishable from ...


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