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5

Warning: this is perhaps not the answer you are looking for :) You have already got enough gear. What you really need is time, patience, perseverance. Experiment with what you already have, whatever it is that you own, use your imagination and creativity. A typical style of music was not only 'invented' because of the sound or purpose of the gear; it was ...


5

Drum tuning is largely dependent on the style of music being played. A jazz kit will usually be tuned to exact pitches in a scale, such as the snare being tuned to the root, one tom tuned to the fifth, one to the third, one to the root an octave lower, etc. A jazz kit will also usually be tuned such that the top and bottom heads are in tune with each other....


5

These days, what used to be referred to as "the holy grail of the misinformed" is getting closer to actuality. There are now applications designed to do exactly this task - isolate parts of a complete mix & allow you to change their relative levels; including total removal or isolation of sections such as vocals, drums, bass or 'instruments'. ...


4

The only thing that really stands out to me about your setup is the lack of FX. You can safely disregard any effects built in to your mixer. There are a ton of great rack units out there from the '90s that can be found for peanuts on eBay and your local version of Craigslist. Start with Alesis - take a look at the Wedge, QuadraVerb, MidiVerb and Ineko/Akira....


3

Sounds like you'd need to eq away most of the snare, save for the transient, add a little reverb, and compress.


3

Wow, this question illuminates my heart! Pretty inspired of you to ask. The quantization that applies to jazz drumming would most likely not be a standard grid of 8th/16th notes (which is commonly what's thought of when we mention "quantization"), but with a certain amount of swing/shuffle. Or, you know how certain DAWs like Ableton allow quantization in ...


2

Tons of great ideas already, but in the end it all comes down to what you consider a satisfying result - and how many/ what kind of mics you have to work with. It's not just the mics, of course - it's also very much the room. If your room is fairly live without being ringy of resonant at certain frequencies (at the position of your mic/mics), you can use ...


2

I would go for a 2 Microphone setup. Get the best pair of condenser you can achieve. The following technique was used in early rock and roll and really worked for me a couple of times. The idea of this technique is to record the drums in mono with a strong snare and overheads to establish the rhythm. Your kick drum will lack sub frequencies with this ...


2

There are several factors here, and not all may apply to your situation. ReBirth is a really good simulation of 808s, 909s, and 303s, but they are a simulation of ideal versions of them. Your hardware setup is going to invariably differ to some degree. You do state that when you match the settings in ReBirth with your hardware, it sounds "good". This would ...


2

To offer an actual answer to the question instead of a string of comments, I would start with just one or the other mic, get what you like out of it, then add the second. My choice is the D6 at the soundhole of the cajon, because that will give you the fundamental bass "thump" of the thing, as well as a decent amount of the snares, tambourine or other ...


2

Take a look at the Toontrack products. In particular Superior Drummer 2.0 may be of interest:


2

Deezer open-sourced their Spleeter stem separation engine in November 2019: Announcement here and the application is available on Github here. There's also Acon Digital's Acoustica here which since version 7.2 has offered stem separation tools (based on the Spleeter algorithm). Steinberg SpectraLayers from version 7 offers track to stems extraction (vocals ...


1

The tool you are looking for is known as a 'sampler'. I work primarily on Mac, so don't have any particular suggestions in terms of manufacturer for PC applications, but there are definitely a lot out there. Samplers will allow you to edit and trim your samples, and assign them to groups/zones and eventually midi triggers.


1

It depends where you're doing any other processing on the kit. By the time it's rendered (bounced to audio), CPU isn't an issue & the rendering itself is non-realtime, so it doesn't matter. If you're using the kit plugin's own mixer, groups, compressors, EQ etc, then bouncing each individual instrument or mic will affect how the compressors, group ...


1

I had a go with a transient shaper & multi-band compressor, but tbh the track is already finished, mastered, finalised & compressed for market; it doesn't leave you a lot of space to play with. I pushed the transients 18 dB & all I got was... transients. There's too much 'track' to really be able to isolate it.


1

That’s not a snare, it’s a rimshot and/or a woodblock hit.


1

I'd say you'd be best finding a taiko-like sample. A kick drum with reverb most likely wont get you there. Toms and drums like these usually have a resonant aftertone that kicks dont have. If you wanted to synthesize something similar youd add a second smaller rise in amplitude after the initial hit combined with some kind of filter movement and pitch rise. ...


1

I sounds like it has another layer of big drum, taiko maybe, as you mentioned. This can also be achieved through use of reverb that is sent through and envelope shaper/compressor or eq as you would need to keep only some transients I would also use iZotope's alloy transient shaper - that's one vst that sprung in my mind


1

I think you can easily bypass the midi procedure and actually try to fix the dynamics and stuff by using drumagog. This plugin has ,for a snare let's say, 50 samples, of the same snare hit with various ways and as it reads your signal it adapts in the best way it understands. In rock music where there are not a lot of dynamics and things are pretty standard ...


1

You can do this with Logic Pro X or Ableton Live 9. Superior Drummer 2 should be able to plug-in to either one of them. In Logic Pro X, you can place your acoustic drumkit audio recording on an audio track, and go Track ▶ Replace or Double Drum Track. Logic then creates a software instrument drum track with a MIDI representation of your acoustic drum track. ...


1

Compression etc. will definitely be a factor here – a good part of the job of a mastering engineer is to make sure the record will also sound good if played under less than optimal conditions. However, perhaps more important is the simple fact that you perceive the same sound different if you use the speakers as live monitors, especially if you're ...


1

Drum samples default is one shot. This is unlike, say, 8 seconds of a violins sample, which will use a release-bound envelope. There are a few situations where drums aren't one shot: Practical - Some drum samples are long and have long sustain (say a tom sample of 8 seconds). When you program your drums, your notes will be of a certain length and you may ...


1

Jazz recordings were never quantized, but with today's technology you can do much more with quantized music. Quantization started with the invention of MIDI, an electronic music protocol invented in the 80's. Quantization and MIDI have evolved to a point where it's possible to Change audio peaks to midi notes (via setting a waveform peak threshold) ...


1

Easy answer: get SonicCouture's Konkrete 3 and Heavyocity's Damage. Both chock-full of very unusual kits with those types of sounds that aren't just raw samples, but have a lot of thoughtful programming behind them (such as velocity-switching for nuances when you play softer). Actually, Native Instruments Battery 4 has a "Berlin Office" kit with many of ...


1

Do your mics sound good individually? We actually experience phase issues everywhere. This is what gives a space it's sound and what changes the sound of an object or microphone when placed around in a space. However in the OPs case it's quite likely that the two mics are out of phase. As a common example, this occurs each time you mic up a snare drum on ...


1

you can automate white noise with a sidechain plugin fired by the actual hi-hat just to give the position , it's a very very similar sound and widely used. take a channel and put a white noise plugin and leave it open so you hear a static, then put a gate plugin side-chained by the hihat sample. Use very fast settings on the gate. On the hihat channel just ...


1

The crucial thing about cymbals is basically that they have no harmonics, as such – i.e. no series of integer-related resonant frequencies. That's why resonant filters are obviously not such a great idea: they introduce precisely the kind of sonic characteristics that sound un-HiHat-ish. In particular if combined with saturation / distortion, which turns a ...


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