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6

Both as a necessity when using projectors, and as to not risk distracting the actor. Mind you, voice-acting is MUCH harder for actors then regular physically based acting as all there is is a screen and a mic and nothing else. Dimming the room helps them, in my opinion (I too do a lot of voice-acting as well), to forget where they are to some degree and ...


5

After a 3 year hiatus I return with an answer that I hope doesn't get torn to shreds by newer members here: I'm going to start out with a more general answer: NOTHING done as a corrective measure (ADR, 'fixing in post', etc.) is necessary to do on a film set if it is properly planned for and solutions are brought to the table well enough and early enough in ...


2

More often than not, the actor is watching a projected picture, so having a dark room helps with seeing the screen. If you are dubbing in a smaller room, and using a monitor, you can have more ambient light. At our studio we have both systems.


2

I've done a lot of work in animation. As a rough guide I would say that a 12 minute episode (assuming a common delivery of 52x12 min episodes) that you would need 3 days tracklay and 1/2 day to mix. That's also presuming a fairly involved tracklay with little foley and most sounds from libraries. Make sure that you budget time to create all the delivery ...


2

You achieve this by recording the vocals twice and pan each track to each side (L/R). So pretty much the classic double tracking technique, only you do not sum them to mono. The minute differences between the takes are what creates that stereo effect. However if the takes are too far away in timing and pitch it will sound bad. Make sure the performances ...


1

OK so I finally worked this out. Select the audio region to pull-up. F7 for "Direct Offline Processing" Add a "Time Stretch" effect. Select a ratio of 96 (96%). This will shorten the region by 4% Use an algorithm of Elastique-Pro-Time. Apply the effect and Export region at the new length.


1

It is a common practice in video games to have one actor voicing several characters. For film and TV there shouldn't be an issue since actors are ussualy capable of voicing, though over-dubbing is another well used technique in post production.


1

We use 'add lines' to describe anything that was added in post. Walla is used to describe anything in the background. Before we have the script for the 'add' lines we refer to them as TBW's (to be written). That way we know which lines in our ADR list need to be addressed.


1

"Loop Group" is another possibility.


1

Well, there's ADR (additional/automated dialogue replacement) Wildtracks, buzz track. In the states you often hear the term 'walla' to describe crown muttering or bg chatter of any kind. slug usually means a short section of sound often silence


1

While I like 6 days per half hour show (3 for FX, 1 for Dialog edit and 2 for Mix, assuming Dialog is already recorded), the simple truth is there are no established guidelines. The producers will probably have a certain time frame and budget to work with, and basically you'll need to decide whether or not you can do the gig inside those parameters. If you'...


1

I read in the Sound Effects Bible by Ric Viers that working in a darkened room increases your sensitivity to sound. It's quite likely that in a critical listening environment such as an ADR/Dubbing stage that there would be some benefit taking advantage of that phenomenon.


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